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Full text of "Hardware merchandising (July-December 1902)"

Library 

of the 

University of Toronto 



• B.s« V.iu. 
B«at 

UNOWELl 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada 



OL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 5, 1902 



NO. 27. 




u -Trade- 



\ CUTLERY 



MARK /jp* 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



Queen of the 
Galvanized Iron Trade 




CANADA 

Beloved by all her followers. 

JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 



"That Made the Hit' 

This is a drawing of the Patent Connection 
that made the "SAFFORD" famous the world 
over; that revolutionized radiator building; that 
made it possible to put a radiator together with- 
out bolts, red lead, rods or packing. 

The "SAFFORD" is the only radiator on 
the marcet for hot-water and steam heating. It means satisfaction every 
rime— easy to handle for the contractor. 

1+ you Have not our Catalogue, write to us. 




I 



THE DOMINION RADIATO R CO., Limited 

, "— " TORONTO, CAN. 



Heac 1 Qffice and Works : DUFFERIN ST 



m 



SPORTING 

kMA^M^^A^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVl^M^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVV^ 

GOODS 

VVWVWVVWWWWWWVW AWVW\'VWWW\^WV\ t 



GOLF 

TENNIS 

BASEBALL 

LACROSSE 

FOOTBALL 



u 






ALL KINDS Ol 



FISHING TACKLE 



RIOE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Write for Catalogue and Prices. 



IM 



We Carry in Stock a Full Line of the Following Goods : 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Canada Plates. 
Copper — Bar and Ingot. 

Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 

Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 
Copperine and Babbitt. 
Cotton Waste. 
Crucibles. 
Eave Trough — Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks 

ENQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 

Galvanized, " Gordon Crown." 

Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 
Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 
Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 
Lead Pipe. 

Solder — Half and Half and Standard. 
Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat. 
Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 
Tin— Bar. 

Ingot, " L. & F." and Straits. 
Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 
Zinc — Sheets and Block. 

PLEASE WRiTE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



. 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 



27 Wellington St. West, -^.TORONTO, ONT. 

English House : SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 164 Fenchurch St., LONDON, E.C 







CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEYRE ALL ALIKE 



THAT'S THE BEAUTY OF THE 




No 
Saw Edges 

No Soft Spots 

No Temper Streaks 

No Returned Blades 
to the Dealer 

Will Shave for Years 
Without Requiring Honing 

Sold by all Leading Jobbers, 



Firm of 



BOOKLET 

COMING 

if you'll aBk for 
a copy with 
trade discount. 



A. L. SILBERSTEIN 



MfrF. of 



Cutlery 



453-461 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY. 



GARDEN HOSE 

Seamless Tube 



SEAMLESS TUBE 



LAPPED TUBE 




All brands of our GARDEN HOSE are 

made with our 

Patent Seamless Tube 



WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. IS. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




kee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Flitters. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
' in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver, 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



/ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




No. 112 




WEDGE POINT 

Dealer's Card on Head in Gross Lots. 

No. 110 



NEEDLE POINT. 



WEDGE POINT SPRING PICK. 

No. 113 Dealer's Card on Head in C'dSs Lot*. 





WEDGE POINT SPRING PICK 
Splits Ice like an Axe. 

ANTI=RUST NICKEL-PLATED. 



WALKER'S QUICK AND EASY ICE PICKS. 

ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Er 



Steel Tempered ; will not Bend 
Break or Rust. 



PAINTS 



We manufacture 
these brands : — 
LION," "PEERLESS," "OWL," 
" RAVEN," also Ready-mixed 
House and Floor 
Paints, Roof, Barn, 
Bridge and Brick 
Paints, Coach Colors. 
Varnishes, Japans, 
etc. Our prices will in- 
terest you. Write us, 
The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont. 





Will Hold Up a Shelf ! 

That's what a shelf bracketis for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 
than the .... 
BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light, 
The saving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold 

BSS" Order direct or through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 

Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 

AND 

. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 



P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 

STOVE BRICK 

FIRECLAY AND ASBESTOS 
FURNACE CEMET 

all kinds of File Clay Products made to order from 
patterns. Write us for varieties and prices. 

JONES BROS., Bracondale. P.O.. Ont 

(near Toronto.) 



Lace Leather 

Send direct to us for the celebrated 
" NIAGARA " Brand Lace Leather, best 
produced in this country. Yellow and 
White in Sides or Cut Strings. Prices and 
Samples on application. 

WOOD BROS. 

Tanners of High-Class Leathers, 
3T. CATHARINES, ONT. 




JITobles 8g\ MEoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON. ENC. 

Manufacturers ot 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the -works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



BISHOP & CO. 



Established 
1850. 



27 and 38 Little Trinity Lane, 



LONDON, ENG. 



54 Scotland St., SHEFFIELD 

Table Cutlery, all qualities. 



23 Vittoria St., BIRMINGHAM 

Wrought Steel Pots, round or oval. 



Samples on view at the following Agencies : — 

Alex. Thurber, 446 St. Paul St.. 

E. Fielding, 34 Yonge St., 

E. L. Denoncourt, 74 St. Joseph St., 



Tinned inside or enamelled. 

MONTREAL. 

TORONTO. 

QUEBEC. 



WIRE ROPE 



Wire Rope. 



OF. 




All Kinds and Sizes 



AND FOR 

All Purposes. 

PRICES RIGHT. PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 

The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 

The Zanzibar Paint Co., Limited 

TORONTO. Sole Manfrs. 

Zanzibar House Paints. 

Strong Colors, Durable Gloss, Uniform and Smooth. 

Zanzibar Floor Paints. 

Easily Spread, Elastic and Durable— Dry Quickly and Hard. 

Zanzibar Roof and Barn Rainfts. 

Low Priced, Smooth Hody, Weather-Proof. 
Zanzibar Shing-le Stains contain no anilines, bul best pigments- Permanent Colors, Strong Presdrvative 
NOTE :— We're a strictly Canadian house, buying all we can in Canada, quality being equal jaid we 
will appreciate you- patronage or an opportunity to tell you more about ourselves and our goods. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Up-to-Date Mechanics we 

Up-to-Date Tools. 

We are always on the alert for the latest productions of the 
inventive genius in mechanics' tools. We study the 
mcchanic'. JW t %4 lflfl2 - 

RET 






SYRACUSE BRACE DRILL SETS. 

-'s. 5/3 2 . 3/i6. 7/32, %, S/16, and H inch. 
No. 23 for woody*. No. 24 for metal. 



SAVAGE Magazine Tack Hammer ; pull 
the trigger and drive the tack, that's all. 
Only one hand required. 



w . 



Combiuation Pliers— 6, 6K and 10-in. Wire 
cutter, gas pliers, wrench and screw driver 
combined. ^Pgtent adjustment Tor different 
size pipes,RETyg|yj£0 




U 180*1 



ELGIN MONKEY WRENCH 
PIPE JAWS, fits any monkey 
wrench, takes pipe 'A to 3 inches. 




«0j> 



Carpenters' Aprons. 
Blacksmiths' Aprons. 




UNIVERSAL SPOKE SHAVE. 

Either handle can be screwed 
into top of stock (as shown). 
Especially desirable for work- 
ing in comers or cramped 
places. 











P. S. & W. Leather Capped Socket Firmer Chisels. Singly or in sets of 9 or 12 chisels. 
Highest quality gun metal finish, in plain or bevel back. Nothing finer made. 

LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



TORONTO, 

87 YORK ST. 



MONTREAL. 



OTTAWA, 

54 QUEEN ST. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the Celebrated 




"UNION 'JACK" 
CUTLERY. 

Canadian Office : 
6 ST. SACRAMENT ST, MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF ' ■ 

TINWARE AND TIN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
Jacketed Oil Cans, 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Pails, Etc. 

JAS. A. McGOLPIN 

156=162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



THE ALABASTINE CO, Limited, PARIS, ONT. 

Are still doing business at the old stand, manufacturing and selling Land and Calcined 
Plaster: Paristone — the best Cement Wall Plaster; Church's Bug Finish that kills 
Potato Bugs with one application ; and best of all 

ALABASTINE 

so well and favorably known "The World Over." The Wall Coating that has 
proof of origin, and sells on its own merits. No substitute or imitation about 
ALABASTINE ; it is the original product, made adapted for use in Cold Water 
by the inventor, Mr. M. B. Church, the first and only person whoever developed 
a practical Cold Water compound with Calcined Gypsum as a base. 

ALABASTINE is patented in Canada and other Countries. Our patents, 
like our goods, are genuine, and practical for making a wall coating in the 
manner prescribed. Facts are indeed stubborn things. 



-The Trade Supplied by- 



Sanderson Pearcy & Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Wood, Vatlance & Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London, Ont. 
Vancouver Hardware Co., Vancouver, B.C. 



William Hill, Montreal, P Q. 
W. H. Thorne & Co., St. John, N.B. 
Q. F. Stephens & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Miller, Morse & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited. 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan - American Exposition, 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

SWu ROPE, SfjgftKBfi: BINDER TWINE 

Transmission Rope a Specialty. 





DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 



it 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improv- 
ed for season of 1902. Steel or Wood Frame 
as desired. 



Steel Frame Churn 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

Maxwell Favorite Churn " Lawn Mowers. se * a *£ o y b £& 

widths. Cold Rolled 
Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 

articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 

THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches. 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different Sizes. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



llJXrER DECORATIVE GLASS j<,. 




224, Jl. 50 
235, 2.75 
238a, 2.00 



247, $1.10 322, $3.50 

313, 1.50 323. 3.50 

317, 1.50 " . 324, 1.2. r 



in Bright Antique or Blaok Finish. Leaded work of all kinds, 

iporters of Etruscan, Muffled, Craokled and Cathedral Glass. 



WRITE FOR PRIC 



LUXFER PRISM CO., Limited, ?8-ioo King street West, TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






IY, »i:uni,« 
^ >viii T1 j 




Cold Water Paint. 



INDELIBLO is the greatest seller in the cold water 
paint line that has come along so far. Take white for 
instance, we sell it at 5c. per lb., and one lb. will cover 
from 20 to 75 square feet, according to surface. It's a 
beautiful white to light up dark corners and shafts in 
factories, breweries, elevators, etc. We have it in all 
colors, too. 

Agents: 



A. RAMSAY & SON, 
J. II. ASEIDOWN, 

Mclennan, mcfeely £> co., 



MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 

VANCOUVER 



mra$rasraratraiM&m 









BINDER TWINE i 



i Blue Ribbon, Redcap, 
m Tiger, Golden Crown. 

1 The Old Reliable Farmers' Favorites 



For Prices Apply, 



Consumers Cordage Co. i 

LIMITED, 2JJ 

MONTREAL, QUE. i 



:OR: 



W. B. STEWART, | 

27 Front Street West, - TORONTO, ONT. »K 

^^sisssmsisiiiiSHsiisisiisiiiiisiiHiisissi nisi 




^ Australasian «* 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 



post free to any part of the world. 

PUBLISHING OFFICES : 

Melbourne 

Sydney, 
AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, . Park Row Building. 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, - AS Cannon St., E.C 

Specimen Copies on application. 



™ / 3? 



iRfiy 



^^ L/M/rEO. 



WE LEAD 

IN THE HANUFACTURE OF : 

Cold Pressed Nuts, 
Square and Hexagon, 
Finished and Semi-Finished, 
Cap Screws, 
Set Screws, * 

Thumb Screws, Bolts, 
Special Milled Work, etc. 

Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 

14-16 King St. East, TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



It Pays the Dealer 




Will freeze cream in 4 minutes. 



TO HANDLE THE 

White 

Mountain 

Freezer 



BECAUSE 

It is the best acting, best looking, strongest, most durable and 

best selling freezer manufactured. 
There is not a weak point about it or a waste part to it. 
It embraces all the good features to be found in all other 

freezers, and many more besides that are peculiar to itself. 

Sole Agents For Canada : 

THE McCLARY MANUFACTURING CO., 

London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John, N.B, 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shlngleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cable* 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

■ ■ Limited 

WasUra OntarU Raprasentatlva- 

wu. b. stewart. MONTREAL, QUE. 

TelM. 17 Front St. Waat, TORONTO, 



ESTABLISHED 1750 




(«") L L I T M SCOTLAND , 

i 1 1 ] V '. '■ '■ j" 

I Malm. Latl^^^^HBl EVERY rl nW I 

Cordagem* Canvas 







"Vivify i /,////'* 



1 

STEAMER 
CLOTH 



lf# AND % 

I ffir sail cumiiQ 

WCOMPANYjjl 

V lEITH^J 

/T50 



MANILA ROPE 

SISAL ROPE 

NEW ZEALAND ROPE 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHINC LINES 

NETTINC TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS&PACKINCS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS 



1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAULINCS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPINC TWINES 



BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



I: 1 

eoinburch 
Waterproof 



^T AND 4> 

WSAIL CLOTH %> 

iJCOMPANYi? 

^•LEITH^ 
1150 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE AND STORES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Consumer Looks 
To The Dealer 





to furnish him or her with the very best articie that can be purchased for the money they expend. 
If the dealer fails in this a good customer may be sacrificed. ' Every dealer should know that in 

Boeckh's Brooms and Kitchenware, 
Bryan's High-Class Brushes, 
Cane's Unrivalled Woodenware 

they not only furnish to their customers the very best goods that can be made in their respective lines, 
but they afford at the same time the largest margin of profit. Satisfaction to dealer and consumer 
guaranteed. 

If our representative does not visit your town, write us, and we will, if possible, arrange for him to 
call upon you, or we will send you quotations and full particulars of these goods by mail. 



UNITED FACTORIES, 



OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 



Limited, 

Head Office : Toronto. 



We have opened a new London ware- 
house so that we can ship all goods 
for Western Ontario direct from that 
branch. 

65 Dundas Street, London. 



^ Seasonable Goods 






$&* 



^ 




Novelty Refrigerators and Water 
Coolers Combined . . ,4^ 



An article of utility. 

Preserves meats and other articles of 
food as well as any refrigerator made. 

Consumes but a small quantity of ice. 

Has Nickel-Plated Faucet attached to Ice 
Chest, and will supply ice water if 
required without using an extra quan- 
tity of ice. 

Substantially made of galvanized iron, 
and finished in oak. 

Low in prioe and inexpensive in opera- 
tion. Within the reach of everybody. 

Ice Cream Freezers 



"LIGHTNING" and 
Equal to the Best. 




'BLIZZARD" 

None Better. 
A FULL LINE CARRIED IN STOCK. 



\A/e \A/ill be 



leased -to Quote You. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., T OK ™™ ADA . 




VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 5, 1902. 



NO. 27. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

Thc MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES. 

Montreal - 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

Toronto - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

London, Eng. - - 100 Fleet Street, E.C. 

W. H, Miln. 
Manchester, Eng. - - 18 St. Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 
Winnipeg - - - Western Canada Block. 

J. J. Roberts. 
Vancouver, B.C. - - - Flack Block. 

J. A. Macdonald. 
St. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
New York - Room 443 New York Life Bldg. 
Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address 1 Ads c ri P l . London. 
Cable Address | Adscript| Canada . 



•WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



BOARDS OF TRADE AND LABOR 
TROUBLES. 

THE successful manner in which the 
representatives of the Toronto Board 
of Trade carried on the negotia- 
tions which brought about a settlement 
of the street railway strike in Toronto, 
Ins; emphasized the importance of the 
Toronto Board of Trade as a medium of 
conciliation in labor disputes. 

The Toronto Board of Trade, as all other 
boards of trade, is essentially a represen- 
tative business body, and no one knows 
better than its members the evil effects of 
strikes, for no one certainly suffers more, 
next to the families of the strikers, than the 



business interests of a community in which 
there is an open rupture between capital 
and labor. 

Some years ago the Toronto Board of 
Trade obtained certain powers to enable it 
to act as a board of conciliation in regard 
to disputes of various kinds, but hitherto 
its work in this direction has been of little 
importance, and certainly has never at- 
tracted as much attention as its recent suc- 
cessful efforts in regard to the street rail- 
way strike in Toronto. 

The London Chamber of Commerce has 
for some years done a great deal of good 
work in the way of conciliation, and there 
is no reason why such important boards of 
trade as those of Toronto and Montreal 
should not be as useful. 

No one is certainly more competent than 
business men to adjudicate upon such 
questions as are embraced in disputes be- 
tween capital and labor. They do not look 
at the questions in dispute from a technical 
standpoint, nor are they influenced by fine 
points of law. They look at it from a bus- 
iness and common-sense standpoint and act 
accordingly. 

It is to be hoped that the experience of 
the Toronto Board of Trade will inspire 
other boards of trade throughout the 
country to emulate its example in the mat- 
ter of local disputes between capital and 
labor. 

IT IS A TAX ON PEDDLERS. 

It has been said in some of the news- 
papers that the city of Quebec proposed to 
placeatax on commercial travellers. It turns 
out, however, according to an explanation 
which has been furnished by the authorities 
of that city, that the tax is not aimed against 



the regular commercial traveller, but is to 
apply to what are commonly called peddlers. 
Peddlers, as we all know, contribute very 
little towards the support of the municipality, 
while they frequently do a great deal to 
disturb trade and the profits of the legitimate 
merchant. While the Quebec tax of $300 
may be excessive, it is obvious to everyone 
in business that the ordinary peddler should 
be made to pay at least a fair tax. 



THE RIGHT VOCATION. 

NEXT to the possession of enterprise 
and energy that will not be balked 
by obstacles, there is nothing more 
necessary to success in life than the choice 
of vocation. 

Unless there is adaptibility there can 
scarcely be success. It is better to be a 
first-class bootblack than a poor lawyer. 
One of the evidences of this is to be seen in 
the experience of a certain New York boot- 
black. 

Eighteen years ago he began business in 
that city. His outfit consisted of the usual 
bootblacking kit slung across his shoulder. 
He was industrious as well as ambitious, 
and he finally secured a stand in the Pro- 
duce Exchange building, and became known 
as" Tony, the Bootblack." Eventually he 
had stands in other buildings throughout the 
city besides, and it came out in court the 
other day that he was now worth $1,000,000. 

It should be stated that all this million 
dollars was not made by blacking boots, 
but he saved a large sum of money from his 
work, and with the money thus saved he 
did some speculating, and with successful 
results. 

Possibly, if Tony had gone into any other 
vocation than blackening boots he would 
have been a failure rather than a success. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PIG IRON SITUATION IN CANADA. 



PIG IRON in Canada is still in a pretty 
strong position. The condition of 
stocks throughout the country neces- 
sitates steady buying. Representatives of 
the furnaces report that they are taking a 
large number of orders for delivery for the 
first half of next year, and, from what we 
can gather, a larger quantity of pig iron has 
been already sold for 1903 than there was 
up to February last for 1902. 

A new feature in the pig iron situation in 
Canada is the demand which has arisen for 
iron on steel rail making account. The 
Clergue works, at Sault Ste. Marie, since 
they began operations, have turned out steel 
rails at the rate of 500 tons per day. Before 
the rail mills were started, the company 
bought from one blast furnace alone 30,000 
tons of pig iron, and it has since repeated 
the order. 

It is the general opinion among authorities 
that the consumption of pig iron in Canada 
to day, since the starting.up of the Clergue 
steel-rail mills a couple of months ago, is in 
excess of the quantity that is being turned 
out by the home furnaces. This, however, 
is only a temporary matter, as, when all the 
furnaces are in blast, the quantity will, of 
course, be more than sufficient to supply the 
home market. 

Since beginning operations the Sydney 
furnaces have, as our readers are aware, 
exported over 50,000 tons to Great Britain 
alone. The official returns show that from 
the whole of Canada during the first ten 
months of the present fiscal year, ending 
April last, the total quantity exported to 
all countries was 92,571 tons, valued at 
$902,492. Of this quantity 87,000 tons 
went to Great Britain alone. For the whole 
twelve months of the fiscal year 1901 the 
total quantity of pig iron exported from 
Canada only amounted to 5,623 tons, of 
which but 1,603 tons went to Great Britain. 
It will thus be seen at a glance how enor- 
mous is the increase this year over its 
predecessor. 

That the steel works at Sault Ste. Marie 
will be a large consumer of pig iron for 
some time to come is evident from the fact 
that it already has on its books orders 
for about 100,000 tonsof steel rails. 



In the United States the pig iron situation 
has not materially changed. Business at 
the moment is not as active as it was, which 
is, of course, to be expected at this time of 
the year. Another two months, however, 
is likely to see a revival of the demand. 
Quite a few orders, however, are being 
taken for next year's delivery, and prices 
in some instances are even higher than 
they were a week or two ago. It is sig- 
nificant that some of the Southern furnaces 
are doing business on a basis of $19 at the 
furnaces for No. 2 foundry, which is $2.50 
per ton above the figures at which contracts 
were made only a month ago. The Phila- 
delphia correspondent of The New York 
Metal Exchange says that the scarcity of 
pig iron is greater than ever, and that there 
are no prospects of easier condition in the 
near future, although the midsummer holi- 
days may cause a slight gain in the supply. 



$200,000 to $50,000 per annum. In these 
sums it should be remembered no account 
is taken of the large income which some of 
these gentlemen receive in their capacity as 
officers of the steel corporation. 



THE STEEL TRUST'S BIG PROFITS 

ATTENTION has again been drawn 
to what is commonly called The 
United States Steel Trust, on 
account of the enormous profits which it 
has been making during the last three 
months. These profits amount to over 
$37.Soo,ooo and break all former records 
since the United States Steel Corporation 
was organized. 

It will be remembered that when the Trust 
was formed a good many were skeptical as 
to its permanency on account of its heavy 
capitalization. The conditions ever since 
the corporation was organized have been in 
its favor, and while the test of hard times 
is yet to come, it is evident from the results 
of the past that confidence in the perman- 
ency of the corporation is stronger than it 
ever was. 

A statement has recently been published 
showing the large profits which some of the 
individual members of the Trust have 
made. Mr. Henry Phipps has an annual 
income from the shares he holds of $1,1 49, - 
000; Mr. H. C. Frick follows with $900,000; 
then comes Mr. Henry W. Oliver, $490,000; 
Charles M. Schwab, $370,000, and Alex. 
R. Peacock, $249,373. Besides these, a 
number of the stockholders receive as their 
share of the profits sums ranging from 



THE TOURIST ASSOCIATION 
MOVEMENT. 



■■ 



CANADIANS feel a national pride in 
their country, a pride increasing 
with wider information and a more 
thorough knowledge of its boundless 
resources. The strenuous activity of its 
industrial enterprises throbs with a quick- 
ened pulsation under the vitalizing influence 
of a limitless supply. Broad harvest fields, 
ever extending their boundaries, flout at 
famine or at want. But even we Canadians 
are just awakening to the capabilities of the 
land we own. 

In no country can the realization of the 
adage • ' All work and no play makes Jack 
a dull boy" be better attained. Canada 
can supply the means for rest, for recreation, 
as well as for work. Nature laughs in the 
ripples of sparkling rivers, and frowns with 
the grandeur of towering mountains, and 
teems with the life of fine old forests. 
Island homes give a charm and a repose to 
refreshing holidays. 

When these advantages are seized by us, 
it means a vitalized energy and a freshened 
zeal which represents great capital when wa 
resume work. When these advantages are 
seized by strangers, it means expenditure 
for our good, the development of great 
pleasure places, and profit for the country. 

The only way to attract others is to ex- 
tend our reputation, to let people know 
about us, to acquaint them with the fact 
that Canada is, par excellence, the place for 
tourists. Tourists' associations effect the 
required advertising better than all other 
means. In previous numbers the com- 
mendable zeal of associations already formed 
has been noted. 

Victoria has taken the lead on the Cana- 
dian Pacific Coast, but others have been 
formed at Nelson and New Denver, and 
Vancouver is agitating for one. 

The formation of tourist associations 
diverts from other quarters to our own dis- 
tricts much of the summer expenditure of 
wealthy outsiders. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN OUR OWN. 






PARIS GREEN EASIER IN THE UNITED STATES 

DURING the past week there has been 
a noticeable falling off in the de- 
mand for paris green, resulting in a 
'.vsaker market. The stocks in manufac- 
turers' hands are not large, and some 
makers are only accepting orders from their 
regular customers. The season continues 
cool in the eastern section of the country 
and vegetation consequently backward. 
With the event of continued hot weather 
the bugs may become more troublesome 
and an urgent demand may be experienced. 
— Iron Age, June 26. 

CUT AND WIRE NAILS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

The scarcity in cut nails continues in a 
modified degree and less trouble is experi- 
enced in getting prompt shipments than for 
some time. Iron cut nails are still difficult 
to obtain . 

Stocks of wire nails are beginning to 
accumulate at the mills, owing to the de- 
crease in demand. Many mills will take 
advantage of this condition to close in July 
for the annual repair and clean up, which is 
required after a year of continuous opera- 
tion. — Iron Age, June 25. 

LINSEED OIL IN CHICAGO. 

The market continues firm at 6;c. for car- 
load lots raw. Crushers do not claim to be 
selling any great amount of oil at that figure, 
but they all say that prices are not shaded 
to make sales. The situation seems to be 
strong enough to justify the quotation and 
a firm market. In common with the general 
demand for paints the demand for oil also 
holds good and sales are reported larger 
than last year at this time. Consumers 
have been holding off for lower prices and 
may have to come into the market in July 
and August at higher figures. Sales of oil 
for fall delivery are not reported. Neither 
crushers nor buyers are in the mood for 
these transactions. Present demands are 
sufficient to keep the market fairly active. 
We quote 64c. on carload lots raw. — Paint, 
Oil and Drug Review, June 25. 

THE PIG TIN SITUATION. 

ft 
The downward movement in pig tin 

received fresh impetus to-day on the publica- 
tion of the monthly statistics, which, as 
expected, were unfavorable for bull interests. 
As indicated by previous advices, shipments 
from the Straits during June were heavy, 
amounting to 4.970 tons, compared with 
4,330 tons for the corresponding period last 
year. While the deliveries for the month 
were liberal, the arrivals were on an equally 



large scale, the former amounting to 3 300 
tons and the latter to 3.744 tons. The spot 
stock in store and landing on June 30 was 
3,036 tons, while the stock afloat at that 
date amounted to 3.388 tons. For the first 
time this year the total visible supply 
showed a large increase, the figures being 
1 5, 897 tons, against 14, 766 tons at the same 
time in 1901. The tone of the market to- 
day was weak, very little interest being 
shown by buyers and no business of conse- 
quence being accomplished. Spot further 
declined 25 points, being offered at 27.75c, 
with 27.25c. bid. For July 27.32^. was 
asked and 27.15c. bid, while on August the 
bid and asked prices were 26.75 t0 27.25c, 
on September 26.50 to 27c, and on October 
26.25 t0 26.75c. In London the market 
was quiet and easy, closing at a further 
decline of £1 on spot and of 2s. 6d. on 
futures. The Singapore quotation declined 
5s. to .£121 5s. — New York Journal of 
Commerce, July 2. 

SITUATION IN COPPER. 

There was no business of consequence in 
this metal to day and the market was easy, 
prices showing a further slight decline. For 
delivery spot to October Lake was offered 
12.25c with u.87#c. bid ; electrolytic was 
quoted at 12c asked and'i 1.85c bid, cast- 
ing at 11.75 ar> d 12c, and standard at 
u.37j£ and 11.75c Exports for June, 
according to figures compiled for the Metal 
Exchange, show a very considerable de- 
crease compared with those of preceding 
months this year, being but 12,560 tons, 
against 15,493 tons in May, 16,400 tons in 
April, 20,015 tons in March, 14,001 tons 
in February and 15.474 tons in January. 
The total shipments for the six months were 
93 943 tons, compared with 49.325 tons for 
the corresponding time in 1901 and 85,322 
tons in 1900. The London market today 
showed little change. There was an earlier 
decline of is. 3d. in spot, which was 
recovered after noon, while futures advanced 
2s. 6d. for the day, increasing the premium 
to 7s. 6d. — N.Y. Journal of Commerce, 
July 2. 



LEAD AND SPELTER IN NEW YORK. 

Pig Lead — A steady feeling characterized 
the market, though there was not much 
business. Prices are still based on 4. I2^c 
in lots of 50 tons or more. St. Louis was 
firm, with 3.97 J^c bid. Late yesterday 
200 tons chemical hard sold at that figure. 
The London market was unchanged. 

Spelter— The market remains very firm, 
but in the absence of important supplies the 
quotation of 5c. is somewhat nominal. St. 



Louis was stronger. After sales of 50 tons 
at 4.85c that market advanced to 5c In 
London there was no change. — New York 
Journal of Commerce, July 2. 

IRON AND STEEL IN THE STATES. 

Pig Iron — Sales of pig iron have been 
mainly of foundry for next year's delivery, 
and for deliveries beginning late this year 
and running into next year. On business 
where there are any deliveries called for 
this year, furnacemen claim to have gotten 
$22 to $22.50 for No. 2, while for small lots 
for early shipment $23 could probably be 
secured, In bessemer there have been 
only a few thousand tons sold. The price 
is very firm at 521, valley, for fourth 
quarter, and for earlier delivery a variety 
of prices has been made on small lots. 
Gray forge has become quite strong and 
there has been some selling for the late 
months of the year at (20.50 on up to 
521.25 for quick delivery. Southern forge 
is lower than northern, and is selling at 
$20.25 to 520.75, according to delivery. 
There is a pronounced scarcity in pig iron, 
accentuated by the continued curtailment of 
production in southern Ohio and eastern 
Pennsylvania respectively, due to the anth- 
racite strike and the West Virginia strikes 
respectively. 

Steel — Domestic steel continues on a 
lower level than formerly, and, while there 
is a fair inquiry, it does not lead to much 
business, as prices are higher than finishing 
mills can take chances on. Nearly all sales 
are of small lots for early shipment, and as 
high as 534 at mill is occasionally being paid 
for Bessemer billets. For extended delivery, 
mills do not seem to be ready to pay over 
$32 or 533. Sheet bars are relatively lower 
than billets, and the market is about $33, 
'but even at this figure sheet mills are not 
very ready to take hold. Wire rods remain 
firm at $36.50 to $37. — The American 
Metal Market, July 1. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. C. M. Irvine, hardware merchant, 
of Arthur, Ont., was in Toronto this week 
on a business trip and called on Hardware 
and Metal. Mr. Irvine also has a store 
at Grand Valley. 



TRADE CHAT. 

The Halifax agency of The E. B. Eddy 
Co., Limited, has been elevated to the 
dignity of a branch. John Peters, who 
has for a number of years looked after the 
interests of this firm in that city with marked 
success is retiring owing to poor health. 
J. T. Sheriff, who has been connected with 
The Eddy Co. for some years, has been 
placed in charge of the branch there as 
manager. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



^uwttwyvwftwwwwftwyvwftwwwwwyww^ 



HOW A BUSY YOUNG MILLIONAIRE 
EMPLOYS HIS TIME. 



^(WWWWWWWW^^ 



JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER., JR.. son 
of the richest man in the world, has a 
remarkable mission — a task which 
he is making the supreme purpose of his 
life, according to a New York paper. 

It is, as all philosophers will agree, no 
trivial thing that this young Croesus has 
undertaken. Even the Scriptures (see Luke 
xviii., 25) have intimated, through the para- 
ble of the rich man, the camel and the 
needle's eye, that it is next to impossible. 
But Mr. John D. Rockefeller, jr., perse- 
veres in his noble mission, which is, in 
plain words, to square business with 
Christianity, to Christianize commerce, and, 
strange as it may seem to the layman, is 
absolutely encouraged by the results which 
he has obtained. 

In a speech which he delivered a short 
time ago before the Y. M. C. A. of Brown 
University on the topic, "Business as a 
Life Work," John D. Rockefeller, jr., made 
plain his mission as he understands it. 

*• Many men of to-day," said he, "think 
that business and Christianity are diametri- 
cally opposed to each other. We have 
come here for the purpose of expressing 
the belief that they may go hand in hand, 
and that the most successful business men 
can be, should be and are the most suc- 
cessful Christian men. 

" There are three chief requisites for a 
successful business man. The first is hon- 
esty — absolute honesty ; the second is in- 
dustry and the third is perseverance. 

* ■ We must not be quitters. A fourth 
point to be considered is justice." 

Here John D. Rockefeller, jr., interjected 
a plausible if not profound defence of trusts, 
in which, it being one of his few " flowery " 
speeches, he compared them to American 
Beauty roses. 

" Large concerns," said he, " often shut 
out smaller men who cannot compete. 
Oftentimes we cannot reconcile this fact. 
It seems to us contrary to the Golden Rule. 

" Let us go back and examine the true 
causes. The big businesses increase be- 
cause they can by advanced methods and 
appliances place their goods on the market 
cheaper than can the smaller concerns. 

" Modern methods should be employed 
even at the expense of the few. 

' ' The American Beauty rose can be pro- 
duced in the splendor and fragrance which 



brings cheer to its beholder only by sacri- 
ficing the early buds which grow up around 
it. This is not an evil tendency in busi- 
ness. It is merely the working out of a law 
of nature and a law of God." 

Among young John D. Rockefeller's 
aphorisms are several that sum up his brief 
philosophy : 

" The chief thing in life is to do some- 
thing — to work." 

" I know what it is to cut wood and to 
crush stone roads at 15c. an hour." 

" It is by doing the work that is at hand 
that we become useful and successful." 

" Success comes by doing the common, 
everyday things of life uncommonly well." 

•vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv»/vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv 

SOME OF HIS MAXIMS. 

The most successful business men can be, 
should be and are the most successful 
Christian men. 

There are three chief requisites for a suc- 
cessful business man. The first is hon- 
esty — absolute honesty ; the second is 
industry and the third is perseverance. 

Modern methods should be employed even 
at the expense of the few. 

The chief thing in life is to do something — 
to work. 

The growth of a big business is merely a 
survival of the fittest. 

Do the little every-day duties of life without 
a murmur. Do them well. That is suc- 
cess. 

Thirty cents is all I ever spend for luncheon. 
It's enough for any man on a salary. 

Success comes by doing the common, every- 
day things of life uncommonly well. 

vwwwvwwvvvvwwwwwwvvwwwv 

" Do the little everyday duties of life 
without a murmur. Do them well. That 
is success." 

"A war may cost many lives, but it is 
for the good of the country at large. The 
growth of a big business is merely a sur- 
vival of the fittest." 

John D. Rockefeller, jr., began to work 
and to earn money when he was six years 
old. 

His first hard day's work netted him 
13c. His father offered him a fee of ic. 
for every fence post in need of repair that 
the boy could find on the big country place 
near Cleveland, O. 

Young Rockefeller tramped miles, and 
in 12 hours hustling he earned the 13c. 

Another time he lived up to his work 
maxim by working out his father's road 
tax and collecting the wages from Rocke- 
feller, sr. 



It is doubtful if he ever really wasted a 
penny. 

"Thirty cents is all I ever spend for 
luncheon," he remarked one day. " It's 
enough for any man on a salary. Sweet- 
meats ruin the digestion, anyhow," 

He never touches wine. He never 
smokes. Wine, at his request, was left off 
the menu at his wedding breakfast, when 
he married Miss Abby Aldrich last fall. 

He gave his first society entertainment in 
a dinner- dance at the Waldorf-Astoria 
recently. There was no wine on the supper 
cards. 

When he was a student at Brown Uni- 
versity he was talking one day with a 
fellow- student who worked his way through 
college. 

"A man who works and is exposed to 
all kinds of weather has to be mighty care- 
ful about taking cold," said the first student. 
' ' I always wear three weights of underwear 
in winter." 

" Three weights of underwear ! Great 
Scott ! I can't afford to wear more than 
two myself! It's reckless extravagance," 
said John D. Rockefeller, jr. 

Work, the necessity of religion and the 
righteousness of making money and getting 
on in the world are the three pegs upon 
which Rockefeller, jr., invariably hangs his 
speeches. 

He talks without gestures and usually 
without raising his eyes from the desk or 
from the notes that he has in hand. 

Of medium height, rather thick set, pale, 
weak-eyed, spectacled and serious, dressed 
faultlessly in black, with a shiny black tile, 
the richest young man in the world looks 
nothing so much as a promising divinity 
student. 

He once made a speech to the students 

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13 



of Tuskegee Institute, Booker Washington's 
school. 

A sea of black faces looked up curiously 
at the pale, mild-mannered young fellow 
who looked down at them over a big white 
puff tie. 

"My friends," he said, "do not be 
ashamed to do any kind of work that falls 
"%nto your hands. When I went into my 
father's office I was willing to do any sort 
of work they wanted me to do, even if it 
were putting on my # father's shoes. I did 
not care how humble it was. I wanted to 
begin at the bottom and learn. Do not be 
afraid to make a lowly beginning. 

"I once assisted a young man to get a 
position. He remained in it two days, and 
when I asked him why he had left he said : 
' They put me to sweeping the floor and I 
quit. I am too old to be sweeping the 
floor.' 

" I am delighted with your school. I am 
going to prove that by coming back in nine 
months. I have a reason for returning. 
As I was visiting the night class I came 
across a young man who was exercising for 
his class on the blackboard. He had 
written : ' Nine months after date I promise 
to pay to John D. Rockefeller, jr., $650, 
with interest from date, for value received.' 

" I asked the teacher to have him sign 
it, and he did. I am coming back in nine 
months to see that young man." 

If John D. Rockefeller, jr., had gone 
more into details as to his own business 
career he might have brought out these 
facts : 

About four years ago he began as a clerk 
on small wages in his father's New York 
office. He learned the routine of the busi- 
ness, and he is to-day his father's private 
secretary. He rise at 6.20 a.m. and rides 
or drives, or, if he is stopping at the Tarry- 
town place he chops wood until 7 o'clock. 

After breakfast he starts down town and 
reaches his office at 9. 30. He works till 
3.30 p.m., when he knocks off and goes 
over to a Broad street restaurant, where he 
gets his 30c. lunch. 

From that time until dinner at 6 he 
amuses himself, usually in works for the 
Fifth Avenue Baptist Church or Sunday- 
school, or in reading, violin playing or 
walking through the park. His dinner 
consists of soup, meat and one simple 
dessert, with never any wine. He is not a 
member of any club, and spends his even- 
ings at home with his wife, his father and 
his mother. 

In his few independent business ventures 
John D. Rockefeller, jr., has always acted 
upon the theory of the survival of the fittest. 

He made his first million in a speculation 
in leather, in which a good many men went 
to the wall. He engineered a copper and 



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transportation deal which largely advanced 
freight rates and gave the Rockefellers con- 
trol of the shipping industry of the Great 
Lakes. 

It is in addresses to his Bible class in the 
Sunday-school of the Fifth Avenue Baptist 
Church that young Rockefeller has trained 
himself as a lay preacher. 

"I am more than a Baptist," he re- 
marked one Sunday ; " I am a Christian." 

In a talk one day on the Belshazzar feast, 
the most famous orgy in Bible history, and 
the handwriting, " Mene. mene. Tekel 
upharsin," traced upon the wall, the mil- 
lionaire lay preacher said : 

' ' The reading of this Belshazzar lesson 
has always inspired me with solemn 
thoughts. I have often asked myself 
whether I would be found wanting in the 
balance when the time came to weigh me. 

"I trust that when we stand before the 
great white throne we shall not be told that 
we have been weighed in that awful balance 
and found wanting." 

At another time the question of evil com- 
munications and the corrupting of good 
manners thereby came up in young Rocke- 
feller's Sunday-school class. 

"Well," said he, "when I was at Brown 
University, though I did not smoke myself, 
I did not object to any one else smoking in 
my room. I had a reason for seeming thus 
to countenance the use of tobacco. 



" My grandmother thought that I was 
wrong in allowing those about me to do 
things of which I myself did not approve. 
But I said to her, 'Were I to raise an 
objection to their smoking they would go 
away from me and I could not approach 
them on drinking, gambling and other 
sins.' " 

That John D. Rockefeller, jr., has a 
sense of humor and knows how to tell a 
good story is proved by the mother-in-law 
joke which he made famous. It happened 
to be all the funnier to his hearers as the 
occasion was shortly after the lay preacher 
became a benedict. 

"This story," began Mr. Rockefeller, 
"has no relevancy to the occasion, but I 
will not let that deter me. A young man 
and his wife had lived for years, and not 
always pleasantly, with the wife's mother. 
At last the old lady died — or at least they 
thought she had died. 

" The pall-bearers carried her coffin 
down the front steps, and one of them 
slipped. The coffin struck a tree, the lid 
came off and then it was found that the 
mother-in-law had not died at all, but was 
only in a trance. 

"Well, she lived for some years after 
that, and then she died again — this time per- 
manently. And as the pall-bearers ap- 
proached the same tree at the foot of the 
steps the young man stopped weeping, 
turned to the man who had slipped and 
whispered, 'Be careful, Sam, don't slip 
this time.' " 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CURRENCY IN THE YUKON. 

UNITED STATES CONSUL H. D. 
SAYLOR reports from Dawson City, 
April 29, 1902, that a recent Order- 
in-Council changes the rate of royalty on the 
gold output of the Yukon Territory. The 
present rate is 5 per cent, on all the gold 
produced by any individual, exceeding a 
gross output of #5,000 per year. It is now 
intended to reduce the royalty to iyi per 
cent, with no exemption. The consul ex- 
plains that gold dust is generally used in 
that section to liquidate debts, and merchant- 
able gold dust, or dust thoroughly cleaned, 
is worth on an average $16 per ounce. 
Commercial dust is understood to mean 
a mixed dust of different creeks, 
adulterated with black sand or crushed 
white quartz, which is worth from $ 14 
to $15 per ounce. Every practical 
miner will, if his dust be above the average 
in value, sell it to the bank, buy commercial 
dust at an average of $15 per oz., and pay 
his creditors with it at the rate of $ 1 6 per 
oz. The merchant, on the other hand, 
receives for the dust, on exchanging it for 
currency, only about $14.75 per oz. As 
the large commercial houses are mainly 
American and buy their goods in the United 
States, they will be obliged, under the new 
order, to lose not only the discount of $1.25 
on the dust, but pay the export tax as well ; 
hence, they are endeavoring to force the 
dust out of circul ation. Already, the 
mechanics in many trades have refused to 
accept gold dust lor wages, and are now 
paid in currency. In order to put the Ter- 
ritory on a currency basis, if possible, the 
merchants have decided to accept, after 
May 1, 1902, merchantable dust at $15 
per oz., the merchant to pay the \y z per 
cent, export tax. 



ORDERS FOR SHELVING AND BOXES. 

Mr. Humphrey, 364 Queen street west, 
Toronto, is putting in a stock of hardware, 
and has purchased the necessary shelving 
from J. S. Bennett. Mr. Bennett is also in 
receipt of an order from Cote, Boivin & 
Cie, Chicoutimi, who had previously pur- 
chased screw-cases and shelf-boxes from 
him, for a large bolt.case ; from Rogers 
Hardware Co., Toronto Junction, for bolt 
and screw cases, and from C. R. Hoben & 
Co., Halifax, for a section of shelving com- 
plete with boxes. 



M. Perry, general merchant, Kirkfield, 
Ont., is advertising his business for sale. 

Charles Echlen, general merchant, Cedar 
Springs, Ont., has sold out to E. G. 
Hocker. 



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An improvement on the best. It eclipses all others. 

Dealers everywhere should not fail to have it in stock. 

It cleans and polishes Gold, Silver, Nickel, Brass, Copper, Bronze, Tin, Steel and 
Plated Ware, etc. 

Rust and dirt disappear, leaving a new lustre. Articles operated upon do not turn a 
greeny hue after being polished with YORK METAL POLISH. 

Contains no acids or grit. Therefore will not injure 
the article or the skin. 

Saves time, saves money, saves trouble, saves metal, sives your temper. Ahead of all other 
polishes. Buy it, try it, and get satisfaction. Put up in attractive tins. 

Manufactured by 

DOMINION BUTCHERS 1 SUPPLY CO. 

143 KINO STREET EAST, 



Samples and wholesale prices on application. 



"TORONTO 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 
HARVEST TOOLS 



Limited. 

ONLY 
WHOLESALE 




"Indian Pond" Scythe Stones. "Black Diamond" Scythe Stones. 

For Full Description Other Lines See Our Hardware Catalogue. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED, 



Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



Oraharo Nails are the Best. 

Factory: Dufferln Street, Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLY 

DEPARTMENT 



/ 



BALL BEARINGS IN COMMON 
ARTICLES. 

A BALL BEARING wheelbarrow is 
now on the American market. 
The ball cups are of 13 gauge cold 
rolled steel, stamped in one piece, and are 
referred to as being indestructible. Each 
one contains 12 bicycle balls, and also 
forms a clamp or metal band surrounding 
three sides of the handles, to which they are 
bolted to form a strong wheel attachment. 
The tray is alluded to as being much larger 
than commonly used, and as being hung on 
scientific principles, to throw much of the 
load directly over the wheel. It is so 
equalized and balanced, it is stated, that 
4}4 cubic feet of earth may be wheeled on 
the barrow with less effort than is required 
to handle half that quantity on ordinary 
dump barrows; also that all friction is 
removed and that the effort of pushing is 
lessened 50 per cent. The wheel is of 
steel, 16 inches in diameter, with i^-inch 
flat tire and ^-inch spokes shouldered and 
riveted. The hub is chilled and concaved 
on the ends where the balls race. 

The "Acme" ball-bearing castor is a 
bedpost castor made in brass, and nickel 
finish, to fit in a bed with 1, 1*4 and 2 in. 
post. Besides being non corrossive it is 
dust.prof, and practically indestructible. It 
is easily attached, and once on the post 
remains there. The weight falling directly 
over the centre of gravity, there is no 
chance of it breaking or getting out of order. 
The surface of the ball revolves upon the 
smaller balls, and moves in any direction 
with the slightest pressure. Either solid or 
hollow balls are supplied. The firm also 
make castors for all kinds of furniture, and, 
in fact, for anything and everything that 
moves on rollers. 

Roller-bearing truck and furniture castors 
are being introduced. The castors are 
either in polished brass for furniture and 
bedsteads, or in bronzed iron for bedsteads, 
trucks and similar purposes. It will be 
understood that the castor revolves upon a 
series of steel rollers or discs placed in an 
annular chamber, and carries the weight 
outside the centre of the main wheel. This 
gives an even bearing upon the circle of 
discs, and relieves all friction upon the pivot 
or strain upon the fastening screws. The 



parts are riveted together firmly, and free 
access is given to the screws through an 
opening in the plate. They have been 
thoroughly tested in past years on all classes 
of work, and are pronounced by the leading 
manufacturers of fine furniture, shopfitters, 
makers of warehouse trucks, and all who 
use castors to be the most satisfactory made. 
The iron castors can be obtained with either 
iron, lignum vita; or brass wheels. 

A DIVIDEND OF FOUR PER CENT. 

At the annual meeting of the Ottawa 
Electric Light Company last week it was 
decided to declare a dividend of not less 
than four per cent. Mr. Thomas Work- 
man was elected to the board of directors 
in place of the late Senator Clemow. 

LEASE THE HULL ELECTRIC ROAD 

It is stated on good authority that the 
Ottawa Electric Railway Company will 
lease the Hull Electric Railway for a term 
of five years. When the company secures 
control of the Quebec line the question of 
establishing a loop line and double track 
in Hull will be taken up. The facilities of 
the road will thus be greatly increased. 



A DELIVERY OF MACHINERY. 

Monday, June 23, 1902, was the occa- 
sion of the delivery of a car of farm mach- 
inery at St. Jerome from the Fro.«t & Wood 
Co., Limited, of Smith's Falls, Ont. A 
tour of the principal streets was made. The 
procession was made up of private carriages, 
binders, reapers, mowers and rakes, which 
made a procession of about half a mile in 
length. The farmers were banqueted and 
photographed. 

A REPORT ON FIRE ENGINES. 

At a meeting of the Montreal Fire Com- 
mittee, to decide upon the purchase of fire 
engines, on July 1, the report of the testing 
committee was received. The committee 
has tested the Waterous engine twice, and 
upon both occasions it was found to be 
satisfactory. Reports of these tests will be 
submitted by the experts at the next meet- 
ing of the committee on July 10. The 
committee also went to London to examine 



a Ronald engine, but it is said that no repre- 
sentative specimen of that make could be 
obtained for exhibition purposes. The 
committee, Aid. Richardson thinks, has 
thus no recourse but to purchase one at least 
of the Waterous engines. 



HINTS REGARDING ELECTRIC 
PLANTS. 

THE handling of electric light and 
power apparatus and line wires is 
always fraught with considerable 
danger. Rules will never remove the 
danger, but they often insure care. Hard- 
ware and Metal is indebted to President 
Morton, of Stevens' Institute of Technology, 
for the following suggestions and comments: 

1. Do not touch or handle any electric wire or 
apparatus of any sort while standing on the ground, 
or while in contact with any iron work, gas or 
water pipe, or stone or brick work, unless your 
hands are covered with rubber gloves, and you are 
provided with such properly insulated tools as have 
been declared to be safe and in good order by the 
electrician or other competent officer of this 
company. 

2. If it is at any time necessary to stand on the 
ground, or on any surface not insulated from the 
ground, while handling electric wires or apparatus, 
rubber boots or an insulated stool should be used. 

3. In moving wires, hanging on or lying over 
electric light wires, lamps or fixtures, use a dry 
hand line. 

4. Never handle any electric wire or apparatus 
with both hands at once when this can be avoided, 
and if it is necessary to do so be sure that no 
current is present, or that one or both hands are 
protected by rubber gloves or other efficient 
insulation. 

5. When handling line wires, treat each and 
every wire as if it carried a dangerous current, and 
under no circum tances allow yourself to make 
contact between two or more wires at the same 
time. 

6. Never open a circuit which has been in use 
without giving notice to the superintendent, or 
whoever is in charge, of your intention to do so, 
and at the same time request that the same line be 
opened at the main station and kept open until you 
have gi>en no ice that your work on that line has 
been completed. 

7. In the dynamo-room, never go near the bells 
or dynamos, nor touch any apparatus, unless you 
are fully informed and instructed how to do so. 

8. Tools used by linemen should be provided 
with insulated handles of hard rubber or other 
equally good insulator. It is the duty of each 
lineman to look after his own tools and see that 
they are in good o.der, especially as to their 
insulation. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



WANTED-- 



AN AGENT 
TO SELL 



Stocks, Dies and Taps and other En- 
gineers' Hand Tools and Platelayers' 
Tools to Hardware Faotors, Railroad 
Companies and Mines, on a commission 
basis. Apply, 

Easterbrook, Allcard & CO., 

LIMITED. 
SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 



BARGAINS IN SECOND-HAND BOILERS. 

HOKTZONTAL TUBULAR. 
No. 16098 72 in. x 189 in. 95 3}£-in. tubes 
No. 162 7 62 in. x 161 in. 96 3-in. " 
No. 16224 76 in. x 18S in. 78 4-in. " 
No. J 6232 64 in. x 18S in. 54 4-in. " 
No. 16122 44 in. x 141 in. 45 3-in. " 
No. 11932 22 in. x 66 in. 16 2^-ia. " 
LOCOMOTIVE FIRE BOX. 
No. If 625 48 in. x 204 in. 48 3-in. Uihcs 
No. 15812 36 in. x 142 in. 38 3-in. " 
No. 14921 27 in. x 102 in. 41 2-in. " 
No. 15791 26 in. x 106 in. 14 3-in. " 

PLAIN VERTICAL. 
No. 14885 28 in. x 44 in. 37 2-in. tubes 
No. 16056 30 in. x 96 in. 55 2-in. " 
No. 16064 22 in. x 49 in. 19 2-in. " 

VERTICAL SUBMERGED TUBULAR. 
No. 14705 55in.x 72 in. 110 2-in. tubes 
No. 15425 30in.x 84 in. 54 2-in. " 
No. 11039 43 in. x 96 in. 36 2-in. brass tubes. 

HEATING AND COOKING BOILERS. 
No 16126 No. 2 Petrie 19 in. x 43 in. 13 2-in. lubes 
No. 16104 No. 1 Petrie 19 in. x 40 in. 9 2-in. tubes 

Write for prices I also carry a full line of mill and 
engineers' supplies. 

H. W. PETRIE, 141-145 Front St. W., Toronto 



Blacksmiths' 

Hand 
Drills. 

The very 
best. 

B. JARDINE & CO. 
HESPELER, ONT. 




DIAMOND VISE AND DRILLING ATTACHMENT 



U.S. Patent Jan. 15, '95. Canadian Patent July 22, '95. 




JAWS are faced with steel % inch wide, 4 inches long, 

firmly fastened to jaw, checked and hardened. 
VISE weighs 38 pounds. DRILL weighs 13 pounds. 
For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 

Made by — 

The Adams Company, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
Made by A. R. Woodyatt & Co., Guelph, Ont. 




"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices , 




» 






James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



6. A. Crosby &. Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of~ 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses,*'^ 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 



STANYON ENGINEERING CO. 



402 MCKINNON BUILDINC, 



Phone Main 2177. 



-TORONTO 

CONTRACTING AND CONSULTING ENGINEERS. 

Steel Works, all kinds of Rolling Mills, Wire Mills, etc., all built complete. Machinery designed for any purpose 
General Offices, - PITTSBURG, Pa. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York : 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. Galvanized Plain Wire 

Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN AIR MOTOR FOR SOUTH 
POLE. 

A COUPLE of novel illustrations on 
this page show the latest use to 
which a wind-mill has been put. 
The Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 
of Toronto, have recently supplied one of 
their air motors to be erected on the deck 
of the steamship Discovery, bound on an 
exploration expedition to the South Pole. 
The air motor is to be used for furnishing 
light to the ship by driving the dynamo, 
thereby saving fuel and labor, and enabling 
the vessel to stay among the dreary waste 
of icebergs longer than any previous at- 
tempt. The promotors of this expedition 



who are now on strike will ever be taken 
back by the company. You can say that I 
am the authority for that statement. In a 
few days the places of the strikers will be 
filled, and everything in the shops will be 
booming. We have a lot of work ahead, 
and as soon as we can secure enough mach- 
inists we can turn out the engines very 
rapidly." 

DIED FOR HIS COMPANION. 

On Tuesday, July i, Dexter Griffiths was 
instantly killed by coming in contact with a 
live wire at the Cataract Power Co.' s works, 
about three miles from St. Catharines. Mr. 



selves as highly pleased with the operation 
of the machinery. 

A number of screw-cutting engine lathes, 
also a number of portable forges, with the 
accesssries for a manual training depart- 
ment, will be furnished to the McMaster 
University, Woodstock, Ont., by H. W. 
Petrie, Toronto, who has secured the cone 
tract. 

The McLachlan Gasoline Engine Co., 
Limited, 201 Queen street east, Toronto, 
have just completed a beautiful 5HP, gas- 
oline engine for D. D. Woods, of New 
Orleans, to be used on Sparrow Lake. This 
company will ship on July 10 an engine to 
be exhibited at the Manitoba Exhibition in 





Air Motor on Board Ship. 

figure that the wind engine will pay for 
itself during the trip. 

The Ontario Wind Engine and Pump 
Co. have receptly completed a large addi- 
tion to their building in Toronto, to meet 
the demands of their increasing business. 
Their galvanizing department, in which 
hardware merchants are interested, is splen- 
didly equipped and has radidly sprung into 
popular favor. 

NOT ONE WILL BE TAKEN BACK. 

Hon. Wm. Harty, president of The Can- 
adian Locomotive Companv, which has rec- 
ently had a strike by its machinists, said 
on June 29 : " Not one of the machinists 



Air Motor on Board Ship — A Close View. 



Griffiths was killed in an attempt to rescue 
his companion, Mr. Higgins. Mr. Higgins 
escaped with a severe shock. 

MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES. 

A complete sawmill outfit was shipped 
on June 30 to Samuel Hausuld & Co., 
Temiscaming, Ont., by H. W. Petrie, 
Toronto. 

A No. 7 Jewel automatic engine and 50- 
h. p. fire-box boiler, also a double cylinder 
hoisting engine and boiler, were installed 
in the cement plant of the estate of John 
Battle at Thorold, Ont., by H. W. Petrie, 
Toronto. The Battle Co. express them- 



connection with a portable grain elevator* 
They will also ship on July 5 one 5 h.p. 
engine for Mr. Krebs, vice-president of the 
W. A. Stickney Cigar Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
This will be used at Collingwood, Ont. 



MARITIME BOARD OF TRADE. 

At a council of the Maritime Board of 
Trade held at Truro on June 19, it was 
decided to recommend the appointment of 
a permanent secretary of the board. The 
matter of freight and passenger traffic on 
the Bay of Fundy shore was discussed. It 
was decided to make shipping a prominent 
feature of discussion at the annual meeting. 
The annual meeting of the Maritime Board 
of Trade will be held at Sydney. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



KNOX HENRY 



Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32 Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application.; 

Brand Horse - Nails 



HORSE NAILS-" C" 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS - Gunn 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Castor Co. 



WATERBURY 
E W d BRASS CO. 

Main Office and Mills at Watcrbury, Conn. 

New York Store, No. 122 to No. 130 Centre St. 
Providence Store, No. 131 Dorrance St. and 

No. 152 Eddy St. 

Pope's Island "White" 

and 

"Gold lon-Coiiosive Metal " 



THE 



DANDY SHINER 

(nickel plated) 
A HOUSEHOLD NECESSITY 




Suitable for Spinning, Drawing, Stamp- 
ing and Jewelers' Work. 

Brass, German Silver, Bronze and 
Copper in Sheets, Wire Rods, Brazed 
and Seamless Tubing. Metallic Eyelets, 
Shells, Ferrules and small brass wares 
of every description. 



Holds shoe rigid. Fits any shoe. 3 lasts (men's, 
women's, child's) go with each shiner. 

Write for wholesale price to 

L. H. Packard & Co., Montreal. 



THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 

Manufacturers of 
I, 2, 3 Bushel 

Grain 

AND 

Root 




B askets 

THE DAKVILLE 
BASKET CO, 



THE BELLEVILLE BUSINESS COLLEGE, LIMITED 

BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO. 

fully describing all Courses taught. ° J- A* nth J efterS, M.A., rnnClpai. 



WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very J 
■ liberal. A trial order solicited. Write for discounts. 



s. 



99 Niagara St., TORONTO FILE CO. 

CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS. 



s. 



A Good Reputation 

A Good Past 

A Good Present 

A Good Future 

Hardware and Metal 

Montreal and Toronto 

And all over Canada 

Once a week 

Carries Lots of Advertising 

Because 

It pays Advertisers 



Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 



BURMAN & SONS' cuppers 

Es UblfchedxS,, BIRMINGHAM, ENG. ^VM^. 



10. 297. 




NO. 3 POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint." 

{The Czar of Russia. 
The King of Denmark. 
Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 



Having bought the good-will, 
machinery and stock of Wm. Bown, 
Limietd, we shall in future supply the 
Celebrated " Newmarket " Clipper, 
marked exactly as before, with the 
addition of " Made by Burman & Sons, 
Limited, Birmingham " on the handles. 
Largest makers of Horse Clippers in 
the world. 




THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts ever three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

To be obtained from all the principal Jobbers throughout 
the Dominion. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 



A NEW 
CANADIAN 

INDUSTRY 



Calcium carbide will shortly 
be manufactured on a large 
scale at Shawinigan Falls, 
Que., where conditions are said to be better 
than any available place elsewhere in Can- 
ada. The use of this compound for the 
generation of acetylene gas, and many 
other purposes, is increasing rapidly, and a 
strong company has been organized to 
manufacture it on a large sale at the above 
place. The new enterprise is called The 
Shawinigan Carbide Co., and it will shortly 
issue 7 per cent, bonds to the extent of 
$300,000. A successful future for the com- 
pany is looked for, and these bonds are 
expected to be readily subscribed. The 
issue of bonds will be offered through The 
National Trust Co., Limited, and amongst 
the directorate of the company are Walter 
Bar wick and H. C. Osborne, both of 
Toronto. 

Work is being commenced 
5It R ZL» 8 - « b y Messrs. Wm. Mackenzie 

THE NEW Nb. 

railway. and D. D. Mann on the 

new railway they are to 
build between Halifax and Yarmouth, N.S. 
Work will be started at Mahone Bay. and 
the section between that place and Halifax, 
60 miles in length, will be the first built. 

Mr. Mann is accountable for the state- 
ment that passenger trains in a couple of 
weeks will be running over the Canadian 
Northern from Port Arthur to Winnipeg. 
All the cars and equipment for that section 
of the line have been completed and 250 
miles more will be built this season. The 
Saskatchewan is not expected to be reached 
before 1903. 

Ten thousand tons of steel rails have 
been purchased by Messrs. Mackenzie & 
Mann from James Cooper, of Montreal, 
and the same quantity from the Clergue 
works at Sault Ste. Maiie. These, in all, 
would lay 200 miles. 



TO MAKE 
SILICATE 
BRICK. 



The Montreal Silicate Brick 
Co. has been granted letters 
patent to manufacture build- 
ing and paving brick in that 
city. At a meeting of shareholders last 
week the officers were elected for the 
ensuing year. They are : President, David 
Robertson ; vice-president and managing 
director, Geo. J. Sheppard; directors, Hon. 
Senator Kirchhoffer, Brandon, Man.; Alfred 
Joyce, Chas. W. Trenholm and John Mc- 
Lean. 

A factory will be built shortly in Mont- 
real. The owners of the patent rights of 
this brick are some Montreal capitalists. 
Companies have already been formed at 



Toronto, Vancouver, St. John's, Nfld., and 
in Nova Scotia and Cape Breton ; and it is 
expected that, on account of the simplicity 
of the process of manufacturing this brick, 
and its fine appearance and wearing quali- 
ties, it will become an important factor in 
the building trades. 



sixty years, and are made to stand the test 
of use in Canadian winters. The firm 
makes many styles of axes, and is prepared 
to make a sample to suit any market. 



GODDESS TO GRACE A POPCORN 
STAND. 

The Chicago House Wrecking Co. are 
tearing down the buildings of the Pan- 
American Exposition. The Government, 
the Agricultural, the Manufactures and the 
Horticultural buildings are practically de- 
molished. Work is now proceeding rapidly 
on the Machinery Building and the Electric 
Tower. ■ ' The Goddess of Light " is to come 
down from the tower shortly as the pur- 
chasers are anxious to get her to grace a 
popcorn stand in Cleveland, Ohio. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

THE Canada Hardware Co., Limited, 
have issued a catalogue and price 
list of their spring and summer 
goods, including wringers, pumps, shovels, 
spades, picks, wire rope, etc. It is hand- 
somely bound in heavy cover paper. 
It is fully illustrated with large, clearly- 
printed cuts of the different goods. Below 
each is the description and price. The 
names of the articles are given in both 
French and English. This is likely the 
only catalogue of its kind in Canada in 
which both languages are used, and it 
speaks well for the pains the company has 
gone to in order to produce a catalogue, 
perfect in all particulars. The first part of 
the catalogue is devoted to harvest tools, 
garden and lawn tools, grindstones, etc., 
and an immense assortment of all these 
goods is shown. Screen doors, window 
screens, screen-door catches, pulls and 
spring hinges, of all descriptions and at all 
prices, follow. Then come ice cream 
freezers, ice tongs, etc. Some very fine 
adjustable chairs, folding cots, hammocks, 
etc., are shown. A good portion of the 
catalogue is devoted to washing machines, 
wringers, churns, pumps and such articles, 
and the last part deals with spades and 
shovels of all kinds, wheelbarrows and 
jacks. This catalogue should be in every 
dealer's hands. All will find it useful. 

AN AXE FIRM'S CATALOGUE. 

The Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont., 
have just issued a catalogue of their axes 
that is handsomely illustrated with the 
different styles made by the firm. These 
axes have been on the market for over 



BUSINESS AND HOME LIFE. 

By Col. George Rathbone Dwyer. 

NO business man likes worry, but it h> 
an inseparable part of his existence. 
He need not look for worry ; it inevit- 
ably comes to him. To worry about one's 
business, and then in a moment forget it 
all, is absolutely impossible. It is not in 
human nature to be able to do so. The 
average busy man assuredly wishes it were. 

A man's home is what he lives and works 
for, and the greatest pleasure he has in life 
is to go home and forget the worries, great 
or small, which are the heritage of the 
business man. 

A man's business is his own and that of his 
business associates, and though he cannot 
help thinking, he can certainly help talking. 

It is a breach of confidence for a man to 
discuss his business affairs with anyone, 
save only those who are personally inter- 
ested. 

He goes to his office in the morning and 
transacts his business throughout the day, 
and as soon as the office door closes behind 
him he ceases, theoretically speaking, to be 
a business man. 

His uptown life and his downtown life are 
quite distinct. He does not permit the former 
to interfere with the latter, and what is sauce 
for the goose should be sauce for the gander. 

In my opinion, a man has no right at all 
to discuss business matters at home. 

A business man has quite sufficient to 
think about during the day and quite enough 
matters to discuss without doing so all the 
evening as well. 

Besides, the strain of business in these 
days of competition and hustle is so severe 
that it would be highly detrimental to him 
physically were he not to enjoy the relaxa- 
tion which his home affords. He goes home 
to rest, not to work ; and though the im- 
pressions left upon his mind by the events 
of the day cannot be entirely obliterated at 
home, yet they can be so associated with 
other more pleasant thoughts that they cease 
to worry. 

Office life is one phase of a man's exist- 
ence and home life is another ; each has its 
own sphere, from which it should never be 
permitted to stray. 



THE GURNEY CO.'S EXCURSION. 

The annual excursion of the employes of 
The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, To- 
ronto, will be held on Friday next, July 11, 
to Niagara Falls. The steamer Garden 
City, carrying the excursionists, will leave 
the Yonge street wharf at 8 a.m. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



Our stock of goods for the spring trade is 
now complete, and we can fill all orders promptly 
on the following lines : 

Wire, Nails, Cordage, Window 
Glass, White Lead, Paints, Whit- 
ing, Churns, Linseed Oil, Spades 
and Shovels, Screen Doors, Wove 
Wire, Poultry /Setting, Builders' 
Hardware, Guns and Sporting 
Goods. Finest stock in the 
Province of Cutlery. 

Prompt Shipment. Prices Right. 



DOMINION 

Wire Manufacturing Company, Limited 



Head Office 

MONTREAL 

Que. 




Branch Office 

TORONTO 

Ont. 



... - — - 



Annealed, 

Oiled and Annealed, 

Bright, 

Bright Spring, 

Coppered, 

Coppered Spring, 

Brass, Brass Spring, 

Copper, Tinned and 

Galvanized WIRES. 



Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws. 
Jack Chain. 
Cotter Pins. 
Bright Wire Goods. 
Door Pulls. 
" Crescent " 
Coat and Hat Hooks 
Tinned Bottling 
Wires. 



Fence, Poultry Netting, Bed and Blind Staples. 

COPPER AND GALVANIZED WIRE 

For Telegraph and Telephone Lines. 





LOCkS and 

Builders' Hardware. 

We have a most complete line of all these goods, including the 
very newest ideas in 

Bronze and Brass Knobs, 

Door Sets and Escutcheons. 



LOCKS AND LATCHES OF ALL KINDS. 

Any dealer asking for a catalogue will be sent full prices, discount sheets, etc., etc. Drop a card. 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 



»gtjfri 



INCORPORATED 1893. 



The Ourncy-Tilden Co., L 

Hamilton. Toronto. Montreal. 



IMITED 



AGENCIES J ST. JOHN, N. B., VANCOUVER, B, C. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July 1. 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

OWING to the holidays, observed 
and postponed, business has 
been somewhat upset. Apart 
trom the increased business of one or 
two days, on account of the holiday on 
July I, trade throughout the week has 
been somewhat quiet. In accordance 
with the advance in builders' hardware, 
which we reported sonic time ago, local 
(inns have advanced the prices on Yale 
night latches, and for No. 12 are now 
quoting §17.45 per dozen. Barn door 
tracks have taken a further advance, the 
price now being $3.90 instead of $3.50, 
per Kill feet. The strike of the moulders 
in the United States has made itself felt 
in spme lines of hardware litre. Cast 
iron hollow ware, for instance, has be- 
come quite scarce on the market for the 
present. Cordage was reduced another 
V. on Wednesday. 

SCYTHES.— There is no particularly 
striking feature to this market this week. 
Trade moves along at a fair pace, and 
the prices quoted remain unchanged, as 
follows : Lance. No. 80, $5.50 ; Hurd's 
Clipper. $6.50 ; concave, $7.50 ; Sibley, 
88.50 ; Cradle scythes, cast steel, $8.50 ; 
silver steel, $9.50 ; " Harvest King," 
§10.50. Bush scythes, $6.50. 



BARB WIRE.— The inquiry is light, 
most of the business doing being for 
sorting purposes. The price is $3 per LOO 
lt>. f.o.b. Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— The demand for 
this article has not improved, and the 
week's trade has been quiet. We quote : 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45 ; No. 9, 
$2.80 ; No. 10, $3.55 ; No. 11, $3.65 ; No. 
12, $2.95; No. 13, $3.05; No. 14, $4.05; 
No. 15, $4.55; No. 16, $4.80; No. 17, 
$5.20 ; No. 18, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— The market 
is not active^ No quotable change lias 
occurred. We quote as follows : Bright 
iron and annealed on a base of 
$2.60 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal, To- 
ronto, Halifax, London, Hamilton and 
St. John. Net extras per 100 lb. are 
as follows : Coppered wire, 60c; tinned 
wire, $2 ; oiling, 10c; spring wire, $1.25 ; 
best steel wire, 75c; bright soft drawn, 
15c; special hay-baling wire, 30c 

FINE WIRE.— This is moving out 
slowly at unchanged prices. The dis- 
count remains at 22| per cent. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE— There 
has been nothing of importance in this 
market during the week, and trade con- 
tinues quiet at unchanged prices. The 
discount is 60 per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES.— No change has 
occurred. The demand for staples is over 
for the season, and except for sorting 



ittle 



quote as follows : $2.9Xj 
25 f< 1 1 



purposes there 

being done. \V 

per 100-lb. keg for bright, and 

galvanized. 25 and 50 lb. packages, Joe 

extra. 

WIRE NAILS. — There is a good steady 
demand for wire nails at unchanged pri- 
ces. In small lots $2.55 is charged, and 
in carlots, the price is $2.50, f.o.b. Mont- 
real. London, Hamilton. Toronto, Gan- 
anoque, Branttord. Windsor, Out., St. 
John and Halifax. 

CUT NAILS.— The market is steady 
under an active inquiry. The price dt 
cut nails, in carlots, is S-J.:',7.\ per keg, 
and in small lots, $2.45 per keg. The dis- 



and 



,;u 



count on Hour barrel and coopers nails 
is III per cent. 

HORSE NAILS— The market is in 
about the same condition. Only a light 
inquiry is experienced, and trade, Gener- 
ally, is quiet. The discounts are as 
follows: "C" brand, 50 and 1\ per cent, 
oil ; " M " brand, for " Oval " and "New 
City " heads, 60 per cent, off, and for 
" New Countersunk " heads, 66 2-3 per 
cent. off. "Monarch" horse nails are also 
discounted at 66 2-3 per cent. 

HORSESHOES.— Nothing new has oc- 
curred in this market. There is little 
demand for horseshoes. The prices are 
unchanged. We quote as follows ; Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 
and larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller, 




" Famous Magnet " 
Furnaces 



For Wood only. Portable or Brick Setting. 

MADE IN 17 STYLES AND SIZES. 

We have unsolicited letters from 
every part of Canada testifying 
to the success of this furnace. 

See our new catalogue, just issued, 
for full particulars. 



The McClary Manufacturing Co., 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

"Everything for the Tinshop" 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



ENGLISH 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 

FIRE 

building 
enamelled 
Silica 
magnesia 

DRAIN 
CULVERT 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



BRICKS. 



} PIPES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER PIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

ruE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, OUT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 



BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



u 



MIDLAND 



» 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writs for Prlco* to Sales Area t» 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. UmHH 



§3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
§3.75 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4.00 ; X L 
steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, §3.60 ; No. I and smaller, $3.85 ; 
feather - weight, all sizes, §4.85 ; toe 
weight, steel shoes, all sizes, §5.95 f.o.h. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. extra. 

SCREWS.— There has been n<> abato- 
mi'iil in the demand for screws, which are 
still moving out rapidly at steady prices. 
No change in the discounts has been 
made. We quote them as follows : 
Round head bright, 82^ and H* per cent.; 
flat head bright, 87^ and in per cent.; 
brass, round heads, 75 and III per cent.: 
brass, Hat heads. 80 and 111 per cent. 

BOLTS.— The market for bolts is quite 
satisfactory. Jobbers report an active 
demand, and no change in the prices has 
occurred, and the discounts are as 
follows : Norway carriage bolts, 55 per 
cent.; common, 50 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 55 per cent.; machine 
bolts, 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws. 
()(> 2-3 per cent.; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 and 
5 per cent.; blank bolts, 50 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 50 and 5 per cent.; 
plough bolts, 50 and 5 per cent. To any 
retailer an extra discount of 10 per cent, 
is allowed. Tire bolts, 67£ per cent. ; 
stove bolts, 67^ per cent. Nuts, square. 
3| per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 3Jc. 
per ttj. off list. To all retailers an extra 
discount of %c. per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER.— Considerable ac- 
tivity prevails in the market for building- 
paper, all (dasses moving out well. The 
market is firm, and prices are well main- 
tained all round. Quotations follow : 
Tarred felt, §1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
readv roofing, 85c. per roll ; 3- ply, §1.10 
per roll ; carpet felt, §2.25 per 100 tb.: 
dry sheathing, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll: 
tarred fibre, 60c. pur roll ; K and I X 
L, 65c. per roll : heavy straw sheathing, 
§30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c. per roll. 

CORDAGE .^Another reduction has 
been made this week. manila, British 
manila. sisal, and lathyarn each being 
quoted \c. lower. The demand is small. 
In binder twine prices are quite firm, and 
it is reported that stocks are now pretty 
well sold up. Our quotations are 
now as follows : Manila, 15c; British 
manila. 13c; sisal. 1'2.lc: lathyarn. lie. 
Prices on binder twine are as follows : 
Blue Ribbon, 650 feet to the pound, 15c; 
Redcat, 600 feet to the pound, 14c. ; 
Tiger. 550 feet to the pound, 13c. ; 
Standard, 500 feet to the pound, IHc: 
sisal. 500 feet to the pound, 1 l^c Prices 
are subject to a rebate of £c. in carload 
lots. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— In this line 
everything has been quiet and unci. :tn 
ged. Our quotations are as follows : 
Best iron rivets, section carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 
and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
with the usual proportion of burrs, 45 
and 10 per cent, off, and coppered iron 
rivets and burrs, in 5-tb. carton boxes, 
are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, off 
list. 

SCREEN AVI RE CLOTH— There is a 
moderate inquiry for this, and business 
is still being done at §1.37^ per lllll 
square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING— Trade in boul 
try netting is of a very active character. 
The demand, however, such as it is, is 
steady, and a fair trade is doing with 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

WIRE. 

WIRE RODS, FENCING WIRE, TELE- 
GRAPH WIRE, SPRING WIRE, COILED 
WIRE FOR FENCING, WIRE NETTING, 
WOVEN FENCING, Etc., Etc. 

Import orders for wholesale buyers only. 



509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 

THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited, 

GALT, ONT. 

Manufacturers of 

Iron and Brass 

PUMPS 

FOR ALL SERVICES. 

FORCE PUMPS, 
LIFT PUMPS, 
CISTERN PUMPS, 
HAND OR POWER 
PUMPS 

OF ALL KINDS. 

Catalogue for the asking. 

OUR MOTTO: "The test 
quality and right prices." 

We offer for Prompt Shipment- 
Pig Iron, 

No. 1 "Carnbroe ' 
No. 3 Mlddlesbro 




g 



Straits 
Lamb & Flag 



Ingot Copper, 

"M. Sc A." and "Lake' 

Lead, 
Antimony. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., d-im 

HEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturer* o f 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTTH 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



= Elastilite 
Varnish 



sold up to date this year than dur- 
ing any previous twelve months 
since we introduced it. "Reason?" 
There never has been, there is not now, and we 
doubt if there ever will be a Varnish put up, 
either by domestic or foreign makers, equal to 
Elastilite for the same money. 

In tins only, from Spirits to i gallon. 



ii- in "Hi n-| 


*uON| 


OUAAT*. 


»• Enfmoi 


iVrYttol 

MM f]B 


»¥«A*\l£^ 




» Ceu>« 


• ui Vaiwiiii 


1 .o.c.o -r - w 

1 -~ <*«*«V — - 


L-_ , , 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



The 



Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 

Toronto, Ont., Canada. 



LIMITED 



Canadian Agents for Buehne's"Red, White and Blue" Brand Steel Wool. 



A great deal could be written about "Ark Brand" 
Paint, but it would all boil down to the following 
facts that 

"Ark Brand" 
Paint 

is the choice of the Canadian trade because : 

It is a sure seller. 

The dealer knows he is giving value. 

Nothing is said by us but what is backed by a 
guarantee. 

Its good points have gained for it a reputation 
which sells it where honest paint is wanted. 

Write to-day and arrange for the agency if we 
have not a representative in your town. 



*»' 



FRANCIS-FROST CV. 



ited 



TORONTO. 



Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



some houses. Canadian or English net- 
ting is discounted as follows: 2 x 2 
mesh. 19 wire, 50 and 10 per cent.; 2 x 2 
mesh, heavier wire, 50 per cent. Can- 
adian list used. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— These continue to 
move out rapidly. The discount is un- 
changed from (50 per cent. 

FIREBRICKS— The quiet season is 
now on and but a small demand is ex- 
perienced. The price of English firebricks 
is $16 to $22 per 1,000, and of Scotch, 
$17 to $22 per 1,000. 

CEMENT.— This market moves along 
quietly and at unchanged prices. Our 
quotations are : Canadian cement. 
$1.90 to $2.25; German, $2.20 to $2.30; 
English, $2.15 to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 
to $1.95 per bbl. ex-wharf, and Amer- 
ican, $2.10 to $2.20 ex-cars. 
METALS. 

The demand for metals has kept up re- 
markably well, and although the furnaces 
and mills are working their hardest, there 
is no accumulation of stocks. Structural 
Bteel is in excellent demand. The demand 
lor pit;' iron is also as great as ever, 
stove manufacturers, machinists, manu- 
facturers of agricultural implements, etc., 
being unable t" obtain their necessary 

supplies. 

PIG IRON. Tins is in great demand, 
but the difficulty of obtaining anything 
like immediate deliveries continues very 
marked. Canadian sells at $18.50 to $19, 
and Summerlee, at $21.50 to $22. 

BAR IKON. There is a good steady de- 
mand for bar iron, though no quotable 
change has occurred. Horseshoe iron 
ell i,,r $2.20, and merchants' bar, for 
$2. 



BLACK SHEETS.— This line is still 
quiet and at unchanged prices, and we 
quote as follows : 28 gauge, $2.65 ; 26 
gauge, $2.60 ; 20 to 24 gauge, $2.50, and 
8 to 20 gauge, $2.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON.— There has been 
no important change in this market, and 
we quote as follows : No. 28, Queen's 
Head, $4.40 ; Apollo, 10f oz., $4.40 ; 
Fleur de Lis, $4.15 ; Comet, $4.25 ; "Bell" 
brand, $4.30. For less than case lots 
10c. extra is charged. 

INGOT COPPER.— There is not much 
doing, and the price remains at 14c.- 

INGOT TIN.— There is a firmer feeling 
reported in pig tin, but no advance has 
been made. Some delaers, however, are 
looking for higher prices. Straits is 
quoted at 33^c. 

PIG LEAD; — Business in pig lead is 
quiet, and the price remains at $3.25. 

LEAD PIPE.— There is a moderate in- 
quiry for lead pipe. The price of com 
position and waste is 8c, and of ordin- 
ary, 7c. The discount is 37£ per cent. 

IRON PIPE— No quotable change has 
occurred during the week, but business is 
still brisk, and our quotations are as 
follows : Black pipe, i, $3 ; £, $2.40 ; g, 
$2.65; i, $3; |, $3.70; 1-in., $5.25; 1£, 
$7.40; U-, $8.90; 2-in., $12.40. Galvan- 
ized, i, $3.20 ; I, $3.45 ; i, $4 ; £ , $5.05 ; 
1-in., $7.25 ; 1J, $10.10 ; H, $12.15 ; 2-in., 
$16.70. Extra heavy pipe, plain ends, 
are quoted, per 100 ft., as follows: Black, 
4, $4.35 ; a, $5.30 ; 1-in., $7.60 ; lj, $10.- 
60 ; H, $12.70 ; 2-in., $17.45. Galvanized, 
i, $5.35 : J, $6.70 ; 1-in., $9.60 : 1}, $13.- 
30; H, $15.95; 2-in., $21.75. For 
threads and couplings 5 per cent, is 
added, 



TINPLATES.— There is a fair demand 
this week for tinplates. The market has 
been steady. Charcoals sell for $4.7"> I i 
$5.25 per box, and cokes at $4.25 per 
box. 

CANADA PLATES.— A good business is 
doing in Canada plates at the prices we 
quote. Galvanized plates continue to 
move exceptionally well. No important 
change has taken place in the market. 
Our quotations are as follows : 52's, 
$2.70 to $2.80 ; 60's, $2.85 to $2.90 ; 75s. 
$2.80 to $2.85 ; full polished, $3.75, and 
galvanized, $4.25 to $4.35 ; galvanized, 
60's, $4.45 to $4.55. 

STEEL.— The demand for steel keeps 
up. and a good business is reported. Our 
((notations are as follows : Sleigbshoe, 
$2.10; tire, $2.20; bar, $2.05 ; spring. 
$2.85 ; reeled machinery, $2.75 ; toecalk, 
$2.70. 

SHEET STEEL.— This article moves 
out somewhat slowly. No quotable 
changes have occurred. We quote as fol 
lows : Nos. 10 to 20, $2.50 ; 3-16, $2.50 : 
{. 5-16 and f, $2.40. 

TOOL STEEL.— This market shows 
signs of improvement. Several fairly 
good orders were received during !!;■ 
week. Prices arc steady and unchanged 
We quote as follows: Black Diamond, 
8c; Sanderson's, 8 to 12c, according to 
grade ; Jessop's, 13c; Leonard's, 7-Jc; 
Jonas & Colver's, 8 to 15c; " Air Hard- 
ening," 30 to 50c. 

TERNE PLATES.— Nothing of import 

ance IS to be reported in this market. 
Trade is uuiel. and the price is S7.50. 

COIL CHAIN.— The activity in this 
market still continues at unchanged 
prices. Our quotations are as fol- 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



lows : No. 6, 12ic; No. 5, 10^c; No. 1, 
10c; No. 3, 9$c; £-inch, 7£c. per lb.; 
5-16, §5 ; 5-16 exact, §5.25 ; f , §4.25 ; 
7-16, 34.05 ; £, §3.95 ; 9-16, §3.85 ; f , 
§3.55 ; |, §3.50 ; g, §3.45 ; 1-inch, §3.45. 
In carload lots an allowance of 10c. is 
made. 

SHEET ZINC— The price of this re- 
mains at §5.85 to §6.25. Trade, how- 
ever, is quiet, 
"ft ANTIMONY.— There has been no im- 
provement in the demand for antimony. 
The price is still 10c. 

ZINC SPELTER.— Business is quiet. 
The price of spelter is 5c. 

SOLDER. — The market continues fairly 
active, and a satisfactory trade is doing 
in both bar and wire solder. The former 
sells for 18c, and wire solder, for 20c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The feature of the week in this line is 
(he decline of -v. in linseed oil, raw being 
now quoted at 82c, and boiled at 85c. 
The arrivals of oil from abroad were the 
cause of the easing off of the market. 
Still, it must not be inferred that there 
is any great excess of stock, for the de- 
mand is still very heavy, and as quickly 
as it arrives it finds purchasers. The 
market in the general list of paint mate- 
rials is somewhat quieter this week, and 
the manufacturers are not working as 
hard as they were a few weeks ago. Tur- 
pentine has been steady, and the price 
has not been changed. Yellow ochres are 
reported to be much firmer, and one 
brand, the " J.C.", French ochre, is 
practically out of the market, owing to 
the keen advance at the source of sup- 
ply. We quote : 

WHITE LEAD.— Best brands, Govern- 
ment standard, §5.87^ ; No. 1, §5.50 ; 
No. 2, §5.12^ ; No. 3, §4.75 ; No. 4, 
§4.374 all f-o.b. Montreal. 

DRY WHITE LEAD.— §5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, §5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— Pure dry, 6£c ; 
No. 1, 5£c; in oil, pure, 7£c; No. 1, 
6|.; No. 2, 5£c 

PUTTY.-We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
§1.90 per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantitv, 
§2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., §2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200-Ib. kegs or boxes, 
§2.40 ; in tins, §2.55 to §2.65 ; in less 
than 100-lb. lots, §3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c higher, 
f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL.-Casks, 7c; 100- 
tb. kegs, 7£c; smaller quantities, 8£c. 

RED LEAD. — Genuine red lead, in casks, 
§4.50 ; in 100-lb. kegs, §4.75 ; in less 
quantities, §5.75 per 100 lb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, §4.25 ; kegs, §4.50, and 
smaller quantities, §5.50. 

LITHARGE. — Ground, casks, 5c ; less 
quantities, 5^c; flake litharge, casks, 
§5.25 ; smalls, §5.75 per 100 tb. 

I.I \ SEED OIL— Raw, 82c; boiled, 85c 

in 5 to 9 barrels, lc less. Terms, net 

tffeash in 30 days. Delivered in Ontario, 

between Montreal and Oshawa, at 2c per 

gal ion advance, and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE. -Single barrels, 72c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 71c Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 

SHELLAC VARNISH.— Pure white, 
§2.35 to §2.45 ; orange, §2.25 to §2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS.— §1.20 to §1.45 per 
gallon. 

CASTOR OIL— 8 % to 9£c in wholesale 
lots, and $c. additional foi small lots. 



fi 




Both Ornamental and Practical. 

WE MAhl ALL KINDS OF ARCHITECTURAL 
SHEET METAL WORK. 

Fanciful designs for effective finish in any desired style, as well as 
every variety of fireproof metal covering, suited to old and new buildings 
of any and every description. 

Our goods are foremost among practically popular lines for decora- 
tive finish and superior utility — their reliable merit fully proved by con- 
clusive tests. 

METALLIC CEILINGS SHINGLES CORNICES SIDINGS 

SKY LIGHTS VENTILATORS LATHING 

CORRUGATED IRON FANCY EMBELLISHMENTS 

Consult our catalogue for full information about these many lines, and be 
ready for all the business in your locality. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited, 

Wholesale Manufacturers. TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 

Ci ■d'£i <&4L <& *£i <j 4L<;u 




SEAL OIL— 48 to 50c 

COD OIL— 35 to 37£c. 

PARIS GREEN.— Petroleum, bbls., 
16fc per lb.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 
100-lb. drums, 17£c; 25-lb. drums, 18c; 
1-Ib. packages, 18£c; £-lb. packages, 
20£c; l-tb. tins, 19£c; £-lb. tins, 21^0. 
f.o.h. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of de- 
livery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

This market has been quiet and feature- 
less during the week. On account of the 
holidays some decrease in the volume of 
business is reported. No quotable 
change has occurred with the exception 
of rubbers, which are a shade lower this 
week. Our quotations are as fol- 
lows : Heavy copper and wire, lO^c per 
lb.; light copper, 8c; heavy red brass, 
10^c; heavy yellow, 9c; light brass, 5c; 
lead, 2 to 2£c; zinc, 2£c; iron No. 1, 
wrought, §15 ; No. 2, §7 per ton ; ma- 
chinery scrap, §16 ; stove plate, §12 ; 
malleable and steel, §5 ; mixed country 
rags, GO to 70c per 100 lb. ; old rubbers, 
6 to 6£c. per tt). 

GLASS. 

There is nothing new to report. Trade 
is very quiet as is usual at this season. 
We quote : First break, 50 feet, §2.10 ; 
second, §2.20 for 50 feet ; first break, 100 
feet, §4 ; second break, §4.20 ; third 
break, §4.70 ; fourth break, §4.95. 

HIDES. 

The market has been fairly steady 
throughout the week. A good demand 
continues at unchanged prices. We now 
quote as follows: No. I hides, 10c; No. 2, 
9c; No. 3, 8c No. 1 calfskins, 12c ; 
sheepskins, 70c; lambskins, 25c per lb. 

MONTREAL NOTES. 

Linseed oil is 2c lower. 

Cordage has been reduced another ^c. 

Barn door tracks have risen 40c per 
100 feet. 

Yale night latches have been advanced 
in price to §17.45 per dozen for No. 42. 



ONTARIO MARKETS 

Toronto, July 4, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

BUSINESS in general for this time 
of the year continues active, and 
what now is doing is principally 
of a sorting-up nature. There is a good 
movement in harvest, tools, and in the 
small sizes of ropes is displayed some 
activity. The prices of rope have de- 
clined £c. all round during the week. The 
only other change is in coppe*- rivets, 
which have advanced, the extra discount 
of l<> per cent, being now withdrawn. The 
demand for lawn mowers is smaller than 
it was, but the movement in guns and 
ammunition has increased. The cement 
market remains firm at the advance of 
last week, but the movement has not 
been so free as heretofore. 

BARB WIRE.— Trade is keeping up well 
and the prices are steady. We quote §2. 7~i 
for less than carlots f.o.b. Cleveland, and 
§2.(55 for carlots. From stock, Toronto, 
$3.00. 

GALVANIZED WIRE— There continues 
to be a fair sorting-up trade doing in 
this line. Quotations are : Nos. (i, 7 
and 8, §3.50 to §3.85 per 100 lb., accord- 
ing to quantity ; No. 9, §2.85 to §3.15 ; 
No. 10, §3.00 to §3.95 ; No. 11, §3.70 to 
§4.10 ; No. 12, §3 to §3.30 ; No. 13, §3.10 
to §3.40 ; No. 14, §4.10 to §4.50 ; No. 15, 
§4.60 to §5.50 ; No. 16, §4.85 to §5.35. 
Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. Cleveland are 
quoted at §2.52£ in less than carlots and 
12c less for carlots of 15 tons. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— The business 
doing keeps up fairly well. We quoit 
the. base price as follows : §2.60 per 
100 tb. Oiling, 10c; coppering, 60c;and tin- 
ning, §2 per 100 tb. extra. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Mont- 
real, with freights equalized on those 
points. 

FINE STEEL WIRE.— This line contin- 
ues moderately active. The discount re- 
mains steady at 22 .V per cent. 

WIRE NAILS.— Trade in this line re- 
mains fairly good with prices steady. 
Our quotations are as follows : §2.55 for 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



less than carlots and $2.50 for carlots. 
The delivery points are Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, London, Gananoque, and Montreal. 

CUT NAILS.— The demand for these 
continues light. The base price is quoted 
at $2.45 per keg, and 3p2.37-£ for carlots. 

HORSE NAILS —There is a fair trade 
being dune in this line at unchanged 
prices, and the discounts are quoted 
as follows : " C brand, oval head, 

5U and 7^ per cent.; on' " H " brand, 5U, 
10 and 5 per cent.; " Monarch," 00 2-iJ 
per cent. Countersunk head, GO per cent. 

HOUSE SHOES. —In this line the de- 
mand still keeps lair. Quotations are : 
Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, $3.00 ; snow shoes, 
$3.85 ; light steel shoes, $3.70 ; leather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.05; iron shoes, No. 
1 and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; light 
steel shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4.95. 

SCREWS. — Trade in screws is being 
well sustained and there is some ctku- 
culty in obtaining supplies trom the fac- 
tories. The discounts are : hlat head 
bright, 87£ and 10 per cent.; round head 
bright. S2£ and ll» per cent.; llat bead 
brass, SU and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 65 per cent., and fiat head bronze, 
7U per cent. 

hilVETS AND BURRS.— Trade in this 
line still keeps up well, and the stocks 
on hand are not large. The price of 
copper rivets with burrs has been advan- 
ced. The discounts formerly were 45 and 
JU pei' cent., but this has been changed 
to 45 per cent, only, the extra 10 per 
cent, being withdrawn. The discounts 
are now as follows : Iron rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent.; iron burrs, 55 per cent.; cop- 
per rivets, with usual proportion of 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 
30 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS— The factories are 
making fair deliveries, and the stocks 
that were low are now being replenished. 
Our quotations follow : Carriage bolts, 
common ($1.00 list), 50 per cent. ; 
carriage bolts, full square ($2.40 list), 55 
per cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3 list), 55 per cent.; machine bolts, all 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws, 
cone points, 66 2-3 per cent.; elevator 
shaft and whillletree bolts, 50 per cent. 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS.— 
Trade is still active and a number of 
sorting-up orders continue to come in. 
No changes have occurred in the prices. 
Quotations are : Common doors, two 
or three panel, f.o.b. factory points 
as follows : Walnut, stained, 3-inch style, 
$6.80 per dozen ; stained, yellow, $7 ; 
natural color, oil finish, $8.15 ; 4-inch 
style, 20c. extra per dozen. Windows : 
No. 0, $1.60 ; No. 1, $1.70 ; No. 2, $1.95 ; 
No. 3, $2.10; No. 4, $2.50 per dozen. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH.— Quite a busi- 
ness is being done in this line at steady 
prices. We quote $1.37.V per 1 00 square 

feet, 

SPADES AND SHOVRLS.-These are 
still scarce and the demand for them is 
good. Prices are unchanged, and the dis 
eonnl is 10 and "> per cenl 

ROPE.— There is quite a trade doing 
in tin.', harvest sizes of rope. Following 
the decline in pure and British manila, 
sisal and lalhyarn have each gone down 
!,<■. We quote : Pure manila, 15c"; Brit- 
ish manila, 13c; sisal, 12.\e.; lathyarn. 
single, lie. double, 1 1 .', « • . ; sisal bed cord, 
,i 18 Fei i 65c . on feet. 80c.; 72 feet, 
95c. i»'i dozen. 



BINDER TWINE— Business in binder 
twine has not yet become active, though 
quite a few orders have been booked for 
future delivery. Quotations are: "Blue 
Ribbon," 650 feet, 15c; " Red Cap," 60o 
feet, 14c; " Tiger," 580 feet, 13c; sisal, 
500 feet, ll£c. 

HARVEST TOOLS— Business in har- 
vest tools continues fair, and a number 
of sorting-up orders are coming in. The 
demand for beet hoes continues large. 
The discount is 60 per cent. 

EAVETROUGH, ETC.— The trade in 
this line is still moderately large, and 
the prices are steady. Our quotations 
are as follows : Eavetrough, $3.10 per 
100 square feet, for 10-inch, and conduc- 
tor pipe at $4 for 3-ihch, and $5.25 for 
4-inch. 

BUILDING PAPER.— In this line the 
demand continues fair with no particular 
features to report. Our quotations are as 
follows : Dry sheathing, grey or straw, 
35c. per roll ; tar sheathing, grey or 
straw, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per 
roll ; tarred fibre, 60c. per roll. 

LAWN MOWERS.— The biggest part of 
the season's trade is over, but there is 
still quite a business being done in this 
line. We quote the discounts as 
follows : 50 per cent, on high - wheeled 
lawn mowers, " Star " mowers, 9-inch 
wheels, $2.25 to $3 ; " Daisy " mowers, 
17-inch wheels, $2.25 to $2.50. 

HARVEST WHIPS.— There has not yet 
been much call for harvest whips. 

POULTRY NETTING.— This line con- 
tinues unchanged with some demand from 
outside points. 

TINWARE AND ENAMELLED WARE. 
— In tinware, trade, which usually slack- 
ens off at this time of the year, contin- 
ues brisk. The trade in enamelled ware 
has shown no signs of slackening oft' as 
yet, although it usually does so during 
June and Julv. 

SPORTING GOODS.— In this line things 
continue as they were last week, the fea- 
tures being the number of guns, rifles 
and ammunition which are being sent to 
various parts of the country. 

CEMENT.— The market continues strong 
at the advance of last week, but trade 
has not been so active, a few of the 
smaller dealers holding off on account of 
the appreciation. The inquiry continues 
active and trade is expected to assume 
its normal activity in the course of a 
few days. Our quotations are : Canadian 
Portland, $2.25 to $2.85, and Canadian 
hydraulic, $1.35 to $1.60 per bbl. 

METALS. 

In metals, the buying movement this 
week has not been large though business 
cannot be said to be dull ; but it is feel- 
ing the effects of the holiday season. The 
prices remain steady, and the stocks are 
well assorted. The dullness of the out- 
side tin and copper markets is pronoun- 
ced. Tin is weak, as is also copper, on 
the New York market, but the London. 
Eng., copper market gained strength. 
The United States iron market is lifeless, 
but this has had no effect on prices. 
which remain strong, and the general 
outlook i; very bright. 

PIC IRON.— The demand for pig iron 
is very good, and a numoer of orders are 
ii, .w bring placed for delivery the first 
half of next year. The market in the 
United Slates is inactive but strong. We 
quote on track, Toronto, as follows : 
No. 1 foundry, $21, and No. 2, $20,50. 

STEEL BOILER PLATES— The out 
side markets continue strong. The local 
demand is steady and stocks are light. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

* ff AU ' sS ^rfPLargett Variety, 

nE/J ZZ^ S^/1 Toilet, Hand, Electric Fowerl 

V ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming &ud 
Sheep-Shearing Muchinef . 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8«ND POK OATALOSITC TO 
iurllu Sbmtw Ulf. Co., Hatkaa, H.H.,D8A 





The Best Door Closer is . . . 
NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRING 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of 
wind. Has many working advantages over the 
ordinary spring, and has twice the wear. In use 
throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. Gives 
perfect satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 

Hospital St., - - BIRMINGHAM. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 




A 

Verdict 

The Dun- 
das Axe is 

pronounced 
by all judges 
the best axe 
made. 



Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Haldimand, Jr., Montreal Agent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



F 
I 

E 

S 




WARRANTED 



Nicholson File Co., 

LARGEST FILE HAKERS IN THE WORLD 

Seven Factories — manufacturing all shapes, sizes 
and cuts. 

Nicholson's Increment Cut Files and Rasps repre- 
sent a combination of skilled labor and the best 
material necessary for the production of a good article. 

The result of many years' experience. 

Prices Consistent With Quality. 

For sale by all prominent Hardware and Mill 
Supply Merchants throughout the Dominion. 

Dominion Works, ■ PORT HOPE, CANADA. 



We quote : Steel boiler plates, §1.80 for 
carload lots on track, Toronto. 

STEEL BEAMS.— A fair business at 
unchanged prices continues. We quote : 
Steel beams, from stock, $2.75, and in 
carloads, on track, $2 per 100 lb. 

STEEL RAILS.— The Clergue Works are 
quoting steel rails for railways at $30 
per ton, and rails for electric roads, $35 
per ton. Orders for about 100,000 tons 
are said to he on the books of the com- 
pany. 

TOOL STEEL. — The market continues 
steady. We quote as follows : "B C" and 
" Black Diamond," 10 to lie; Jessop's, 
Morton's and Firth's, 14c; Jonas & Col- 
ver's, 8 to 15c; ditto, " Air Hardening,'' 
30 to 50c; Chas. Leonard's, 8 to 9c; 
Park's " Silver," 12 to 14c; Park's 
Special, 15 to 20c 

MILD STEEL.— The prices of this line 
an> steady. 

SPRING STEEL.— The activity in this 
line is a feature. 

BOILER TLBES.— There has been no 
change in these. 

BAR IRON.— The bar iron market is 
very stiff and the prices are nominal, 
with the demand exceeding the supply. 
One large concern which had contracted 
with a buyer on the market for 100 tons 
has been unable to fill the order. The 
scarcest sizes are those in general use. 
The United States market continues 
strong and without any new features. 
Our quotations aie as follows: §1.05 to 
§2.05 base. Extras cut to length while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c per 100 lb.; 
1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 
20c; over 20 ft. by special agreement, 
according to length and size. 

BLACK SHEETS. -The demand has 
improved during- the week and the prices 
are holding steady. We quote : Com- 
mon, S3. 15 for 28 gauge, and dead flat. 
$2.50 for 26 gauge. 

CANADA PLATES.— The condition of 
the market has not altered since last 
week. We quote : All dull, §3 ; hall' 
Relished, $3.10, and all bright, $3.75. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS.-These are 
still in good demand. We quote in case- 
lots, as follows : Queen's Head, $4.50 for 
2S gauge ; American, $4.40 for 29 gauge, 
Hell brand, $4.20 for 28 gauge. 

TIN. — There was a firmer feeling early 
in the week in the outside markets, and 
this had a tendency to improve the local 
demand. Locally, the quotatians are s:>,_! 
to $33 per 100 II,. 

T1NPLATES.— In this line the busi- 
ness has been brisk. We quote : Char- 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Speoial Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 



coal, $1.75 to $5 per box, and cokes, 
$4.25 per box. 

COPPER. — The demand for ingot cop- 
per lias eased off somewhat. The outside 
markets are steady and inactive. We 
quote : Ingot, $14 per 100 lb., and sheet 
copper, $22 to $23. 

BRASS. — The demand for brass con- 
tinues moderate, and the market is 
steady. The discounts remain unchanged 
at 15 per cent. 

PIG LEAD. — There has been more ac- 
tivity in this line this week. We quote 
pig lead, $3.50 to $3.75, and bar $5. 

IRON PIPE'.— The market is character- 
ized by no new features. Many shipments 
are being made to outside points, but the 
local trade continues inactive, and 
our quotations are now as follows per 
100 ft. : i-in., $2.40 ; f-in., $2.65 ; £-in., 
$2.85 ; f-in., $3.65 ; 1-in., $5.20 ; l£-in., 
$7.35 ; H-in., $8.95 ; 2-in., $12.55 ; gal- 
vanized, Tin., $7.20. Trade discount 4 
per cent. 

ZINC SPELTER.— This line is quiet 
and the prices are unchanged. We quote 
$5.50 to $6. 

ZINC SHEETS.-These continue in 
steady demand. We quote : Cask lots, -^(I 
i" $6.25, and part casks, $6.25 to §(>.5n. 

SOLDER. — The demand for solder is 
still active, and the prices are unchan- 
ged. 

ANTIMONY.— Trade in this line con- 
lim:es qriet. We quote $19.50 per ion 
lb. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Trade in paints and oils generally is 
lighter than it was, and few new features 
there are to report. There does not seem 
to be the scarcity of raw and boiled linseed 
oil there was a few weeks ago, the stocks 
now on hand being sufficient to supply 
current demands. The prices of this oil 
weakened early in the week, but later 
advices from London, Eng., caused them to 
stiffen up again. Turpentine in the South 
is lower, and this is causing the market 



here to weaken, so that, if present condi- 
tions continue, a slight decline is not im- 
possible. But that product is very uncer- 
tain, the prices, without warning, being at 
any time liable to advance or decline. 
There are a few orders coming in for ready- 
mixed paints. White leads ground in pure 
linseed oil are quiet. Paris green is inactive, 
but the prices thereof in the United States 
have advanced until now the base price is 
over 2oc. per lb. at the factories. Dry 
colors are slow, but a fair movement con- 
tinues in red leads for outside work. We 
quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, #5 %t% ; No. i, #5.50 ; No. 2, 
$5.i2j£; No. 3, $4-75; No - 4. $4 37'A in 
packages of 25 lb. and upwards ; j£c. per 
lb. extra will be charged for 12^ lb. pack- 
ages ; genuine dry white lead in casks, 

$5.I2#. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5 to $5.12^; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 
$5.50; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., #4; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., $4. 50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6^c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7^ to 8c. 

White Zinc— Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, #6 to $6 25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Shingle Stain — In 5-gal. lots, 60c. to 
$1.20 per gal. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, 17c. per gal.; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



$2. 25 to $2.35 ; white, §2.35 to #2.45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, 10c. extra. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2 .25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2 40 ; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., #2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2.90. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, #1.20 to 51.40 
per gal.; No. 1, $1.10 per gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, g}4 to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to io^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil- Raw, 1 to 2 barrels, 84c; 
boiled, 87c. ; 3 to 5 barrels, raw, 83c; 
boiled, 86c. ; 6 to 9 barrels, raw, 79c. ; boiled, 
84c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamilton and 
London, 2c. less. All quantities of 10 bbls. 
and over of linseed oil, sold only f.o.b. 
Toronto. Hamilton, London and Guelph. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 73c. ; 2 to 

4 barrels, 72c, delivered. Toronto, 

Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 

quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 

will be added, and for 5 gallon packages, 

50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 

charged. 

GLASS. 

The market here has been quite active. 
Local jobbers report quite a demand for 
cathedral glass. Stocks in some lines of 
window glass are becoming low, and this 
scarcity is becoming more acutely felt by 
reason of the slow arrivals of importations 
from Europe. Quotations follow : Under 
26 in., $4 45 ; 26 to 40 in., $4.65 ; 41 
to 50 in., $5 10 ; 51 to 60 in., $5.35 ; 
61 to 70 in., 55 .75 ; 71 to 80, #6.25 ; 81 to 
85, $7 ; 86 to 90, $7.75 ; Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London. Terms, 4 months, or 3 
per cent. 30 days. Discount off pane price 
list, 33^ per cent. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

There has been a faitly active business 
in brass and copper materials in this line. 
The prices continue steady, We quote as fol- 
lows : Heavy copper and wire, io%c. per 
lb.; light copper, 8c. per lb. ; heavy red brass, 
ioc; heavy yellow brass, 8 to 8>£c; light 
brass, 5c; lead, 2j^c; scrap zinc, 2% 
* to 2j£c. ; iron, No. 1 wrought, $14 per 
net ton ; No. 2 wrought, $6 ; machinery 
cast scrap, $14; stove plate, #10; malleable 
and steel, $6 ; old rubbers, 6c. per lb., and 
country mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — There are no new features in this 
market to report. Quotations areas follows: 
No. 1 green, 7>£c ; No. 2 green, 6j£c; 
No. 1 green, steers, 8j£c; No. 2 green, 
steers, 7#c ; cured, 8 to 8#c 



Skins — A change in the method of buy- 
ing calfskins has been inaugurated amongst 
the local dealers owing to the poor condition 
of some of the skins arriving. We quote : 
Veal skins, 6 to 14 lb. inclusive, No. 1, 
ioc; No. 2. 8c; do., 15 to 20 lb. inclusive, 
No. 1, 9c; No. 2, 7c; deacons (dairies), 
60 to 70c each ; sheepskins, 80c to $1 ; 
shearlings, 20c. 

Wool — The wool business continues very 
dull and the prices are very weak at 13c 
for fleece wool and 7c per lb. for unwashed. 

Tallow — The scarcity of this article is 

still a feature. Quotations are &% to 6^c 

per lb. 

COAL. 

There has been r.o change in the situa- 
tion at the mines, and no hard coal is yet 
coming forward. On account of its scarcity 
the summer demand for hard coal locally is 
light. Soft coal continues to be imported, 
the mines of that product not sharing in the 
dissatisfaction of the miners of hard coal. 
Quotations at international bridges are un- 
changed at #3 to $4 per ton for soft coal. 

PETROLEUM. 

Trade continues fair and the market is 
steady. We quote : Pratt's Astral, 17 
to itYzC in bulk (barrels extra); American 
water white, 17% to 18c in barrels ; 
Photogene, 17 to ijyic; Sarnia water 
white, i6j£ to 17c in barrels ; Sarnia prime 
white, 15 to I5>£c in barrels. 



market notes. 

An advance has taken place in some 
lines of axe handles. 

There has been a decline of y^c. per lb. 
in the prices of pure and British manila, 
sisal and lathyarn rope. 

There has been a change in the discount 
of copper rivets and burrs, the extra 10 per 
cent, being withdrawn. 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax, July 1, 1902. 

THE hardware business for the last 
week has not been a very active one, 
but still there is considerable business 
being done in small orders. This is the 
commencement of the slack season, which 
will continue as usual for a month or two 
before the fall trade opens up. The business 
for the six months of the year up to date has 
been extremely good, and many of the 
dealers have done a larger volume of busi- 
ness than in previous years. The financial 
conditions also have been favorable. Pay- 
ments have been made extremely well in 
all parts of the Province, and renewals and 
extensions have been less frequent than 
formerly. This gives a healthy tone to 
business, which would even compensate for 
a much smaller volume of business than 
usual. The indications are that these con- 



ditions will continue for the balance of the 
season. 

* * # 

As noted last week, there was a report of 
a reduction in cordage. This has taken 
place to the extent of %c. per lb. on manila, 
which is now quoted at i5J£c British 
manila has declined ic per lb. There has 
been no change in sisal, but as the price of 
this depends largely on manila, a decline is 
also expected. The reduction amounts to 
considerable, but it will be of little value 
just now to consumers, as the heaviest con- 
tracts for the season have long since been 
filled. The bulk of the manila supply 
comes from the Philippines, and on account 
of the war and the general devastation of 
the country, the price has been high for a 
year or two. With a more settled state of 
affairs in that country price conditions, de- 
pendent largely on the crops, will be much 
easier. 

* * * 

Building materials are still in considerable 
demand, both in the city and through the 
country. Prices in this line remain very 
firm. With the large reduction in glass 
stocks, prices have become mote settled, 
and the business is on a better basis. Lin- 
seed oil and turpentine still remain firm, 
and there is only a limited demand where 
new building or repairing contracts have 
opened up. Everything in the building 
line is very brisk in Halifax, and the retailers 
get a good share of the trade. As previ- 
ously noted, however, no retailer in Halifax 
could do business alone on shelf and general 
hardware, as nearly all the wholesalers do 
a retail trade. This compels the regular 
retailer to go into odd lines, such as sporting 
goods, kitchen utensils and other goods 
which naturally belong to some other line of 
business. This condition prevails more 
largely in Halifax, probably, than any place 

else. 

* * # 

The export business of Halifax was not 
so large last week as for the week previous. 
The amount was 5188,456, apportioned as 
follows : To Great Britain, £26,234 ; West 
Indies, $37,591 ; Newfoundland and St. 
Pierre, 517,092; United States, 57.539- 
The shipments of lumber to Great Britain 
amounted to 3,367,719 ft., valued at 
534.047. The exports to that country also 
included large quantities of canned lobsters, 
the season for which will shortly close, 
having been extended 10 days on account 
of the late prevailing bad weather. 

* * * 

Among the imports last week from New 
York may be mentioned 100 tons of mold- 
ing sand for Hillis & Son. Richmond, and 
300 bbls. brimstone, 2,000 bags nitre and 
100 bbls. pitch for The Acadia Powder Co. 

* # * 

The advertisement of one of the largest 
hardware firms in the city contains the fol- 
lowing : "All quotations for soil pipe and 
soil-pipe fittings are withdrawn." New 
quotations have not yet been given out. 

* * * 

Messrs. Crowell Bros., lately burned out, 
are rapidly getting their building renovated 
and fitted up in modern style. When com- 
pleted they will have much better accom- 
modations than formerly. In the meantime 
their business is conducted in an adjoining 
building. R. C. H. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



BUY TI1E 



BEST PAINTS 

AND SAVE YOUR MONEY. 

It is always cheaper to buy the best. It costs as much to 
apply a cheap as it does a good Paint. 



"BEAVER" BRAND 

and 

"T.L &C. CO." BRAND 



PURE 

PREPARED 

PAINTS 



HANUFACTURED BY 



THE TORONTO LEAD & COLOR CO., 



TORONTO 



Limited 



AR 



ST. 



For interior and exterior use. Most economical, because 
they cover the greatest surface. Cheapest, because they wear 
longest. Most satisfactory, because they look best. 

EVERY TIN GUARANTEED. 

As for our New Century Catalogue and Color Cards 




THE "NEW GEM SAFETY RAZOR. 

Shaves the STRONGEST as well as the MILDEST BEARDS- utterly impossible 
to cut the face. It is the Simplest and Surest (having device ever invented. The 
AUTOMATIC STROPPING MACHINE KEEPS THE BLADES IN KEEN 
CUTTING ORDER-a novice gels as good results as an expert. Sold by leading 
CUTLERY and JEWELERY dealers all over the civilised world, or mailed post- 
paid by the makers at the following prices : 

Razor, in Tin Box $2.00 

Razor, with Two Blades, in Handsome Morocco Case 3.50 
Automatic Stropping Machine, with Strop 2.00 

When making your purchase be SURE and take none wiihout the abovft "Trade 
Mark" and "Guarantee Ticket." It permits you to have ihe Hades REHONED 
or RESHARPENED FREE OP CHARGE Catalogue Mailed Free from the fol- 
lowiog distributing agents : Montreal -Caverhill, Learmont & Co. ; Quebec 
— Cbinic Hardware Co.; Berlin— -Ino. Feunell & Son; Hamilton— Wood, Val- 
lance & Co.; St. John, N.B.— Kerr & Robertson; Halifax, N.S.— A M Bell 
& Co.; Winnipeg, Man.— J H. Ashdown Hardware Co.; Vancouver, B.C. 
—McLennan, McFeely &Co.; Victoria, B.C.-M. & H. A. Fo-; or direct from 
the makers, The Gem Cutlery Co.: Works- 34 Reade St., N.Y.C. ; 9 Lon- 
don St., E.G., London; 9 Pickhuuen St., Hamburg, Germany. 

Dealer3 can be supplied at a large discount from the above firms. 




Winning Favor in Australia 

"The engineering merchants here consider your Solid Box Blacksmiths' 
Vises superior in quality and workmanship to any they have ever handled. 
They say they are remarkably suitable, and give perfect satisfaction." 

[Extract from letter received from our Australian Agents located in Melbourne.] 



Our facilities are unexcelled for making 



* Blacksmiths' and Machinists' Vises 



Modenv equipment and methods, high-grade material and workmanship 
are combined in our plant, producing 



THE BEST VISES MADE 



Lamplougti & McNaughtan 



l WUHAN SALES ACENTS 



19 De Bresoles St., Montreal 

Manufactured by 



THE COLUMBIAN HARDWARE COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

NEW CATALOGUE JUST ISSUED WRITE FOR IT. 




30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



JUDGMENT AGAINST A HEATING 
FIRM. 

JUDGMENT has just been handed out 
by Mr. Justice Curran, of the 
Superior Court, in the case of 
Larue vs. Mazier et al. The plaintiff, 
proprietor of the Hotel Cecil, St. Gab- 
riel street, Montreal, in January, 1900, 
awarded a contract to the defendants, 
who carried on business as plumbers and 
steamfitters. They undertook for a sum 
of $950 to do certain works, amongst 
others, to put in the heating apparatus. 
They agreed to examine and put into 
good working order the old furnace, then 
in the building ; they were to put in cer- 
tain steam pipes and radiators, giving 
the agreed quantity of heat. All their 
work was to be satisfactory to the archi- 
tect and proprietor. Fifteen per cent, of 
the contract price was to be retained by 
plaintiff, until the works were satisfac- 
torily completed. Defendants did all their 
work in the building satisfactorily, with 
the exception of the heating. 

Plaintiff's tenants held plaintiff respon- 
sible in damages due to insufficient heat- 
ing. When the defendants began their 
work they suggested to plaintiff that the 
old furnace, which was a No. 3. would 
perhaps be insufficient, and that it would 
In' preferable to put in a No. 6. Plaintiff 
acquiesced and agreed to pay $150 for 
No. 0. but defendants agreed to put up 
the old furnace in one of their stores in 
Nptre Dame street. When the apparatus 
was put in, the furnace No. (1 proved un- 
equal to heating the. building, and defen- 
dant suggested a No. 7. Plaintiff also 
agreed to this and to the payment of an 
extra 803 to cover the cost. Defendants. 
instead of putting in the No. 7, substi 
tuted a ()},. which gave less trouble in 
the fitting, but failed to give the neces- 
sary result. This substitution they con- 
cealed from plaintiff and his architect. 
Plaintiff protested defendants when the 
tenant protested him. Defendant at first 
seemed prepared to make the necessary 
changes, but finally dropped the matter 
altogether, and plaintiff had to get an- 
other contractor to put matters right. 
This cost $392, and plaintiff brings action 
for that amount. Defendants plead sub- 
stantially that thin' were not obliged i" 
heat the house, that this was a job of 
repairs, and that they had nothing to do 
luii follow the plans and specifications, 
which were insufficient. 

Mr. .Justice Curran's judgment was : 
Defendants' pretensions are unfounded, 
This was no mere job of repairs, it, was 
an undertaking to provide a heating ap- 



paratus for the house. Defendants, as 
skilled mechanics, were presumed to un- 
derstand their business and to know 
what size of furnace and what quantity 
of pipes and number of radiators were 
necessary. They should have pointed out 
to the proprietor the insufficiency of the 
provisions made and that the furnace 
would not furnish the necessary heat for 
the quantity of surface to be supplied. 
Plaintiff was anxious to help them out 
all he could, but he must not be made 
to suffer for his leniency and generosity. 
He supplied a new furnace at considerable 
cost to himself, was even willing to pay 
more for a No. 7. which defendants said 
was unnecessary, but which they failed 
to supply, endeavoring to tinker up a (H 
to meet the requirements. Plaintiff had 
to get another contractor, and after the 
notification given to defendants, he was 
justified in doing so and making defen- 
dants pay. But the charges must be 
reasonable. The court finds that the new- 
contractor has been exhorbitant in his 
charges for men and materials, and that 
he has gone beyond what was required 
in the heating surface supplied. The par- 
ties have submitted to the court a gen- 
eral statement of their respective ac- 
counts, involving other matters outside 
of the hotel heating, and agreeing that 
one judgment should cover all their diffi- 
culties and disputes. The court has 
arrived at the conclusion that defendants 
are indebted to plaintiff in the sum of 
S 1 77.77, for which judgment with costs of 
action of that class. 



pipe wrench, but also the exquisite com- 
binations of a regular nut wrench and 
pipe cutter. 



COMBINATION PIPE AND MONKEY 
WRENCH AND PIPE CUTTER. 

There is being placed on the market a 
new combination pipe and monkey wrench 
and pipe cutter. It is provided with a 
toggle jaw to make a sure grip and 
secure instant release. By withdrawing 
the pin and reversing the toggle jaw the 
tool is in shape for use as a pipe cutter, 
which reversal can be made in a few 
seconds. By throwing the toggle up at 
right angles with the wrench, the pipe 
can be lifted out of the V without run- 
ning the jaw back, which is referred to 
as a great saving of time. This feature 
is also applicable to the use on different 
sizes of pipe, whereby I or 2-in. pipe can 
be handled with little change in ihe posi- 
tion of the jaws. The tool is furnished 
in black or bright finish, with long or 
short nut, and in sizes that will take 
| ipe from } to 3 inches in diameter. The 
head and bar of (he wrench are alluded 
to as a one piece forging, made from thfi 
best material, and all parts are inter- 
changeable. 

It is claimed that the wrench not only 
combines the superior qualities of a gas 



" BRILLIANT" ALUMINUM GAS TIPS. 

Guest & Co., 86 Church street, have 
secured the sole Canadian agency for the 
" Brilliant " aluminum gas tips, manu- 
factured bv The Gas Tip and Self Lighter 
Co. A beautiful and bright gas light 
is produced from the aluminum gas - tip 
burner. It is claimed for them that they 
will last forever. They are warranted 
not to rust, corrode, clog or smoke. 
Gregory's governor burner with the 
aluminum tips, it is claimed, saves from 
10 to 50 per cent, on gas bills, and gives 
a perfect flame. Cotton batting is used 
under every tip to mix the gas before 
burning, and can be seen by looking in 
the under side of the burner. They are 
sold at 10c. each, or $1 per dozen. It is 
believed that they completelv obviate the 
difficulty experienced in cracking globes. 



BUILDING PERMITS IN OTTAWA 

IN Ottawa seventeen building permits 
were taken out during the week, as 
follows : F. H. Webb for a solid 
brick house on McLeod street, for SO, 500 ; 
George W. McDonald for a solid brick 
house on Kent street, for 82,000 ; Fred 
Schroeder for a frame house on Mutch- 
more street, for 8350 ; George Tomlinson 
for four veneered dwellings on Elgin 
street, for $5,000; John McKanney for 
three brick-veneered dwellings on Gibnore 
street, for $3,500 : Wm. Richards for a 
solid brick house on Albert street, for 
83,500 ; A. H. Awrey for two semi ,1 
t ached dwellings on Fourth avenue, for 
$3,000; H. G. Stanley for addition I., 
store on Elgin street, for 8250 ; Con 
sinners' Electric Co. for a solid brick (lis 
tributing station on Maria street, for 
812,000 ; Church of England School for 
a solid brick addition at the corner of 
McLaren and Kent streets, for $1,200 : 
Wilson Southam for a solid brick dwell- 
ing on Stewart street, for $7,000 : W. 
Beardsley for a solid brick addition to 
dwelling on Wilbrod street, for $175 . 
Joseph Gagnon for an iron ci., 
dwelling on McGee street. for SOI Id : 
Alfred Bernard for a frame dwelling on 
Poplar street, for 8100; Robert Ken, 
for a frame dwelling on Division street. 
for $700 ; Mrs. Violctta Kerr for a frame 
dwelling on Division street, for 8700. and 
Andrew Kerr, for three brick-venei 
dwellings on Maple street, for 85.100. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

Guest & Co.. Church street, Toronto, 
have secured the contract for the 

fitting of Bishop Sweetnam's house on 
the island. They also have a further 
contract for additional overhauling and 
heating of the house of Frank Smith. 
Bloor street. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



GLASS 



GLASS 




Send along your specification now, large or 
small, for Star Glass, Picture Glass, Double 
Diamond Glass, 26 and 32-oz. Glass, Ornamen- 
tal, Rolled, Cathedral, and all kinds of Fancy 
Glass. A specialty of Chance's beautiful "Vine" 
Pattern Glass. Large stocks just arriving. 



A. RAMSAY & SON EST'D 

MONTREAL 1842 



PAINT MAKERS 
GLASS IMPORTERS 



Copper Co., Limited 



Booth 

Cuts 

Copper and Brass 



SHEETS-TUBES-RODS 



to any size. 



FULL STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND. 
PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 



The BOOTH COPPER CO., Limited 



119=123 Queen St. East, 

TORONTO 



Extreiq^ Meet 



The Fairbanks 
Standard Scales 



%Sr^&$? 



This Scale has a 
capacity of ' , oz. 
to 2 lbs. 



to-day hold the place they have occupied in the 
Scale market for the past 50 years. 

You can't make a mistake in buying a "Standard," 
always accurate sensitive and durable. 



Prices gladly quoted. 



Write for a Catalogue. 



r 



THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 



747 and 749 Craig St., MONTREAL. 

ORMISTON BUILDING, VANCOUVER, B.C. 




This Scale Weighs 2,000 Bushels of Wheat. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUILDING PERMITS IN TORONTO. 

UP to the end of dune this year the 
building permits taken out in 
Toronto amount to $71(>,S7 ( .) more 
than those granted during the same 
period last. year. The permits issued u|> 
to June 30, L902, total $1,901, Ml, as 
against 81,154,265 for the same period 
last year. Included in the permits issued 
this year are' an addition to the new 
hotel on King street for $225,000, and the 
new Exhibition Buildings, amounting to 
8133.500. The building permits for June 
aggregated $400,476, an increase of $162,- 
100 over June, 1901. 

Building permits were granted during 
the week in Toronto as follows : G. \V. 
Howland for a 2^-storey brick dwelling 
on Roxborough avenue, for $3,200 ; 
Charles Wray for a two-storey and attic 
brick and stone dwelling on Dovercourt 
Road, for $-2,000 ; W. and F. Elliott for 
a pair of two-storey semi-detached brick 
and roughcast dwellings on Pendrith 
street, for $1,600 ; Jno. Smith for a two- 
storey brick dwelling at 183 Arthur 
street, for $1,800; Bank of Ontario for 
a three-storey and basement stone and 
brick addition on the south-east corner 
of Yonge and Carlton, for $4,000 ; Geo. 
Beardmore for a brick foundation glass 
greenhouse on Beverley street, corner of 
St. Patrick, for $600; A. B. Orel for a 
two-storey and attic brick dwelling on 
South Drive, for §4,000 ; R. G. Kennedy 
for a one-storey brick dwelling, Park- 
ham avenue, for $1,600 ; 0. H. Walker 
for rebuilding frame and lumber house, 
275 Dupont street, for $275 ; Henry Ward 
for a two-storey brick residence on Kip- 
pendavie avenue, near Queen street, for 
$2,000 ; H. Swackhamer for a one- 
storey roughcast dwelling on Hogarth 
avenue, for $300 ; S. F. Aberdeen for a 
two-storey and attic brick dwelling on 
Gladstone avenue, for $2,200 ; J. Wheeler 
for two pairs of two-storey semi-detached 
dwellings on Givens street, for $5, ODD ; 
T. N. Sampson for a three-storey brick 
store and dwelling on the corner of Dun- 
das and DulVciin streets, for $5,000 ; 
Joseph Reading for a 2^-storey brick 
residence on Rusholme Road, near Bloor 
street, for $2,500 ; David R. Carothers for 
a pair of two-storey brick and roughcast 
dwellings at 632-631 Gerrard street east, 
for 81,000 ; Jno. Morrison for a two- 
storey brick foundation and roughcast 
walls dwelling on Crawford street, for 
$700 ; L. E. Graham for a two-storey and 
attic brick dwelling on Delaware avenue, 
for $2,500 ; The Poison Iron Works for a 
two-storey blacksmith shop, covered with 
galvanized corrugated iron, on Esplanade 
street, for $3,200; W. G. Smith for a 
two-storey brick dwelling on Albany ave.. 
for $1,800; Jos. McCausland for a two- 
storey brick addition on Wood street, for 
§400; Trustees of the University of To- 
ronto for a three-storey medical school, 
brick and terra cotta, in Queen's Park, 
for $125,000. 



TO PREVENT GAS PIPES FREEZING. 

A simple Imt effect i\ e de\ ice for pre- 
venting the freezing of gas pipes is de- 
scribed in The Zeitung fur Blechindus- 
nie. consisting merely in the insertion of 

a wider piece of pipe just where the eon 

duil issues from the ground or wall. For 
a conduit of a diameter from i; to .\ of 
an inch a length of from 20 centimeters 
to 30 centimeters of a pipe I inch in 
diameter sufficos. The deposition of the 



water particles contained in the gas, 
which on leaving the works have a tem- 
perature af about 10 degrees C, natur- 
ally takes place just where the gas is 
subjected to the; most abrupt change of 
temperature, i.e., on its issue from the 
ground. If the external temperature is 
sufficiently low, the deposed water imme- 
diately congeals and clogs the conduit. 
As soon as the gas has acquired the 
temperature of the conduit the deposi- 
tion of water and congealing cease, and 
this is said to be the case a short dis- 
tance beyond the first cooling point. 
Therefore there should be no congealing 
beyond the inserted wider pipe, and this 
piece is wide enough to accommodate a 
thick ice-crust and to still leave a free 
passage for the gas. As a matter of fact, 
the principle of this new method is al- 
ready employed in street lamps, and with 
success. 



TORONTO PLUMBERS' STRIKE. 

Plumbers who arc on strike in Toronto 
are leaving that city daily. Most of 
them are going across the line. The mas- 
ter plumbers seem to have plenty of work 
on hand, but their disposition at present 
is to hold out. The plumbers must ac- 
cept the same or less wages than they 
formerly earned before the master plumb 
ers move. The plumbers claim they can 
earn $3 per clay and in some places $3.50 
where they will go across the line. 

The following official statement was 
handed out a few days ago : " The 
plumbers say that in their dispute with 
their employers they have been unfairly 
criticized. The employers' only ground 
for refusing their request has been that 
they were breaking the agreement made 
between the parties, and had given no 
notice of such intention. As a matter of 
fact, they were given three full months' 
notice, and positively refused to make 
the slightest concession. As to break- 
ing the agreement, even legal minds 
differ, and is it wonderful that we should 
hold the opinion that in giving three 
months' notice, we have kept strictly 
within the agreement in the courses we 
have taken ? Even were it not so, there 
have been so many violations of the 
agreement by various members of the 
Master Plumbers' Association, that our 
members feel they were quite justified in 
taking the course they have pursued." 

THE VIEW OF THE MASTERS. 

In view of the official statement of the 
plumbers that the agreement entered in- 
to by the journeymen and the. Master 
Plumbers, Steam and Gasfitters' Associa 
tion, of the city of Toronto, on March 
19, 1901, permitted of a lapse of the 
agreement after a three months' notice 
for its termination by either side, it will 
be interesting to quote clause 11 of that 
agreement : 

Clause II— That the time for the en 
forcement of this agreement takes effeel 
from the 1st day of April, 1901. and to 
stay in force until the 1st day of Janu 
arv. 1901. And should either party to 
this agreement wish to change, add, or 
amend the above, they shall give at 
least three months' notice in writing 
prior to the termination of this agree 
llll'llt . 

To the journeymen plumbers the last 

sentence means : " But should either 

party to this agreement wish to change, 
add. or amend the above, (hey shall give 
at least three months' notice in writing 



prior to such time as the termination ol 
this agreement shall take effect." 

That this is not the intention, the mas 
ter plumbers; it is believed, rightly con 
tend. The master plumbers claim that 
the journeymen themselves did not so in 
terpret it at the time when the agreement 
was made, and when other strikes wen 
on evinced their satisfaction that it was 
not necessary for them to strike. The 
master plumbers will adhere rigidly to 
their determination to stick by the agree 
ment, and any advance must come from 
the men. 

A master plumber was asked by "Hard 
ware and Metal " what were the changed 
conditions which the men claim justify 
the course which they have adopted. He 
replied that the only change in condi- 
tions was the scarcity of men to be 
attributed to the steady employment 
caused by good times. 

Meanwhile the plumbers can carry out 
the work they have on hand. The plumb- 
ing business is, without doubt, dull, as 
the master plumbers will not book heavy 
contracts. 

INCREASE IN THE DIRECTORATE. 

Under the provisions of the Companies' 
Act, The Dominion Radiator Company, 
Limited, has given public notice that it 
has sanctioned a by-law for the purpose 
of increasing- the number of directors of 
the company from five to seven. 

A CONTRACT FOR FIXTURES. 

R. H. Lear & Co., 21 Richmond street 
west, Toronto, have secured the contract 
for fixtures for lighting the Sydenham 
street Methodist Church, Kingston, On!.: 
also the Anglican church, St. John the 
Evangelist, at Thorold, and the Bond 
street Congregational church, Toronto. 

CORNWALL WATERWORKS SYSTEM. 

The ratepayers of Cornwall, Ont., have 
recently voted on and carried by-laws to 
abolish the existing board of water com- 
missioners and have the waterworks 
managed by the town council, and to 
raise $11,000 to put in a new hydraulic 
plant instead of the steam plant now 
used at the waterworks pump house, and 
to provide for the raising of 810.00(1 to 
cover existing overdrafts and the cost 
of the proposed extensions to the water* 
works. 

CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a woru 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



WANTED 



MANUFACTURER'S AGENT WANTED TO 
carry samples for the manufacturer of a knife- 
cleaning machine, new in Canada, but requiring little 
introduction. Box 94, Hardware and Metal, Toromo. 
(35-3)^ 

CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY, 

Montreal. 

JONAS & C0LVER CO. 

Sheffield, England Lim,t6d 
STEEL WIRE DRILL RODS, 
PIANO WIRE, ETC. 

WILLIAM ABBOTT, Agent. 

13 St. John Street, -— — — MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



McArthur. Corneille & Co. 



MONTREAL 

Manufacturers and Importers of . . . 




White Lead, 

Oils and Colors, 

Prepared Paints, 
Window Glass, 

Varnishes, etc. 



OlLJO and 



Gelatine 



In extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 

For the GENUINE I And CELEBRATED 

Imperial French Green ENGLISH VARNISHES 



of JOHN LTJCAS & CO., 
PHILADELPHIA. 



of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 

LONDON. 



Please mention HARDWARE AND METAL when writing. 




Star Safety 
Razor. 

. The original and best Safety. 
Shaves Clean Saves Titie Never Pulls 



4 Marvel of Simplicity and Durability 



Beware of Imitations. 

The Three S'.ar Safety is the only Safety 
Razor that can be adjusted to a hair's widih 
by anybody to suit any face or beard by means 
of adjusting screws, fully protected from in-, 
fringers by the U.S. Circuit Court. 




Establish- 
ed 1875. 



For sale by all leading dealers throughout Canada. 
Bock bottom prices upon application to 

KAMPFE BROS,, 

1NVENTOJS AMD MANUFACTURERS, 



8 Reade Street 



NEW YORK CITY 



TWO GOOD LINES FOR THE 




WEATHER 



OIL STOVES. 



ICE CREAM FREEZERS. 



"LIGHTNING" 

Crank — i, 2, 3, 4, 6, 

8, 10, 12, 14 qt. 
Fly Wheel — 14 and 20 

qt. 



Iron Bottom 
'Summer Girl" 

1, 2 and 3 burner. 

Glass Bottom 
"German" 

1, 2 and 3 burner. 
^Tin Bottom, " Eagle," 2 and 3 burner. 

"Blue Flame Wickless," "Standard"— All Sizes 

WE HAVE ON HAND A GOOD STOCK OF THE ABOVE LINES AT RIGHT PRICES. 

THETHOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited 

MONTREAL. 





34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, June 30, 1902. 

BUSINESS is active in every line and 
collections are reported better by the 
trade. The only change in price for 
the week has been the decline of }£c. 
per lb. on manila twine of all grades. 

Paints, oils and glass are all in fair de- 
mand. There is no advance in glass, but 
there may be within the next week owing to 
the advance on the American market. 

Binder twine shipments are going forward 
witrr fair regularity, but will not be active 
until the middle of July. 

Extensive preparations are being made 

for exhibiting implements and machinery in 

motion at the Industrial Exhibition in July. 

The price list for the week is as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 30 

Plain twist 

Staples 

Oiled annealed wire 10 

" 11 



Galvanized wire, 6 to 8 gauge 
" II 



13 
14 

IS 
16 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy.keg. 
" 16 and 20 

10 
8 
" b 

4 
. " 3 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch 

% inch 

5-16 inch 

Yt inch 

7-16 inch 

K to K inch 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy. ... 
20 to 40 
10 to 16 .... 



13 
14 
IS 



3 35 
3 35 
3 45 
3 5o 
3 65 
3 9° 
10% 

5K 
SK 
5 

4& 

3 10 

15 

20 

25 
3° 
60 

75 



4 3° 
4 05 
4 55 
4 °3 
4 4° 
4 35 



8 50 

13 °° 

3 5° 



Horsenails,45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, S5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 

Spring steel 

Machinery steel ■■ 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 

' Jessop- 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb 

20 to 26 gauge 

28 gauge 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . 

18 to 22 gauge 

24 gauge 

26 gauge 

28 gauge 

Genuine Russian, lb 

Imitation " " 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 

26gauge 

28gauge 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 

IX " ' 

IXX " 

Ingot tin 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 

Broken lots 

Pig lead, 100 lb 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-i6andlarger S13 5° 

H •' 1400 

" y t and 5-16 1420 



7 75 

8 00 
8 5° 

11 00 

13 00 

15 0O 

33 

3 25 

7 00 

7 5° 
6 00 



Manila, 7-16 and larger 17 00 

H 17 55 

" yi. and 5-16 1800 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Poultry netting, 24 in 1 35 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87^ 

Round" " 8254 

Flat ' ' brass 80 

Round" " 75 

Coach 57 K p.c. 

Bolts, carriage.... 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 4op.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

" No. 12 36 

Bluestone, cask lots $5 5° 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra r. . 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, OF., pistol 30 p.c. 

" military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

OF. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley 's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 18 00 

soft, 10 gauge 21 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2H p.c. 

" " plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 

Prime white American 

Water white Canadian 

Prime white Canadian 



25KC 
24c. 
22c. 
21c. 



BINDER TWINE. 

Sisal and Standard f.o.b. Winnipeg $ 12 

Manila, 550 feet 13 

Manila, 600 feet 13K 

Pure Manila 15 *A 

Five-ton lots Ysc. less per lb., and car- 
lots ^c. less. 

. SCRAP. 
No. 1 cast iron $13 to $14 per ton 



No. 2 

Wrought iron scrap. . . 

Copper (heavy) 

Yellow brass (heavy) . 

Light brass 

Lead pipe, or tea lead. 
Zinc scrap 



5 to 



6 

5 

7c. per lb. 
7Kc " 
5c. to 6c. " 

20. tO 2.%C. " 
IC. " 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 75 

Less than barrel lots 80 

Linseed oil, raw 87 

Boiled 90 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor. 29 

Eldorado engine 2854 

Atlantic red 29K 

Renown engine 41 % 

Black oil 20 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 65 

Neatsfoot oil 90 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 2 00 

Pure castor oil, East India 11 

Lubricating 10 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 50 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 75 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 600 

5ito6o " " " 650 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 7 00 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2j£ 

kegs " 2& 

White lead, pure '..per cwt. 6 50 

No. 1 " 600 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade andcolor, per gal. $i.30to$i.go 



ENTERPRISING 





MEN 



know a good thing when they 
see it ! 

Here it is : 

The Canada Paint Company's 

MAGNETIC OIL 

for all kinds of Painting, inside and out- 
side. It is guaranteed to dry hard, will 
mix with all pigments ground in Oil, and 
is specially adapted for thinning Paint in 
paste form without using Linseed Oil, 
Turpentine or Dryers of any kind. It 
has been tested and is thoroughly safe, 
has great toughness, and may be de- 
pended upon for Durability. 

SOLE MAKERS 



THE 

CANADA 
PAINT 



COMPANY, 



Limited, 



v 



Note the name 

"MAGNETIC" 

and beware 
of substitutes. 



Ample stocks in 
Montreal and Toronto. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



THAI OLD RUSTED STOCK 

Why don't you get it together 
and have it made like new ? 

WE REPLATE, REPOLISH 

all kinds of Metal Goods in 
«"\ Gold, Silver, Copper, Brass 

and Nickel. 

Don't put it off any longer. Get 

the old stock fixed up for your trade. 

WRITE US FOR PRICES. 

MOORE & ORR, E1 pTa t t r e °rs 

81 Adelaide St. W., TORONTO. 



Banner Gold Blast 
Banner Junior Brass 
Climax Safety Tubular 
Little Bobs Brass 



SHELBY INCANDESCENT LAMPS, 
LAMP BURNERS, ETC. 




Manufactured by - 



The Ontario Lantern Co. 

HAMILTON 

Walter Grose, Selling Agent, Montreal. 




HARNESS PREPARATIONS. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 

HARNESS DRESSING 

Recognized as 
"THE STANDARD." 

Produces a brilliant jet- 
black gloss which will not 
peel or smut and to which 
dirt will not stick. 





Frank Miller's 

Harness Soap 

Unrivaled for 
cleaning and soft- 
ening Harness. 

Put up in cakes, 
pans, boxes and 
tubs. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil. 



Preserves and softens the leather, 
thus adding life. 

The highest quality of oil on the 
market. 



EARNEST 

Foil 



■• Manufactured B^J 
NBVYOBlfc 



"i See that your stock of l__J 

Wrapping Papers 

is of the kind that will stand hard 
usage — our kind — papers of these 
mills. 

Full weight. 

480 sheets to the ream always. 



CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



The Oshawa Wire Fence Co. 

OSHAWA, ONT. Limited 

Manufacturers of . . . ci --« 

Woven Wire Fencing, Gates. Etc. 
Also Dealers in Galvanized Fence Wire. 




Agents wanted Send for catalogue and prices. 



|^ ENTERPRISE""^ on an article is a 
Guaaa.ntee of QUALITY 



Bone, Shell & 
Corn Mill 



r 



No. 21, $2.50 



^0- ENTERPRISE "^1 

m . ,. . 

* ' CHOPPERS 




FOOD 



Four Knivcr 

with e&.ch Machine 



No. IOO, chops 2 lbs. per minute, 81.50 
No. 300, chops 3 lbs. per minute, 82.25 



Sell every D&.y in Ye&x 
GUARANTEED TO CHOP RAW MEAT 



Illustrated Catalogue FREE 



Ordei through your Jobber 



Cherry Stoners 

5 Sizes & Styles 




No. 1, $7.50 doz, 

Rapid Grinding & 
Pulverizing Mills ' 

45 -Size* & Styles for Handl 
it Poire,-, SI -'•'• to 300.00 ( 




No. 2% $4.75 



New York Branch. TR e Enterprise Mfg. (o. of Pa., Philadelphia, Pa. San 10 5 r F?on" o st B r r e*et ch ' 



10 Warren 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

THE creditors of R. B. Boddy, grocer 
and hardware dealer, Cookstown, 
Ont., have held a meeting. 

The estate of the late Standard Electric 
Co., Toronto, is to be wound up. 

Cummins & Co., general merchants, 
Ferguson, B.C., have assigned to T. C. 
Elliott. 

Simard & Trembly, general merchants, 
Copper Cliff, Ont., are offering to com- 
promise. 

Stiles & Dea, general merchants, Innis- 
fail, N.W.T., are dissolving ; N. W. Stiles 
continues. 

Denis Gauchier, general merchant and 
sawmiller, St. Felicien, Que., has assigned 
to V. E. Paradis. 

The Leth bridge Cooperative Association, 
Limited, Lethbridge, N.W.T., has assigned 
to Geo. H. Johnston. 

A consent of the assignment of Achille 
Gagnon & Co., tanners, electric light, etc., 
Victoriaville, Que., has been filed ; their 
creditors meet on July 12. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Fontaine & Lafrance, tinsmiths, Montreal, 
have dissolved. 

Moffatt & Miznier, lumber manufacturers, 
Bolton Glen, Que., have dissolved. 

D. G. Latta & Co., blacksmiths, Edmon- 
ton, N.W.T., have dissolved ; D. G. Latta 
continues. 

Webster Bros., coal and wood merchants, 
London, Ont., have dissolved ; R. J. Web- 
ster continues alone. 

J. A. Blakeman, agricultural implement 
agent, Virden, N.W.T., has admitted H. 
A. Scarth into partnership. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

V. Mitchell, blacksmith, Rosser, Man,, 
is advertising his business for sale. 

The business of H. Davis, blacksmith, 
Kennicott, Ont., is advertised for sale. 

A. R. Mills, general merchant, Mono 
Mills, Ont., is advertising his business for 
sale. 

J. D. Brown, general merchant, Dun- 
dalk, Ont., is advertising his business for 
sale. 

The assets of Thomas Ouellet, general 
merchant, St. Moise Station, Que., are to 
be sold. 

The stock of J. Ploude, general merchant, 
Riviere au Pierre, Que., has been sold at 
50c. on the dollar. 

Wm. Wyatt & Son, stove and tinware 
merchants, London, Ont., are advertising 
their business for sale. 

CHANGES. 

Wm. Groves, blacksmith, Beamsville, 
Ont., is removing to Glencoe. 



P. Danserau & Co., carriagemakers, etc., 
Montreal, have registered. 

Ellis Claude, blacksmith, Petitcodiac, 
N.B., is closing business. 

McLeod & Frere. plasterers, St. Cune- 
gonde, Que., have registered. 

Gauthier & Gauthier, sawmillers, Des- 
chambault, Que., have registered. 

The Continental Engineering and Con 
trading Co., Montreal, has registered. 

Lalond Regis, blacksmith, Cheneville, 
Que., has removed to L'Annonciation. 

Sheppard & Elliott, hardware merchants, 
Leduc, N.W.T., are succeeded by Clemens 
& Gaitz. 

E. L. Stewart, general merchant, Second 
Falls, N.B., is succeeded by Miss B. E. 
Stewart. 

Mrs. Delisle has registered proprietoress 
of Z. Delisle, blacksmith, St. Laurent 
D' Orleans, Que. 

Mrs. David Smith has registered for 
David Smith & Co., lumber merchants, St. 
Anne Du Sault, Que. 

Mrs. Emiie Lariviere has registered for 
Emile Lariviere & Co., lumber merchants, 
St. Anne Du Sault, Que. 

Edouard St. Amout has ceased doing 
business under the style of L. O. Demers & 
Cie, tinware merchants, St. Liboire, Que. 

Shaw & Dibblee, hardware merchants 
and grocers, Hartland. N.B., are succeeded 
by The Hartland Mercantile Co., Limited. 

FIRES. 

A. T. Button, sr., general merchant, 
Uxbridge, Ont., has sustained loss by fire ; 
insured. 

The mill of the Parrsboro' Lumber Co., 
Notre Dame, N.S., was burned ; the loss is 
$4,000, and there was no insurance. 



LAKE SUPERIOR COPPER OUTPUT. 

The Boston News Bureau gives the fol- 
lowing figures of the copper production in 
the Lake Superior district in lb., for the 
calendar year 1901, together with compari- 
sons with 1900 and 1899 : 

1901 1900 1894 

Calumet 74,510,557 "7,761,382 89,610^96S 

Tamarack 18,000 852 19,182,502 18,565,602 

Qulncy ' 20,540,720 14,116,651 14,301,i22 

Osceola 13,723,541 12,566,471 11,358,019 

Wolverine 5,360 000 '4,789,829 4,500,373 

Centennial 950.000 892,500 730,240 

Franklin ?,757,419 3,663,7.0 1,230,000 

Isle Royale 2,171,955 

Atlantic 4,666,889 4,930,149 4,675 832 

Baltic 2,641,432 1,735,060 621,336 

Bass 950,000 122,239 42,800 

Phoenix 93 613 88,206 

Adveoture 20,361 23,572 

Arcadian 800,000 1,350,000 500,000 

Arnold 856,000 763,911 

Miscellaneous 150,000 73,400 50,000 

Total 148,286,309 142,151,571 146,950,338 

The same paper gives the world's pro- 
duction of copper for a series of years as 
follows : 

Amer. Prod'ct'n, C'ns'mpt'n. Exports. Imports. 

1901.. .594,171,200 448,000,000 213,619,810 170,659,977 

1900. 60),832,F05 347,57^,484 362,731,143 103,805.793 
1899.. ..581,319,091 391,602,111 249,923,911 94,568^50 

1898.. ..635,900,232 274,135,139 239,765,054 43,479,288 

1897.. ..501,370,295 274,400,166 28S,626,240 26,938,254 
European— Production. Consumption. 

1901 224,539,840 601,600,000 

1900 205,121,280 717,814,720 

1699 210,844,480 624,715,840 

1898 198,517,760 674 269,12) 

1897 201,409,600 678,227,040 

FOUNDRYMEN SETTLE. 

The threatened strike among the iron- 
founders of Montreal was averted on Friday, 
June 27, by the men accepting a compro- 
mise on the wages they asked for. The de- 
mand was for $2.50 per day, and they 
agreed to take $2 40. 

Both the Ironmoulders' Union and the 
Foundrymen' s Association were represented 
at the conference by officials from Canada 
and the United States ; and some difficulty 
was reported at the meeting of the moulders 
to get a majority of the members to agree 
to the compromise. As it was, the motion 
passed with a majority of two. 



APOLLO BEST BLOOM 
GALVANIZED IRON 

Whatever advantage be- 
longs to galvanized iron and 
liberal dealing goes with 
Apollo. 

Costs not a cent, and re- 
lieves you of much anxiety. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

68 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



37 




Bell Telephone, 


. 


Main 208 


flerchants' 


P. 0. B,ox 839. 


3" 



ALEX. McARTHOR & CO. 



-MANUFACTURERS- 

2 & 3-Ply Ready Roofing, ■ Hanging and 
Building Papers, 
Sheathing and Carpet Felt, 
Coal Tar Products. 

Paper Hills : Joliette, Que. 

Felt Factory: Harbour and Logan Sts.. Montreal.- 
82 McGill Street, Montreal. 
QUALITY— THE BEST— no better manufactured. 



Print Paper, 

Brown and Manilla 
Wrapping. 



CUSHBflT JVLRRKET QUOTATIONS 



July 4, 1902. 
Thess prices are for such qualities and 
quantities »< are usually order d by retail 
dealers oa the usual terras of credit, the 
lowe.'t figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
qu -ntly make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor ia anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent error* in this lis>\ as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accuiate. 

MFT*LS. 
TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits — 

56 and 28 lb. ingotf, 100 lb. $32 00 $33 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates- Bright. 
MLS, equal to Bradley. Per box 

I.C., usual sizes $6 75 

I.X. " 8 25 

I.X.X. " 9 75 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

tO 675 

IX 8 25 

I.X.X 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Qrades — 

I."., usual sizes 5 00 

I.X. " 6 00 

I.X.X. " 7 00 

I.X.X.X. " 8 00 

D.C., 12%xl7 4 50 

D.X 5 25 

D.X.X 6 00 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 12x20 4 25 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 75 

20 x 28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates - Terne. 
Dean or J.G. Grade - 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

IX, Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X.X., 14x56, 50 sheet bxs.~> 

" 14x60, " V .... 06% 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 2» gauge 8 00 

" " 26 " 8 50 

IRON AND sTEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb. ... 1 95 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoon steel, 1% to3 in. base 2 90 

Sleigh shoe steel, " 9)0 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 285 300 

T.Firth • Co.'s tool eteel.per lb 12 1 /. <3 

Je>sop's tool steel " 1 1 

M rt n's tool steel 12% 13 

Black Diamond and "B.C." 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's tool steel. . . . 0? 09 

Park's "silver " tool steel 12 14 

" "special" 15 50 

,»^:as & Colver's tool steel. 08 15 

"air hardening' f 50 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

BOILER TUBES. Per foot. 

1%, \% and4inch 10 

2'/ 2 in 17% 

3in 14 " 

ST BEL BOILER PLATR. 

%in 2 50 2 60 

3-16 in 2 r0 2 70 

% in. and thicker 2 50 2 60 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Com. D.F1. 

llgauge 2 85 3 00 

20 " 2 85 3 00 

22lo24 gauge 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 " 3 15 

COPPER WARE, 
Discount, 50 per cenc. 



CANADA PLATES. « 

All dul', 52 sheets 3 00 

Half-poliehed 3 10 

All bright 3 75 

IRON PIPE. 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

% Inch 2 90 

% " 2 40 

% " 265 

V. " 2 85 

% " 3 65 

1 • " 5 20 

1'4 " 1 '5 

1% ■" 8 95 

2 " 12 55 

2% " 24 00 

3 " 28 00 

3% " 36 00 

4 " 43 00 

4% " 50 00 

5 " 57 00 

6 " 73 00 

Galvanized lipe— 

V4, inch 3 20 

% " 345 

% " 3 85 

% " 5 00 

1 " 7 20 

1% " 10 05 

1% " 12 20 

2 " 16 85 

Discount 4 per cent. 
Malleable Fittings — Discount 40 p.c. 
Cast Iron Fittings — 

On all cast iron fitting, inc uding plu£s, 
bushi gs, unions and nipples, 6 p.c. dis. 
All others— discount F0 p.c. 

GALVANIZED oHEETS. 

Queen's 
G.C. Court, imer. Head. 

15 gauge 

18 to 24 gauge... 4 05 3 75 .... 4 05 
26 " .. 4 25 4 00 .... 4 25 

28 " . . 4 50 4 25 *4 40 4 50 

Less than case lots 10 to ,5c. extra. 
*29 gauge. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, 3-16 in, per 100 lb 

% " ... 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " ... 5 25 5 50 

% " ... 4 50 4 75 

7-16 " ... 4 25 4 50 

% " ... 4 20 4 50 

9-16 " ... 4 05 4 50 

% "... 4 00 4 50 

% "... 4 00 4 50 

Halter, kennel and post chains. 40 to 40 and 
5r.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER 
Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

English B.S., ton lots 14 00 

Lake Superior 

Bar'. 
Cut length',round,% to % in 23 00 15 00 
" round and ■ quare, 

1 o 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

07., Ux48 and 14x60 22 00 22 50 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 o'., 

irregular sizes 22 50 23 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft. , 25 to 30 lb.eacb.per lb 23 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 22 

" 50-lb. and above I" .... 21 

Boiler and T. K. Pitts. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 



BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to : gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheet*, hard-r jlled, 2x4 0,3 1 

Tubing, base, per lb 23% 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per lb 5 50 6 00 

Domestic " 

ZINC SHEET, 

5-cwt. casks 6 00 fi 25 

Parte sks 6 25 6 50 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 50 3 75 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 2 1 /, lb. sq. ft., by roU 06% 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

NoTtf.— Cut sheets %c. per lb. extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights . er yarr 1 , lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 37% P-o. dis. f.o.b. Toro to. 

N T«.— Cut lengths, netpiice, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHOT. 
Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.: chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7 50. Dis- 
count, 22% p.c. Prices are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St John and Halifax. 
Teims3p.c. cash, heights equalized. 
SOIL PIPE AND FITTING*. 
Discount, 60 p.c. on medium and extra 
heavy, and 55 p.". on light soil pipe and 
fittings. 

SOLDER. Per lb. Per lb. 
Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 20 

Bar, half and-half, commer'l 19% 

Refined 19 

Wiping 18% 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's.perlb 9 ?0 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 5 87% 

No. 1 5 50 

No. 2 5 12% 

No. 3 4 75 

No. 4 4 37)4 

Munio'a Select Flake White 6 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 12% 

Braodrani's B.B. Genuine 7 00 

No. 1 6 00 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $1 75 

Genuine, : 00 lb. kegs, p r cwt 5 00 

No. ', ?60 lb. casks, per cwt, 4 55 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 50 

WHITE ZINC. 

E.tra Red Seal 06 08 

No. 1 05% 007 

No. 2 05 06 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

iSo. 1, casks 5 00 

No. 1, kegs 5 25 

PREPARED PAINTS. 
In %, % and 1-gall n ti . s. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualitie s, per gallon 1 

Barn(inblls.) 0(0 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 1 40 

Canada Paint Cos lure 1 2i 

Toronto Lead 4 C lor Co s put e 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy s pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion pure l 10 

COLORS IN OIL. 

25 lb. tins, standard Quali y. 

Venetian red, ptrlb 04% 06 

Chrome yellow '2 14 

Goldenochie 08 10 

French " 06 

Marine black 09 

Chrome green 

French imperial green 12 

Sigowriters' black 16 

Burnt umber 11 

" sienna 11 

Raw umber 11 

" sienna 11 



COLORS, DRY. 

[(Common ' chre, bbls 1 20 1 30 

lYelW ochre (J.F.L.8.), bbl' 2 00 

, Yellow ochr (La Belle) 115 125 

' Brussels ochre 2 00 

Venetian red (b st), bbl 1 75 2 00 

English oxide", per cwt 3 00 3 55 

American cxides, bis 125 2 00 

Canadian oxides, bl Is I 25 1 75 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 55 

Burnt sienna, pure, per lb 

" umber, " " 1 10 

Raw do 09 

Drop bl ick, pure 09 

Chrome yellow , pure 18 

Chrome gr, en", pure per lb.. . 09 10 

Golden ochre 04 05 

Ultr marine blue, in :8-lb. 

boxes, per lb 06 18 

Fire proof miieral, per 100 1 • 1 00 

Genuine Eng. Lithaive.p rib 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb 1 55 1 50 

Pure Indian red. No. 45, lb. . . 08 10 

Whiting, bbl 55 f.O 

English vermi lion in 30-lb. bags. 95 
PARIS GREEN. Per lb. 

Petroleum, casks lf% •■ 18 

Arsenic kegs 17 19 

50 lb. and 100-:b. drums 18% 19% 

55-lb. drums 19 2„ " 

1-lb. packages 20 20% 

%-lb. ilo 22 J2y, 

1-lb. tins, 

% lb. do 

FOB. Toro'to. Terms-3 p.c. off 30 days, 
or 4 mos. from date of delivery. 
BLUESTONE. 

Cisks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb. lots, do per lb 08 

PUTTY. 

Bulk in b Is 1 90 

Bulk in 1< ss quan' ity . 2 05 

Bladders in bbls 2 25 

Bladder* in kegs, boxes or loose 2 40 

Bladder s in 25-1 b. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12% lb. lins 2 65 

Bladd rs in bu'k or tins less than 1001b 2 90 
VARNISHE4. 
In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbiDg 2 85 3 20 

Oold size, japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 150 

Furniture, extra 125 

No. 1 1 10 

Hard oil finish 1 65 1 75 

Light oil finish 140 160 

Damar 1 70 1 85 

Shellac, white 2 35 2 45 

" orange . . 2 25 v 35 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 25 1 30 

" black jaian 85 1 20 

" No. 1.. 50 75 

El stilite varnish, 1 gal. can, eac\ 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels: Size 1, $1.20: 
si e 2, 70c: siJe3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Wiiliams' copal varnih, assorted 
cise, from %-pts. to 1 gal. $ '.50. 

CASTOR OIL. 

East India, in cases, peril). .. 00% 10 

small lots 10 10', 

COD OIL, EIC. 

Cod oil, per gal 50 55 

Pureolive 120 

" Leatsfoot 90 

GLUE 

Common 08% 09 

Frenchmedal 14 01% 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

white, extra 18 20 

Gelati e 2 30 

Strip 18 50 

Coopers 19 20 

QUttntr 18 



38 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Oloth 
Corn 
F"loijr 



EMERY 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, Montreal. 



HARD WARS. 

Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 

B. B Caps Dom. 50 and 5 per oent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis 40 p. o., Amer 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 5 ( and 5 p. o 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle 10 p. o. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, disoount 40 
per oent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per oent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.o. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. ; American, $ 1.60. 
Wads per lb 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb.bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 36 

Beat thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7and8gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Huperior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges .' 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10% 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over .... 09% 

Brook's, .... Oil 1 /! 

Angers . 

Gilmour's discount 65 and 5 p.o. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 1100 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.o. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tabs. 

Zino 6 00 

Copper, disoount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

514-Inch rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

" " " 2nd " 20 00 

Anti-Friction Metal , 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

" 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friotion Metal, per lb 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 41 

Dynamo 27 

Special 22 

Aluminum, 99 p.o. pure "Syracuse".. 45 

Bells. 

Hand 
Brass, 60 per oent. 
Niokel, 55 per oent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per oent 
Farm. 

American , each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra , 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 50 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockf ord, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jenuings' Gen. net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per gross.... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolls and Nuts . Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list)... 55 
" " full square ($2.40 list) 55 

" " Norway iron (.$3 list).. 50 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 50 and 5 

Plough Bolts 50 and 5 

Blank Bolts 50 and 5 

Bolt Ends 50and5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65 and 5 

Coach Screws, cone point 66% 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3%c per lb off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes. 3%c. per lb. off. 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c . 

Nuts, io 50 lb. lots %c. per lb. extra, in less 
than 50 lb. lots, %c extra. 

Boot Calks. 
Small and medium, ball, per M.... 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 62% per cent 

Broilers . 

Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% Per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent 

Henis, No. 8. " 6 00 

Henis,No.9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Butcher Knives. 

Bailey's, per doz 60 6 30 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 lb 1 70 

Rtady roofing, 2-p]y, not under 45 lb. 

per rol 85 

Realy roofing, 3-plv, not under 65 lb. 

perroll 1 10 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 00 

Dry sheathing, per roll, 400 sq f t 35 

Tar sheathing, " " " 45 

Dry fibre " " " 5d 

Tarred fibre, " " " 60 

O.K. 4I.X.L., " " " 65 

Resin-siz.ed, " '* " 40 

Oiled sheathiog, " 600 " 110 

•' 400 " 70 

R-of coating, in barrels, per gal 17 

' " sm all packages 25 

Refined tar, per barrel 4 50 

Coal tar, " 4 00 

Coal tar, less than barrels, per gal... 15 

Roofing pit. h, per luO lb 85 

Bnll Rings. 

Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 



Butts. 

Wrought Brass net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz .... 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 8 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 190 2 75 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 50 ^75 

Canadian hydraulic 1 25 1 50 

Arrow 2 25 

Buffalo 2 00 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump , per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels . 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 

Revolving Churns, metal frames — No. 0, $8— 

No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 

No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 

wood frames — 20c. each less than above. 

Discounts : Delivered from factories, 56 

p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 54 p.c. 

Terms, 4 months or 3 p. c. cash in 30 days 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. $9 6 J 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Teu. Syphon Washout 6 00 
Emb. Elgin orTeu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic plain 9 60 
-" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Ont. Sy. Jet, plain 11 70 

" " " " " emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

BasinsP.O., 14in 70 

" oval 17 x 14 in 150 

" " 19x 15 in 2 25 

Compasses, Divider s ,Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Conductor Pipe. 
Plain or Corrugated. 

2-ioch, per 100 feet 3 00 

3 4 00 

4 5 25 

5 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 

Cradle s, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per oent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

" 6, " 15 

Boynto pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per oent. 



EAVE TROUGH. 

10-inch, per 100 ft S3 10 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) per doz. 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 20 

7-inch 1 35 

Polished, 15o. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 " 

Kearney * Foot 70 " 10 " 

Difston's 70 " 10 " 

American 70 " lu " 

J. Barton Smith 7» " 10 " 

McClellan 70 " 10 " 

Eagle 70 " 10 " 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 " 

Royal 80 " 

Globe 70 to 75 " 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 p.c. 

Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cen*. 
Nicholson File Co 's "Simplicity" file handle 
per gross 85c. to 1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under 26 2 20 4 25 .... 6 25 

26to40 2 40 4 65 .... 6 75 

41 to 50 5 10 .... 7 50 

51 to 60 5 35 .... 8 50 

61to70 5 75 .... 9 75 

71 to80 6 25 .... 11 00 

81 to 85 7 00 .... 12 55 

86to90 7 75 .. 15 to 

91 to 95 17 50 

96 to 100 . ... 20 60 

GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's Nos. 26 to 33, each... 165 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

,r % " 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web,— per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian perlb ... 07% 08)4 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb.... 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 3 09 

Store door, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Fork. 
C. & B. , dis. 40 per cent, rev list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. ist. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 100 125 

Plane. -, 

merican, per gross 3 15 8 75 

Hammer and Hatchet, 
anadian, 40 per cent . 

Oross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs . 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 ineh 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's oovered— 

No. 11, 5-ft.run 8 40 

No.U%,10-ft.run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS 
Canadian, die 40 to 42% per oent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



39 



Wire-Edged Ready Roofing 

The above Roofing is fast becoming the popular substitute for Shingles, because it is Durable, 
"Economical and Fire-proof. We wish to supply customers through the Retail Hardware 
Merchants, and, with that object in view, we are spending thousands of dollars in advertising our goods. 
It will be your fault, not ours, if we are forced to sell direct to the user. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montreal. 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. SO and 10 to GO per cent. 

HeavyTand strap,4-in. , per lb 06% 

" " 5-in., " .... 06'/ 4 

" " 6-in., " .... 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc, dis. 60 p.o. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount, 45 and 5 per oent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 100 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can. dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 
HORSE NAILS. 
"C'brand 50 and 7%p.c.off new li.tl Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J head 
Countersunk, 60 percent. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium and heavy... 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 pc. off list, June 1899. 
ICE PICKS. 

Starperdoz 3 0) 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.o. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb ) 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N. P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz — 6 00 9 00 
Shutter, porcelain, F. & L 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 95 1 0J 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

.Cold Blast, per doz 7 00 

'Tlo. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No.0 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 120 130 

LINES. 

Fish per grosB 105 2 50 

Chalk •* 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS 
Canadian, dis 40 p.c. 

Russel&Erwin per doz.... 3 00 3 25 
Cabinet, 
agle, dis. 30 p.c. 



Padlocks. 
English and Am. per doz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head discount 20 p.o. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, perdoz. 125 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Oaulkingeach 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz.... 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2dand 3d $3 45 $3 55 

3d 3 10 3 22 

4 and 5d 2 85 3 05 

6and7d 2 75 2 SO 

8and9d 2 60 2 70 

10andl2d 2 55 2 65 

16and20d 2 50 2 60 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 45 2 55 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.50 
Galvanizing 2o. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 75 p.c. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis . 25 per cent , 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and Amerioan 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19w.g., dis. 50and5to 50 and lOp.c. 
2-in. Mesh, 18 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.o. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

U.S. Navy 7 25 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oi 
can, with pump, 5 gal. 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis . 45 p.o. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs discount 45 percent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, die. 40 p.c. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, dis. 40 p.o. 
Creamer cans, dis. 40 p.c. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per gross... 1 75 3 00 
Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PINE TAR. 

% pint iu tins, per gross 7 80 

1 " " " ... 9 60 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian die. 40 per cejt. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian cr American 7% 
to 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, perdoz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Standard Compression work, dis. 60 p.o. 
"J.M.T." Cushion work. dis. 50 p.o. 
Fuller work, dis. 65 p.c. 
6 doz. lots and over of the above antra dis. 
10 pc. 



Lever Handle Stops and Waste, discount 

60 p.o. With, in lots of 2 doz. and over, 

an extra dis. of 10 p.c. 
"J.M.T." Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 55 p.c. 
Standard GloDe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 65 p.c. 
"J.M T." Radiator Valves, dis. 55 p c. 
Standard " " dis., to p.c. 

Patent Quick Opening Va!»es, dis. 70 p.c. 
No. 1 compression bath cock, net . . 2 00 

No. 4 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No. 4%, " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

oock, hot and cold, per doz 15 00 

Patent Comprepsion Cushion, bath 

cock No. 2208 2 25 

Square head trass cockB, 60 p.c. 

" " iron " 60 p.c. 
Compe' ition Globe, Angle and Check Valves 

discount; 70 p. c. 
Competition Quick Opening Radiator Valves, 

discount, 70 p.c. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 2i% per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 1 00 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors 's ' 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid.per set 00 72 

" hollow ptr inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS. Net. 

Dominion, 30 gal 5 75 

Dominion, 35 " 6 75 

40 " 7 75 

Ronald's Galvanized, 30 gallons 6 50 

35 " .... 7 50 
40 " .... 8 50 

CopDer, 30 gallons '0 00 

" 35 " 23 20 

40 " 26 40 

RAKES. 
Wood, per doz.net no 

RAZORS. 
„., per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 0C 

Geo. Butler 4 Uo.'s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 1)00 

King Cutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade 4 Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 on 12 00 

Bailey's 6 00 12 00 

Carbo Magnetic Razor 15 00 

Griffon Barbers' Favorite 10 75 

Griffon No. 65 13 

Griffon Sb ft ty Razor.' 1 50 

" Stropping Machines 13 50 

All other razors 50 p.c. off catalogue price. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AMD BURR?. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 per oent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron RivetB in 1-lb.cartonp, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets within ual proporl ion burrs, 45 

p. c. dip. cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, 30 and p.c. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivetr, 

%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SET?. 
Canadian, die. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPF, ETC. 

Sisal 12% 

Pure Manilla 15 

"British" Manilla 13 

Cottor, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

" % inch 22 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute s 

Lath Yarn 11 



Sisal bed cord, 48 ft per doz. 65 

60 f- " 80 

72 ft " 95 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 55 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p.c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 70 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B 4 A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 
Garrjet(Rurton's),5 to 10 p.c. advance on list 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.o. 
S. 4D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.. 35 55 
S. 4 D., dis. 35 p.o. on Nos. 2 and 3 

Hack, complete, eaoh 75 2 75 

" frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, " 1 75 2 00 

SASH CORD. 

Perlb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln and Whiting, per doz 4 75 

Hand Sets, No. 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-cut Sjts.No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

SCALES. 
Burrow, Stewart 4 Milne- 
Imperial Standard, 45 per cent. 
Weigh Beams, 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, 55 per cen 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
Dominion, 55 p.c. 
Richelieu, 55 p.c. 
Warren's new Standard 45 p c. 
Champion 55 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 
Sargent's per doz 65 100 

SCREWS. 

Wood,F.H.,brightandsteel,87%andl0r.'-. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and 10 p.o. 

" F. H., brass dis. 80 and 10 p.c. 
Wood.R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.o. 
F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.c. 
B.H. " 70 p.c. 

Drive Screws, 87% and 10 peroenl. 

Bencb, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

iron. " 4 25 5 00 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cen' . 
SCYTHES. 

Perdoz., not 5 00 8 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co. , full nickeled, dis. 60 and 

2% p.c 
Bailey Cutlery Japan handles, 67% p.c. 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dip. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plair, dis.. 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 25 3 5' 

Plain 2 90 3 15 

Coopers', discount 45 percent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 



40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



—TO IMPORT. 



Prompt Deliveries 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK 
BEST GLASS of aJ1 kinds, our own manufacture. Closest 



rices. 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Hill & Rutherford 



Warerooms and Offices— 135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.o. 

STONE. Per lb. 



Washita 28 

HindoBtan 06 

" slip 09 

Labrador 

' ' Axe 

Turkey 

Arkansas 00 

Water-of-Ayr 00 



60 
07 
09 
13 
15 

50 

1 50 
10 
5 00 

25 00 

28 00 

29 00 



Scythe, per gross 3 50 

Gtrind,2in,40 to 200 lb, per ton .... 
'* under 40 lb. " .... 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " 

STOVE PIPES. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4— 3 dozen in case.net cash #4 80 

No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 
TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued SO & 12V2 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... .85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 15 

" " tinned 80&20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cat tacks, blued, in dozens only ..80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 & 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12% & 12% 

" brush, blued k tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 & 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 5!% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned. 65 and lu 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 



5 00 
9 75 
2 85 
8 00 



Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 25 

Zino glazier's, points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

" " " bulk 40 

Shoe nails 60 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz.. . . 2 75 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 

Chesterman's each 90 

" steel, each .... 80 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 
Bailey's, dis. 25 p.c. 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Same, H. & N„ P. S. & W., 65 p.o. 
G ame , steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 

S. & D. , discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 

" 4-ply 

Mattress .per lb 33 

8taging, " 27 

VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brook's 12% 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 



00 



27 
19 
23 
45 
35 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

SMOOTH STBEL WIRE. 
No. 0-9 gauge $2 60 



10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



6c. extra. 
12c. " 
SOc. " 
30i " 
40c. " 
55c. " 
70c. " 
2 for tinning 



Add 60c. for coppering and 
Extras net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c 
spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c 
best steel wire 75c, bright S'-fc drawn 15c. > 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, paoked in 
casks or cases 15c, bagging and papering 
10c, 50 and 1001b. bundles 10c, in 25-lh. 
bundles 15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 
1-lb. hanks 50c, in %-lb. hanks 75c, in %-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 22% per cent 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, S5-No. 18, 85.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65-No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26 
89.50-No. 27, $10-No. 28,811 No. 29. 
812-No. 30, 813-No.31,814-No. 32 815. 
.No. 33, 816— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
84— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil, 
ing, 10c. — in 25-lb. bundles, 15c. —in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c. — bagging or 
papering, 10c 



Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off tie 
list. 

Copper wire, 45 and lOperoent. net cash 30 
days, f.o.b. factory. 

Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7,8, $3 50 
to 83.85— No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10, 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10- No. 
12, $3 to $3.30— No. 13, $3.10 to 83.40— 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50— No. 15, 84.60 to 
85.05— No. 16. 84.85 co 8535. Base sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52% f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18, *2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hol- 
low 6 strand, No. 17, $4.30; No. 18. $2.70, 
No. 19, $2.35; No 20,82.30, f.o.b. Hamil 
ton, Toronto Montreal 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

3alvanized, plain twist 3 00 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77% 
in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 
WIRE CLOTH 

Painted Soreen, per 100 sq.ft., net.. 1 37% 
Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASTE COTTON. per lb. 



Colored 

White 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe'e Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 

G. k K. 's Pipe, per doz 

Burrell's Pipe, each 

Pocket , per doz 25 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 

Royal Canadian.. " .... 

Royal American., " .... 

Sampson " — 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



7 00 
6 00 
3 40 
3 00 
2 90 

33 00 
24 00 
24 00 
24 00 




ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 

"Pullman" 

Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No. 14. 

Pullman Sash Bal. Co. 
Rochester. N.Y., U.S.A. 

Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 






I 



STEVENS SINGLE BARREL SHOT GUN. 



I 

I, 



LATEST AND 
BEST SINGLE 
GUN ON THE 
MARKET. 




MADE IN 
THREE STYLES 
THREE GAUGES 
UP-TO-DATE. 



FINEST SINGLE GUN YET PRODUCED. 

Our Goods are Handled by the Leading Jobbers. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 



aCKNOWLEOOED THE BEST 



i 



I J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2I ? 0X Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. k 




R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



NBW YORK OFFICE], 90 ChaakaraM. 
NEWARK, N.J.. U.S.A. 



ONTARIO 

NUT WORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto berepresentedin Canada. 

"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 



Cables- 
Machinery," Newport. 



Emlyn Engineering Works, 
Newport, Mon., England. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

„ . . , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 




WRIGHT'S 

Insect 
Sprayers 

PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 



•BEST ON EARTH." 



Manufactured by 

E. T.WRIGHT &C0. 

HAMILTON, ONT., and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

J. H. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



WHERE 



OUR LARCE NEW FACTORY Shears, Scissors, 

Razors, Butcher 
Knives and other 
Cutlery are made 

ms^. Dy 

BAILEY CUTLERY 

CO,, Limited 

% 3& 




BRANTFORD, ONT. 

Write for catalogue and prices. 



CHAS. P. CLARK. President. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices: Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New Tork City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and the 
controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information, no effort is spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify its claim as an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
furnishes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C, IRVING. Gen. Man, Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON. Gen. Man, Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



inn 


■P^B 


■ H J M 


^UttHj^:- ^H 


1 BMttl 




Established Cable Address, 


in 

1 




1832. "Bliss." 






MANUFACTURERS 




Harl ^^^T^^^ 


Wood Turnings, Hand 


B 


p^^^^^^B^ajaMnJaaj 


Bench and other Screws 

Mallets, Handles, Vises 

Clamps, Tool Chests 

Croquet, Lithographs 

Wood Toys, Novelties 


H -■.(■■ 


^^^^^^^^^"^*H 


fr H 




and also the celebrated 


If 


Wood's Patent Car 
Gate 


i .-'• ■~*^ s mEffijM 


f^ - 'df ■* *— >*<r9| ' 


For Street and Steam Rail- 






road Cars. 


a»g — lillH 




The R. BLISS MFG. CO. 


^P--l '~- e, - ^ qgs riy^ T . 




Pawtucket, R.I., U.S.A. 


■heMBala^a^fll 



Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1825. 75 YEARS. 



Use Syracu 



Babbitt Metal 



; IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc;, always In stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q 

American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Gold Street, New York. 



Syracuse Smelting: Works 



!! 




Inc. 1895 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ^s^^^^ju^ Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS ^ 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




PATENT INTERLOCKING 

RUBBER TILING. 

The most perfect floor covering for Hotels, 
Cafes, Business Offices, Banks, Court Rooms, 
Churches, Hospitals, Vestibules, Halls, Billiard 
and Smoking Rooms, Lavatories and Bath Rooms. 

NOISELESS NON-SLIPPERY 

WATERPOOF SANITARY 

Carefully selected range of soft, beautiful 
colors affording ample scope for combinations in 
harmony with surroundings. 

Write for Prices and Particulars. 



Sola Canadian Manufacturers 



The Gutta Peroha and Rubber Mfg. Co. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms— 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



>^%r%%r%%r%%%%/»%>^%/f,y%/f,y%^%/%r%/%r%* 



Factories- 1 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 



CANADA. 



CASTOR OIL 



BRITISH MANDFAGTDRED. 



We have a full stock of 



Pharmaceutical 
First Pressure 
Second Pressure 

In Barrels and Cases. 

Prices from stock and to import on application. 

B. & S. H. THOMPSON & CO. 

LIMITED 

53 St. Sulpice Street, 

MONTREAL. 



VARNISHES and JAPANS 

McCASKILL, OOUGALL & CO. 



Manufacturers 



MONTREAL 




Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Wont I urn white from the effects of water and sun. 

Standard Piano, Fnrnitnre and Decorative Varnishes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and VarnisLo 
Architectural Varnishes 



OFFICES : 

161 Summer St., 30 St. John St., 

BOSTON. Mass., U.S.A. MONTREAL. 



The Best Value for all Machinery 

Bearings, 

LANGWELL'S BABBIT 

Montreal. 



e^f 



^ 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 12, 1902 



NO. 28. 



\^ MANUFACTURER ^"«Cf 

ARROW#BRAND 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

% HARDWARE j 

e ^y SPECIALITIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 




Wholesale Hardwar 



Galvanized Iron 

equal to 
"Queen's Head" 

has not yet been made. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 



44 



That Made the Hit 



11 



f?ET/r 




uVlJB This is a drawing of the Patent Connection 
f % that made the "SAFFORD" famous the world 
over; that revolutionized radiator building; that 
made it possible to put a radiator together with- 
out bolts, red lead, rods or packing. 

The "SAFFORD" is the only radiator on 
the market for hot-water and steam heating. It means satisfaction every 
time — is easy to handle for the contractor. 

If you have mot our Catalogue, write to us. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 



Head Office and Works: DUFFERIN ST. 



TORONTO, CAN. 



HOSE 
O 

5 

E 



and LAWN 
MOWERS 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Write for Catalogue and Prices. 



We Carry in Stock a Full Line of the Following Goods 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Canada Plates. 
Copper — Bar and Ingot. 

Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 

Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 
Copperine and Babbitt. 
Cotton Waste. 
Crucibles. 
Eave Trough — Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks 

ENQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 
Galvanized, " Gordon Crown." 
Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 

Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 

Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 

Lead Pipe. 

Solder — Half and Half and Standard. 

Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat 

Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 

Tin— Bar. 

Ingot, " L. & F." and Straits. 

Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 

Zinc — Sheets and Block. 

PLEASE WRITE TOR QUOTATIONS. 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 



27 Wellington St. West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



English House : SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 164 Fenchnrch St., LONDON, E.C. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



GARDEN HOSE 

Seamless Tube 



SEAMLESS TUBE 



LAPPED TUBE 




All brands of our GARDEN HOSE are 

made with our 

Patent Seamless Tube 



WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Lightning;, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 




ARE 

. Well Advertised. 
In Demand. 
Easily Sold. 
Satisfactory in Use. 
Of Known Reputation. 





EXCEL IN 



Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops. 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers. 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free. 



Easy Running 
Quick Freezing. 
Economy. 
Convenience. 
Practical Results. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phi,ade Jl h A ia ' Pa ' 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




No. 104 



No. 112 



WEDGE POINT 

Dealer's Card on Head in Gross Lots. 

No. 110 



NEEDLE POINT. 



WEDGE POINT SPRING PICK 

No. 113 Dealer's Card on Head in Gross Lots. 





WEDGE POINT SPRING PICK 
Splits Ice like an Axe. 

ANTNRUST NICKEL-PLATED. 



WALKER'S QUICK AND EASY ICE PICKS. 

ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



Steel Tempered ; will not Bend, 
Break or Rust. 



FREE INSURANCE AGAINST FIRE 




""BEST 



Plaster 



Fire Proof 
Frost » 
Sound " 

Will not cn^ck. 



Wili Hold Up a Shelf ! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 
than the .... 
BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light- 

The saving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 

BW Orderdirector through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 



The Best Ready Roofing on Earth. 




TRINIDAD ASPHALT MFG. CO. 

Asphalt and Asbestine Gravelled 
READY ROOFING 

WITH INTERLOCKING LAP. 

Fire, water, acid or gas proof. 
Shipped with cement and nails for laying. 

ASPHALT. PAINT, CEMENT, COATING, HOOF- 
ING, DEADENING and SLATERS' FELT. BUILD- 
ING and INSULATING PAPER of all kinds. The 
trade supplied. Prices and samples from the 

Canada Supply Co,, Agents, Windsor, Ont, 



STOVE BRICK 

FIRECLAY AND ASBESTOS 
FURNACE CEMET 

all kinds of Fire Clay Products made to order from 
patterns. Write us for varieties and prices. 

JONES BROS., Bracondale. P.O., Ont 

(near Toronto.) 



Lace Leather 

Send direct to us for the celebrated 
" NIAGARA " Brand Lace Leather, best 
produced in this country. Yellow and 
White in Sides or Cut Strings. Prices and 
Samples on application. 

WOOD BROS. 

Tanners of High-Class Leathers, 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



BISHOP & CO. 



Established 
1850. 



27 and 28 Little Trinity Lane, 



LONDON, ENG. 



54 Scotland St., SHEFFIELD 

Table Cutlery, all qualities. 



23 Vittoria St.. BIRMINGHAM 

Wrought Steel Pots, round or oval. 



Samples on view at the following Agencies : — 

Alex. Thurber, 446 St. Paul St., 

E. Fielding, 34 Yonge St., 

E. L. Denoncourt, 74 St. Joseph St., 



Tinned inside or ename'led. 

MONTREAL. 

TORONTO. 

QUEBEC. 



WIRE ROPE 



Wire Rope. 



OF. 




All Kinds and Sizes 



AND FOR 

All Purposes. 

PRICES RIGHT. PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 

The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 

Black Beauty 
Leather Dressing. 



An absolute black, free from acid. Will not rot stitches, 
but preserves the leather. Renews color and life of a 
harness, no matter how old, red and stiff. Weather and 

water proof. 

Ask your dealer for it. If he has none in stock ask us 
for sample and price. 

We are sole agents for Canada. 






The Zanzibar Paint Co., Limited, 



Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



OUR 3 LEADING SELLERS. SPECIAL VALUE 

PRICE CONSIDERED THEV.HAVE NO EQUAL. 



WELL FINISHED. 
ALL PARTS ARE 
CLOSE FITTING. 



PLACE ORDERS NOW 
FOR FALL DELIVERY. 




No. Gauge Barrel ins. Lbs. 
910 1 16 30 ey to 7 



950 



12 

10 



Twist Barrels, rebounding back action locks, circular hammers, block strikers, top snap, extended rib, checkered 
pistol grip, checkered patent fore end, steel butt plate. 



••n -VtnK ( DAMASCUS BARRELS, bar locks, circular hammers, top snap, Greener triple bolt, case hardened mountings, 

a tX 01/ '! matted extended rib, checkered pistol grip with rubber cap, Deeley and Edge checkered patent fore end, rubber 
M .i 10 y/ 2 ^ butt p]ate left ^rrei ful i cno ke bored. 



95o 



12 



30 



7>£to8 



DAMASCUS BARRELS, freed bar rebounding locks, richly engraved: circular hammers, top snap, Greener 
triple bolt, solid plungers, matted extended rib, checkered pistol grip with rubber cap, Anscn and Deeley check- 
ered patent fore end, rubber butt plate, both barrels medium choked. A well finished gun throughout. 



HAVE 

YOU 

OUR 

NEW 

GUN 

CATALOG 

? 




IT 

COVERS 
ALL 
THE 
SPORTSMEN'S 
WANTS. 



No. 3 ELTERICH RIFLED BULLET SHELL, converts the shotgun into a rifle; for 32-20 Winchester Smokeless Cartridges, for inserting into 12 and 
16-gauge single or double barrel shotgun. Length, 4 inches. Practicable up to 300 yards. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the Celebrated 



\Z2 



JS 



HRS&C 

BAR IRON, HOOPS, CHAIN 

VERY LOW PRICES. 

Canadian Office : 
6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TINWARE AND TIN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
Jacketed Oil Cans, 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Pails, Etc. 

JAS. A. McGOLPIN 

156-162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



THE 



DANDY SHINER 

(nickel plated) 
A HOUSEHOLD NECESSITY 




Holds shoe rigid. Fits any shoe. 3 lasts (men's, 
women's, child's) go with each shiner. 

Write for wholesale price to 

L. H. Packard & Co., Montreal. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited, 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan - American Exposition, 




MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

SISAL pnpr Lath Yarn, Shingle Yarn, Hide DIMnrp TUflMC 
MANILA KUKt, Cor(Ji p u , p cord? Clothes Lines BmUtK 'WIHE 

Transmission Rope a Specialty. 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

44 Maxwell Favorite Churn " Lawn Mowers. KWVSfc 




PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improv- 
ed for season of igo2. Steel or Wood Frame 
as desired. 

WheelbarrOWS. * Four different Sizes. 



Steel Frame Churn 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



widths. Cold Rolled 
Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



KNOX HENRY 



Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32 Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 



'SECCOTINE" 



FOR STICKING EVERYTHING. 

ifi 



j;:"--""-""---V 




Sample 



sent free on application. h 

Brand Horse - Nails 



HORSE NAILS-" C 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 

" BRASSITE" GOODS — Gunn Castor Co. 
Limited, Birmingham, Kng. 

WATERBURY 
"ST BRASS CO. 

Main Office and Mills at Watcrbury, Conn. 

New York Store, No. 122 to No. 130 Centre St. 

Providence Store, No. 1S1 Dorrance St. and 

No. 152 Eddy St. 

Pope's Island "White" 

and 

"Gold Non-Coimsive Metal" 

Suitable for Spinning, Drawing, Stamp- 
ing and Jewelers' Work. 

Brass, German Silver, Bronze and 
Copper in Sheets, Wire Rods, Brazed 
and Seamless Tubing. Metallic Eyelets, 
Shells, Ferrules and small brass wares 
of every description. 



The Telephone 

has no equal as a saver of time 
and money for the buying and selling 
of goods from distant points. 

The travelling salesman found this 
out long ago. Others are learning 
the truth daily. Bear it in mind. 



WESTERN 

XX ACCURAL 



Incorporated 
I8SI 



ASSURANCE COMPANY 



Fire and Marine 



Ilif. BELL TELEPHONE 
CO. Or CANADA. 



Capital 

Assets, over - 
Annual Income 



$2,000,000.00 
2,900,000.00 
3,000,000.00 

Head Office : TORONTO, ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. J.J. Kenny, Vice-President. 
C. C. Foster, Secretary. 




"DAISY" CHURN oe 

Has tempered steel cased bicycle ball bearings, strongest, neat- 
est and most convenient frame. Only two bolts to adjust in 
setting up. Steel Bow Levers, suitable for either a standing or 
sitting posture. Has four wheels and adjustable feet to hold 
stand steady while churning. When churn is locked to stand 
the bow can be used as handles to move it about on the front 
wheels as handy as a baby carriage. Open on both sides to 
centre, giving free space for pail. Made with wood or steel 
stands, with Cranks only, or Bow Levers as desired. 



Vollmar 
Perfect 
Washer 



Has a most enviable record. A 
perfection of its kind — will wash 
more clothes in less time, do it better 
and easier, with less wear and tear, 
than any other machine. 



The Wortman & Ward Mfg. Co., 



LONDON, ONT. 

Eastern Branch, 6o McGill Street, Montreal, Que. 



Limited 



Luxfer Prisms! 



1 he best investment for 

Improving Business 

Premises. 



\\^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV\ 



Why 



do up-to-date busi- 
ness men install Luxfer 
Prisms in their store 
fronts or any place they 
are short of light ? 

H 

WRITE US. 




Interior Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto. 
Prisms in Front Windows. 



-wwwwwwwwwwvwvw 

Because 

to get the best re- 
sults they must have the 
best goods. Thus ob- 
taining good clear white 

light which makes it 

easy to show and sell 
goods. 

WVWWWWWWVWWWWWI 

mm 



Luxfer Prism Co., Limited 

100 King Street West, - - TORONTO, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDELIBLO PAINT 




"4 wiii^g 



MIXES WITH COLD WATER 

comes in dry powder only. 5 lbs. will make a gallon of 
paint. Sells all the way from 5c. up to ioc, according 
to color. Waterproof, washable, sanitary, fireproof. No 
smell. No mess. The colors are rich and durable. 
The white is the purest in tone. Splendid for large 
buildings, factories, breweries, elevators, also shafts and 
alleyways. Ask for color card and complete price list. 
Money in it. 

Agents : 



A. RAMSAY £> SON, 
J. II. ASMDOWN, 

Mclennan, mcfeely & co., - 



MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 

VANCOUVER 



THE TIME TO INSURE IS 



NOW 



While you are WELL, STRONG and INSURABLE. 



THE 



Confederation 
Life 

ASSOCIATION issues policies on all approved plans 
of insurance, and is a prosperous and progressive 
Canadian Company. 

PROTECTION FOR YOUR FAMILY. 
PROFITABLE INVESTMENT FOR YOURSELF. 

Pamphlets and full information sent on application. 

W. H. Beatty, Esq., 

PRESIDENT. 

W. D. Matthews, Esq,, Frederick Wyld, Esq,, 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



W. C. MACOONALD, 

ACTUARY. 

HEAD OFFICE. 



J. K. MACOONALD, 

MANAGING DIRECTOR. 

TORONTO. 




*£ Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

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Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

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Post Office Chambers. 

Park Row Building. 



- 42 Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 



m in 



™ rag: 



UM/TED. 



WE LEAD 

IN THE flANUFACTURE OF : 

Cold Pressed Nuts, 
Square and Hexagon, 
Finished and Semi-Finished, 
Cap Screws, 
Set Screws, 
Thumb Screws, Bolts, 
Special Milled Work, etc. 

Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 

14-16 King St. East, TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



GOODELL 

Automatic Screw 



Drivers 




Are Simplest in Construction, Most 
Practical in their Working, and 
are undoubtedly the Best 
Selling Tools of this 
character on the 
market. 



REVERSIBLE 

For both Right and 
Left Hand Work 

Our No. 22, for both driving and draw- 
ing screws automatically, is unquestionably 
the finest piece of mechanical ingenuity ever 
produced. 



GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY, 



GREENFIELD, MASS.. U.S.A. 



DECATUR, BULL & CO., Resident Agents. - MONTREAL 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 





LOCkS and 

Builders' Hardware. 

We have a most complete line of all these goods, including the 
very newest ideas in 

Bronze and Brass Knobs, 
Door Sets and Escutcheons. 



LOCKS AND LATCHES OF ALL KINDS. 

Any dealer asking for a catalogue will be sent full prices, discount sheets, etc., etc. Drop a card. 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 



t tfj^, 



INCORPORATED 1893. 



TnE Gurney-Tilden Co M L 

Hamilton. Toronto. Montreal. 



IMIIED 



AGENCIES I— ST. JOHN, N. B„ VANCOUVER, B. C. 



FOR PRESERVING TIME 



Kemp's 
Enameled 
Preserving 
Kettles 




10 SIZES, 3 TO 30 QUARTS, 
rianufactured in three popular grades 

DIAMOND 

PEARL 

GRANITE 

How is your stock ? You should not be short at this time of 
the year. We are prepared to supply your requirements 
promptly on receipt of order. 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO. 

TORONTO, CAN. 



THE TORONTO SILVER PLATE CO,, Limited 



. . . MANUFACTURERS OF . 



Sterling Silver and Electro Silver Plate. 




No. 1355— Ping Pong Cup. 



NOT In the TRUST 

or MEMBERS of any 

SILVERWARE 

ASSOCIATION 

or COMBINE. 



If interested in 
any kind of Prize 
Trophies, and 
similar goods, 
write for our 
special Prize Cup 
Catalogue, a copy 
of which we will 
be pleased to 
mail to the tradjj 
on application. 



Factories and 
Salesrooms : 

King St. West 
Toronto, Can. 

E: G. Gooderham 
Man. -Director. 




VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 12, 1902. 



NO. 28. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
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•WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



BUNGLING ALDERMEN. 

HARDWARE AND METAL has time 
and again pointed out the necessity 
of electing business men to the 
different municipal councils throughout the 
country, as well as to the Provincial and 
Dominion Parliaments. 

The necessity of such business men is 
again being evidenced in Toronto at the 
present time. Six months ago the rate- 
payers of that city voted a large sum of 
money for the erection of new buildings for 
the Industrial Exhibition, Since then the 



matter has been dilly-dallied with. The 
contract for the ironwork [for the main 
building was not signed until well into May, 
and now The Canada Foundry Company, 
who secured the tender, has notified the 
city authorities that they cannot complete 
the work in time. 

This is just what might have been ex- 
pected after the unnecessary delay of four 
months, especially in view of the well- 
known scarcity of pig iron, which has 
handicapped every user of that material in 
this country, as well as in the United States 
for some time. 

To have deferred signing the contract 
until well into May, while the buildings 
were to be ready for the Exhibition, which 
opens in the latter part of August, was 
simply absurd. If the matter had been left 
in the hands of half a dozen business men, 
it is altogether likely that the contract would 
have been signed months before it was, and 
the work would have been by this time 
nearly completed. 

Time and time again we have have been 
taught at heavy cost lessons regarding the 
folly of sending undesirable men to repre- 
sent us in municipal and parliamentary 
bodies, but still we keep along in much 
about the same old rut, and the result is the 
natural bungling, which is only to be 
expected. Grapes cannot be gathered from 
thistles. 



A physical culture teacher says the proper 
way to go up stairs is to hold the head 
erect and expand the chest. Most of us 
still believe that the proper way is to go up 
by the elevator. 



STEEL IS RATHER EASIER. 

A RATHER easier tone has developed 
in the steel market during the last 
week or two. This is particularly 
true in regard to bars and in the lighter 
gauges of steel sheets. This weakness does 
not appear to have affected the other lines 
of steel, and it is expected that when the 
midsummer quietude is over there will be a 
reaction in favor of firmer prices. This, in 
view of the strong situation in pig iron, is 
a natural consequence. Another factor 
which will tend to bring about firmer prices 
is the fact that a number of the steel mills 
are closing down for the usual midsummer 
repairs, and for the purpose of giving the 
employes holidays. The American Sheet 
Co. alone has closed down over 100 of 
its mills. 

As an indication of the strong position of 
the pig iron market in the United States, it 
is only necessary to note that, although the 
production in June was about 200,000 tons 
greater than in January last, the demand 
still exceeds the supply. Besides this there 
is to be taken into consideration the coal 
strike, which naturally increases the scarcity 
of fuel. The shortage of coke, for example, 
last week was even more pronounced than 
it has been for some time. 

Compared with the average price of last 
year the United States No. 1 foundry pig 
iron is at present over $6.50 per ton higher 
and steel billets approximately $g per ton 
higher. 

In Canada the situation remains much 
the same as it has been for some weeks 
past, particularly in regard to pig iron, 
which is still scarce and in good demand. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WANT GRAIN AND LUMBER ON THE FREE LIST. 



RECIPROCITY with Canadais a ques- 
tion that is likely to receive some 
attention at the next session of the 
United States Congress. At any rate, the 
Minnesota delegation in the House of 
Representatives seem bent on seeing that it 
does receive attention. It was intimated a 
few days prior to the adjournment of the 
House that a B ill would be introduced in 
favor of reciprocity and putting Canadian 
lumber, wood pulp and grain on the free 
list. It was, however, finally deemed 
advisable to leave the question in abeyance 
until next session, as it was felt that no good 
would be done to the cause by any such 
formal action at present. In the meanwhile, 
it is proposed to prepare plans and inaugur- 
ate a vigorous campaign next season in favor 
of reciprocity with Canada. In order to over- 
come the difficulties and delay entailed in 
an ordinary reciprocity treaty, the proposal 
appears to be to call upon the Joint High 
Commission to look into the question and 
recommend some satisfactory arrangement. 

Hitherto the centre of the movement for 
reciprocity with Canada has been in the 
New England States with the business 
interests in New York a strong supporter of 
the idea. It is, therefore, significant to see 
the movement obtaining such headway in 
the Northwest. The motive, however, is 
not the same in the west as it is in the east. 
The advocates of reciprocity in the west 
want Canadian lumber, wood pulp and 
grain, the last named for grinding into flour 
in the mills at Minneapolis. They are not 
much concerned about the question of pro- 
tection to the manufacturing industries of 
the country. The manufacturers in the 
east, however, are very much interested in 
this particular. They want protection and 
want it just as high as ever, but they want 
the Canadian market as well. They are 
extremely generous in regard to the shadow, 
but the substance they grapple to their 
breast with zealous hands. 

Even in the west, where the reciprocity 
idea is said by the Washington correspond- 
ent of The Journal of Commerce, New 
York, to be growing, the farmers are likely 
to set their faces against the proposal to 
admit Canadian lumber and grain at lower 
rates of duty. 



Canada's export of wheat to the United 
States last year was only 53,186 bushels. 
Of grain of all kinds, except beans, the 
quantity was only 463,233 bushels, while 
the total to all countries was 25,282,512 
bushels, of which 9,738,758 bushels were 
wheat. 

Taking lumber and manufactures thereof 
the value of the exports to the United 
States in 1901 was $13,176,717, which was 
about $3,000,000 less than five years 
before. The total value of our exports to 
all countries last year was about $33,000,000, 
and our best customer is Great Britain, 
which in 1901 took $17,301,960 worth, an 
increase during the five years of almost the 
same amount as the decrease during that 
period on United States account. 

At present the United States Customs 
duties on grain, pulp and lumber are as 
follows : Barley, 30c. per bushel ; buck- 
wheat, 15c. per bushel ; oats. 15c. per 
bushel ; rye, 10c. per bushel ; wheat, 25c. 
per bushel; mechanically ground wood pulp, 
one-twelfth of one cent per lb.; chemical 
wood pulp, unbleached, one-sixth of one 
cent per lb. ; ditto, bleached, one-fourth of 
one cent per lb.; sawed boards, planks, 
deals, etc., $1 to $2 per 1,000 feet. 

With a material reduction in the United 
States duty on those articles our exports to 
that country would undoubtedly increase. 
But we see nothing to anticipate in the near 
future any such reduction. No matter how 
earnest the Minnesota delegation in the 
House of Representatives may be, there 
are contending forces in the United States 
which are stronger than they. 

Economically closer trade relations be- 
tween Canada and the United States are 
desirable. But, unfortunately, political 
exigencies transcend economical require- 
ments. 



I 



HOLIDAYING IN THE MARITIME 
PROVINCES. 

T is gratifying for Hardware and 

Metal to note that business men in 

Ontario are taking more interest in the 

Maritime Provinces as a summer resort. 

There is undoubtedly no part of this 

continent which affords greater attraction 

for tired business men who are seeking a 

holiday. The scenery is grand and the 



climate delightful and bracing, and there 
is a variety of sport for those who are fond 
of the rod or gun. 

The tourist associations, such as those 
at St. John and Halifax, as well as the 
Intercolonial Railway, are doing a good 
work in acquainting the west with ' e 
attractions which the Maritime Provinces 
afford as a summer resort. There is still, 
however, a great deal to be done in this 
respect, for we find in conversing with 
business men in the west, who are thinking 
of taking trips to the Maritime Provinces 
during the summer months, that they have 
very little definite information as to routes, 
hotels, etc. 



AN UNJUST INSINUATION. 

IN his address of welcome to the con- 
vention of the ironmoulders in To- 
ronto on Monday, Mayor Howland 
insinuated that President Ames, of the 
Toronto Board of Trade, and his fellow 
associates who were instrumental in securing 
a settlement of the street railway strike, 
were merely a committee representing the 
Street Railway Co. This was a most 
unfortunate statement for His Worship to 
have made, as it is well known that but 
for the business-like way and untiring zeal 
of the representatives of the Board of Trade 
the strike would not have been settled when 
it was. And this would not have been the 
worst feature of the situation, for after the 
rioting which had taken place on the 
Sunday previous to the settlement of the 
strike, it is no telling what might have 
happened, as there were undoubtedly a 
large number of hoodlums, sympathizing 
with the strikers, who were ready to do 
almost anything to prevent the cars being 
run by any other than union employes. 
Besides this, there was the great incon- 
venience which the public would have 
suffered from long stoppage of the street car 
service. 

His Worship has heretofore not resorted 
to the methods of the ward politician in 
public affairs. If there has ever been a 
gentleman occupying the position of chief 
magistrate in Toronto it is Mayor Howland, 
but one cannot think otherwise than that 
in the present instance he has dropped 
what has hitherto been his practice, and 
followed a course more akin to that of the 
professional or ward politician. 

It may not have been that he was talking 
for votes, but it looks extremely like it 
indeed, and we very much regret that he 
has tried to belittle the successful efforts of 
a body of business men whose sole object 
was the public good. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



THE BINDER TWINE SITUATION. 



The Views of a 

WE have more than once reported a 
growing scarcity in binder twine ; 
and the subject has recently been 
attracting the attention of those interested 
iJ 1 agriculture throughout the country, more 
particularly in the West, where another 
heavy wheat crop is expected. 

It is, no doubt, a puzzle to many why it 
is that a shortage in the supply so frequently 
occurs ; and the manufacturer is usually 
blamed, without being given a hearing. 

The representative of a Winnipeg agri- 
cultural manufacturing concern said recently 
to a newspaper reporter that a great scar- 
city of binder twine was expected during 
the coming season, as the crops would be 
unusually large; and he added: "Of 
course, this is a source of trouble that is as 
certain as the seasons, but is becoming a 
more serious factor with Canadian farmers 
annually, because of the increased quantity 
of twine consumed, as a result of the in- 
creased wheat acreage." 

If it were true that the scarcity of binder 
twine were an annual occurrence, it cer- 
tainly would seem that manufacturers were 
to blame. But this is not so. The largest 
manufacturers state that there has frequently 
been a surplus stock on the market, which 
they have had to carry over for a year, 
entailing a considerable expense. And as 
the margin on binder twine, for manufac- 
turers as well as jobbers, is a small one, it 
takes a comparatively small expense of this 
kind to offset the profits. 

In discussing the subject with a repre- 
sentative of Hardware and Metal, a 
prominent Canadian manufacturer of cord- 
age and binder twine said that, as the 
demand for the latter was put off until the 
latest time possible and its extent depended 
wholly upon the size of the crops, the 
business of manufacturing binder twine was 
of the most speculative character. 

"We must make the twine," he con- 
tinued, " long before any idea of what the 
crops will be like, and we can form no idea 
whatever as to how much will be used. 
Both the wholesale and retail trades buy to 
a great extent from hand to mouth, and the 
big demand for binder twine comes in a 
rusa just before the harvesting. We ship 
practically all the twine in June and July. 
Last year there was a shortage, and we had 
to start in at the eleventh hour to manufac- 
ture again. The farmer won't buy his 
twine till he actually needs it, with the 
result that the retailer does not do so either. 
He prefers the jobber to carry the stock, 
who, in his turn, allows the manufacturer 
to carry it. If it were for only a short time 



Manufacturer. 

we could do so. But we must manufacture 
in the fall ; then we cannot ship till next 
summer and do not receive payments until 
the following October. At the close price 
we have to sell it is impossible to do that. 

"The trouble is that the United States 
manufacturers have us and the Canadian 
farmer at their mercy. Fully 75 per cent. 
of the binder twine used in this country 
comes from the United States. There is no 
duty on it, though the United States Gov- 
ernment imposes a duty on binder twine 
going from Canada into that country. 
The result has been that Canadian manu- 
facturers can only dispose of about 25 per 
cent. — or, at the outside, 30 per cent. — of 
what they used to sell. The harvesting 
season in the United States comes earlier 
than in Canada, and manufacturers in that 
country can turn out considerably more than 
they can sell there, and count on dumping 
their surplus stock in this country. The 
worst feature of that is that much of the 
United States twine sent to this country is 
made by manufacturers of agricultural 
implements, with whom binder-twine manu- 
facturing is only a side issue, so to speak, 
and they are willing to sell it at absolutely 
unremunerative prices, in order to forward 
their business in their principal lines. 

"Now, when the crops in the United 
States are small, their manufacturers have 
a lot of twine for disposal in Canada. There 
is no shortage there. But when the crops 
are larger than usual, sufficient twine is 
needed to take up what American manu- 
facturers have made, then there is none left 
for Canada, and a scarcity occurs — for 
which the Canadian manufacturer is blamed. 
If this is to be stopped, it is to the interest 
of the consumer as well as the manufacturer 
to have a duty placed on United States 
twine, which will keep these manufacturers 
out of this market ; or, at least, to protect 
the home manufacturer so that he can do 
business on an equal footing with the Am- 
erican. At present this is not the case, for, 
while no duty is charged on foreign twine 
coming into Canada, we have to pay more 
for our raw material. 

" In March last the American Govern- 
ment placed an export duty on all manila 
hemp (which is the chief item in making 
binder twine), going out of the Philippines. 
This is about ftc. per lb. But when the 
hemp was brought to the United States for 
consumption there the duty was refunded to 
the purchasers. So that the American 
manufacturer can buy his hemp for y % c. 
per lb. less than we can. This gives him a 
direct advantage over Canadian manufac- 



turers in our own market, since he doesn't 
pay a cent of duty to this country. 

' ' That is the state of things to-day. 
There is no monopoly of the binder twine 
business here, and no danger of one, with 
the different farmers' cooperative companies 
in the business as well as the products of 
the penitentiaries. So that the fear of high 
prices, if any exists, is groundless. But 
the frequent shortages in the supply of 
binder twine must continue as long as the 
Canadian farmer depends on the surplus 
stock of American factories and on the size 
of the crops in the United States." 



THE INVERNESS (N.S.) RAILWAY. 

MR. WILLIAM MACKENZIE, in an 
interview the other day spoke as 
follows of The Inverness Railway 
and Coal Company, in which Mackenzie 
& Mann are interested : We have been 
developing the mines for two years and for 
the last year have been shipping 300 tons 
daily. The coal is similar to that mined by 
the Dominion Coal Company, whose mines 
are close to ours. We employ 200 men at 
present, but this number will be gradually 
increased from now on. By next spring 
we confidently expect to ship one thousand 
tons daily. We are now busy erecting a 
shipping pier, and by August will be ready 
to ship coal to Montreal and local points. 
We will then have a railway 61 miles long 
built, which will greatly facilitate our busi- 
ness. We have commenced the construc- 
tion of the Halifax South- Western Railway 
from Halifax to Yarmouth. In connection 
with it we the other day took over the Nova 
Scotia Central, running from Lunenburg to 
the Dominion Atlantic at Middleton. This 
embraces 74 miles of railway, and we 
closed the deal for it last Saturday. This 
road will become part of the Halifax South- 
western. 

Mr. Mackenzie said his company had 
been locating the above line for the past 
year. Five gangs of engineers were now 
at work on this job, and construction work 
would be commenced at once. When 
finished the new line will be 170 miles long. 



BOWSER OIL TANK IN EUROPE. 

Mr. Rosser McClure, who has been 
Canadian manager for S. F. Bowser & Co. 
for the past three years, leaves next month 
to introduce the Bowser oil tank in Great 
Britain and Ireland. 

There have been numerous inquiries 
from the Old Country, and Mr. McClure is 
confident of doing a large volume of busi- 
ness over there. It is more than likely he 
will also open up trade in Russia. He will 
leave matters in the Toronto office in 
competent hands during his absence. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PIPE FOUNDRY BURNED. 

ON Monday evening, July 7, the entire 
plant and buildings of the Montreal 
Pipe Foundry Co., Londonderry, 
N.S., were destroyed by fire, which started 
from the rolling mills and spread quickly 
over the remainder of the plant. These mills 
were bought by the Montreal Pipe Foundry 
Company about three years ago, and have 
been operated continuously ever since. 
Last spring a great deal of new machinery 
was installed, for turning out some large 
contracts for pipe. 

More than 100 men have been employed 
recently by the mills, which were running 
on full time, and a very large business has 
been done by the company. The works 
were the largest of their kind east of Mont- 
real, and the only ones in the Maritime 
Provinces. 

Some of the stock was saved from the 
fire, but it will be a long time before the 
mills can be built and put into operation 
again. Besides the plant and buildings of 
the mills, several houses in the village 
caught fire, and much damage was caused. 



SHERWIN-WILLIAMS WON. 

Judge Morgan gave judgment in favor of 
the Sherwin-Williams Co. for #77 in the 
case of Sherwin-Williams Co. vs. E. L. 
Sawyer Co., on July 4th. Mr. Benson, 
city agent for the Sherwin Williams Co., 
whose headquarters are at Montreal, claimed 
that he sold a quantity of paint, valued at 
$148 to what he believed to be E. L. Sawyer 
& Co., brokers in the Canada Life Building. 
The paint was to be used for painting the 
steamer Queen City, then at Port Dalhousie. 
Mr. Benson received his first order, he 
stated, from a Mr. Hicks, and afterwards 
telephoned the Sawyer Co., who he believed, 
confirmed it. The "Queen City" was 
controlled last year by the Toronto Naviga- 
tion Company, and was to be used to catch 
Pan-American excursions. The company 
subsequently went into liquidation, and Mr. 
Sawyer claims that the paint bill should be 
paid by them, and not by him, as it was a 
syndicate that controlled the boat, and that 
he was not mixed up in the syndicate. The 
paint was ordered and sent in April, 1901, 
and has not been paid for since. 



A NEW PATENT DIE. 

Messrs. Decatur, Bull & Co., Montreal, 
have been appointed sole agents in Canada 
for the " Economy " die, manufactured by 
F. E. Wells & Son, Greenfield, Mass. This 
is the first appearance of this die on the 
Canadian market, although in the United 
States it has had an immense sale for the 
past two years. It is different from the 



solid die, in that, to a certain extent, it is 
hollowed out, thus requiring less steel in 
the construction, so that not only can better 
steel be used than in the ordinary die, but it 
can be sold at a lower price. They are 
said to be the most accurate and the fastest 
cutting die on the market ; and they are 
fully guaranteed. The handles are of 
knurled steel pipe, beautifully finished. 
This is the only die of its kind in the world 
and it is bound to be an immense success 
on this market. 



CUTLERY FOR BENEDICT 
MORRISON. 

Daniel Morrison, traveller for Rice Lewis 
& Son, Limited, was presented by the 
"employes of the firm with a fine cutlery 
cabinet on the occasion of his marriage. 



NEW HARDWARE STORE. 

E. Cameron & Co. will open early in 
July their new hardware store on the London 
House corner, Charlottetown, P.E.I. Mr. 
Cameron has been in business with a lead- 
ing firm of that city for the past 1 3 years 
and is accordingly well acquainted with the 
trade. 

ELECTRICALLY PRODUCED LEAD. 

A consignment of the first pig lead pro- 
duced in Canada on a commercial scale by 
electricity was made to Winnipeg recently 
by the Trail smelter, and shipments of pig 
lead will be continued regularly to eastern 
Canada. This process in which electricity 
is used in place of fire methods will, it it 
claimed, as completely replace the old fire 
methods in lead refining as has been the 
case in copper refining. 

The success of this plant insures the con- 
struction of a large refinery by the Trail 
people, and it is understood that plans are 
being prepared for a plant which will turn 
out 50 or 60 tons of pig lead daily. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

A STRIKING IDEA. 

A striking idea in advertising is shown in 
the card just issued by The Burrow, Stewart 
& Milne Co., Limited, of Hamilton, manu- 
facturers of the Imperial Standard scales. 
A card, not too large to be sent by mail, has 
the representation of balances astride a 
hole in the top, through which to insert a 
pin. The receivers of the card read beneath 
the balances the following : "In justice to 
yourself, hang this card in your office as a 
reminder that the supreme degree in the 
building of scales of all capacities is attained 
in Hamilton by The Burrow, Stewart & 
Milne Co. . Limited, the manufacturers ot 
Imperial Standard scales. Ask for prices 
and descriptive catalogue." 



SILVERWARE FOR LONG BAY 
POINT HOTEL. 

The silverware for the "Bay Cliff" hotel, 
the new and magnificently fiurnished hotel 
at Long Biy Point, Port Rowan, was manu- 
factured specially to order by The Toronto 
Silver Plate Co., Limited, and was supplied 
through F. A. Carpenter, the enterprising 
hardware merchant of Hamilton. 



MARRIED AT LOUISVILLE. 

A pretty wedding took placeon Saturday, 
July 5, in St. John's Evangelical church, 
Louisville, Ky., when Mr. Theodore Korb, 
of L?wis Bros. & Co., Montreal, was 
married to Miss Julia Mansfield, daughter 
of Robert Mansfield, of Louisville. Miss 
Mansfield is an accomplished young woman, 
and a graduate of the Frese music school. 
Mr. Korb is well known as the advertising 
manager of Lewis Bros. & Co. The young 
couple have taken up their residence at 
425 St. Urbain street, Montreal. 



TRADE CHAT. 



The charter of the Robson Elevator Co., 
of Ayr, has been cancelled. 

Kingston has made her first shipment of 
zinc ore. On July 5, 175 tons, mined in 
North Frontenac County, were shipped to 
Montreal. 

The present dock at Collingwood is being 
lengthened to 530 feet. Several important 
alterations are being made on the water 
front. The railway track is being moved 
further south. 

The Hamilton Bridge Company has been 
given the contract for the steel work, 
trusses, etc., of The Deering Harvester 
Company's factory at Hamilton at between 
$12,000 and $13,000. 

The structural steel work of Hotel Astor 
(Muscherheims) is being protected with 
Dixon's silica -graphite paint, in colors red 
and green, This paint is manufactured by 
The Joseph Dixon Crucible Co., Jersey City, 
N.J. 

F.C. Duncan, general merchant, Estevan, 
N.W.T., has sold out to J. G. Hastings. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipmentt 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 



Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



IRON MOULDERS' CONVENTION. 

ABOUT 540 delegates, representing a 
membership of 50,000 moulders in 
the United States and Canada 
are in attendance in Toronto at the 
twenty second session of the Iron Mould- 
ers' International Union of North Amer- 
ica. 

|rThe officers of the organization are : 
President, Martin Fox; secretary. E. J. 
Denney ; assistant-secretary, John G. 
Weaver; financier, II. H. Metcalf ; editor 
of journal, David Black (formerly of To- 
ronto) ; members of the board, M. i'. 
.Murphy, dames Flanagan, M. B. Lavery, 
dames H. O'Neil. John Uecktenwald, \V . 
J. Phillips, and Geo. W. Creig. 

The convention is expected to last from 
la to 20 days. The principal business 
before the convention will hinge upon the 
reports of, 'the committee on constitution. 
which is always amended more- or less a! 
these gatheiings, and of the committees 
on petitions, claims, and grievances. 

The increase in membership during the 
last three years has been 20,000, and 
during this time 158 new charters wen' 
granted, while 31 had lapsed. 

President Fox showed that in this same 
period moulders' wages had advanced 
from 1 18 to 20 per cent., and that mould- 
ers were now enjoying' better conditions 
than they had done at any time during 
the past 25 years. His observations and 
experiences confirmed him in the belie! 
that wage agreements covering a specified 
time were desirable. They insured a 
period of peace for the prosecution of 
the work of the union and introduced an 
element of certainty into the industry 
which was of positive value to both the 
moulder and his employer. 

President Fox, in reference to agree- 
ments said in part : " 1 desire to im- 
press it deeply upon the minds of the 
assembled delegate's that no labor organ- 
ization of any standing can afford to 
wilfully violate agreements or undertak- 
ings to which it has become a party. If 
it does so, it loses materially both in 
prestige' and in the estimation of the 
public, and cannot expect to be regarded 
as a responsible party with whom to 
make agreements in the future. The only 
sale policy, the only honorable one, is to 
faithfully carry out all agreements regu- 
larly entered into, until they expire by- 
time limitation or are abrogated.'' 

President Fox thought it wiser to en- 
dorse tic nine-hour movement than to 
jump from a ten-hour to an eight hour 
system. In his opinion a reduction in 
thi' hours would be a more substantial 
gain than an equivalent advance' in 
wages. Wage advances would be subject 
to future trade fluctuations, whereas the 
shorter workday would be a permanent 
gain. 

Regarding the moulding machine, the 
president made the plain confession : 
" Our original attitude towards the ma- 
chine was a short-sighted and mistaken 
on.- and the resulting injury to our own 
interests cannot be removed by a perpe- 
tuation of the early prejudice. The 
foundry industry is developing, and our 
union must adapt its policy to the chang- 
ing conditions or fall into decay." 

In dealing with finances, the president 
recommended no change in the weekly 
^\\[r^, 25 cent :. The total income for the 
three-year term was $595,262, and tin; 
total disbursements. 8532,101, leaving a 

bala of 863,160. The receipts of the 

death and disability fund were $111,916, 
and the disbursements $75,631, leaving a 



Plain Facts. 



The following extract form a letter from Carter 
Bros., Picton, Out., tells the story in a nutshell: 

"In 1895 we were a very bad third in the paint business in Picton; 
to-day we sell more prepared paint than all the other dealers com- 
bined. 

"In 1895 we were selling a paint that could be bought in every 
little hole and corner grocery store throughout the country; to-day 
we enjoy the sole control of S.W.P. and are protected in its sale 
by the largest paint and color house in the world. 

"In 1895 we were doing business in a rut; S.W.P. woke us 
up, put new life into us, made us see what good advertising placed 
in the right manner would accomplish. We are now doing $10,000 
more business a year, and do not hesitate to say that to S.W.P. 
belongs the credit of helping us to do the greater portion of it." 

Our B-ij booklet tells how we helped Carter Bros, 
succeed. Write for copy to-day. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, T0R0NI0, KANSAS CITY 




balance of $36,285. The strike in Cleve- 
land cost the union $104,360. The total 
receipts of the strike fund were $314,763, 
and expenditures from it $327,961, creat- 
ine a deficit of $13,198 



WATERBURY BRASS COMPANY. 

THI'" Waterbury Brass Co., whose 
general offices, mills and factories 
an' at Waterbury, Conn., and 
stores at New York City and Providence, 
R.I., is one of the most progressive com- 
panies in the United States. They were 
organized in Is 15 and received a special 
charter in 1881. Their New York ware- 
house was established in 1846, Owing to 
increased busine s, they have recently 
opened their new warehouse at 122-130 
Centre street, New York Citv, corner of 
Centre and White street;. They are carry- 
ing upwards of a million pounds of brass 
and copper in sheets, rods, wire and tub- 
ing, which is classified in a stock sheet 
senl to the trade for the asking, and 
would suggest that you get on their 
mailing list, as they issue a stock sheet 
■ nil e a month. 

It w said to be the largest stock car- 
ried in America of high brass, low brass, 
eililine'. oreide and bronze metal in rolls; 
l'i"h brass in 24 x 18 sheets, sawed and 
hoop brass, seamless drawn brass and 
Conner tnbiner. including iron pipe sizes, 
plain and nickel plated ; brazed tubing, 
brass roils and sheet copper. They are 
now carrying a complete stock of solde*"- 
ino- coppers. 

The feature of this mammoth stock- is 
immediate shipment (he same day order 
is received, and the buyer has really two 
sources of supply in trading with The 
Waterhurv Brass Co.— their \"mv York 
warehouse and their mills. They have 



their own telephone service between ware- 
bouse and mills, and their facilities in- 
dicate the best efficiency for handling- 
business. 

The Canadian buyer will no doubt have 
the same satisfactory experience as the 
buyer in the. States. The firm's motto 
is under three headings : Good goods. 
prompt attention to orders and corre- 
spondence, and in step with improve- 
ments and betterments. Their spring 
brass wire stands for the best with the 
hardware trade. Get to know them 



THE FERNIE COAL STRIKE. 

Mr. Flias Rogers, managing director of 
the Crow's Nest Mines, has denied the 
statement of The Boundary Creek Times, 
of Greenwood, B.C.. in its issue of June 
27. The Times says : " When a very 
large increase was made to the com- 
pany's coke ovens long-time contracts 
were made with Montana works to in- 
sure a full and regular market for their 
coke. These contracts must be observed 
by the coal company, with the result 
that the Boundary smelters arc unable to 
"it a supply. The Granby smelter and 
the mines at Phoenix arc compelled to 
close down on this account this week 
The Greenwood smelters are still running, 
but unless a fresh supply of coke arrives 
early in July they will be forced to fol- 
low suit." 

Mr. Rogers has issued (he following 
statement : " Since the shortage arose 
as a result of the accident, and the more 
recent strike, not a pound of coke was 
being sent to Montana, and the whole 
output was going In Canadian smelters 
They had been urged to lay in reserve 
supplies, but without success, and now 
all was being done that was possible to 
supply them." 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax. July 8, 1902. 

THE hardware trade for the last 
week ha< been good ; in fact, it 
appears to be more active com- 
paratively than the other wholesale 
lines. At the same time the volume of 
business done is not so large as during 
previous weeks, as the time for the mid- 
summer dullness has about arrived. Up 
to date the season's trade shows an in- 
crease over previous years, and appear- 
ances indicate now that this lead will be 
strongly maintained for the balance of 
the year. 

* * * 

The healthy tone of business still con- 
tinues. The dealers have nothing to 
complain of with reference to payments. 
and the reports from all parts of the 
Province are encouraging. The fact that 
good crops are now generally assured 
will have a tendency to stimulate busi- 
ness, especially in the building line, as 
the farmers feel certain that they will be 
able to pay for any outlay they may 
make — and the farmer and his crops are 
the backbone of business generally. 

* * * 

There is general complaint that the 
manufacturers are slow in filling orders 
in nearly every line of the trade. Orders 
placed six months ago are only arriving, 
and some orders have not even yet been 
filled. This is a very great inconvenience, 
as the jobbers do not usually carry 
heavy stocks, their orders largely de- 
pending on' the prevailing business being 
done. Some months it is largely in one 
line, while in others it may be another 
line altogether. The jobbers cannot 
place their orders So far ahead, and the 
wholesalers can only distribute goods as 
they are able to obtain them from the 
manufacturers. 

-X- -X- * 

As a general rule hardwaremen are not 
strong advertisers — unless they have op- 
position. This is largely the case in 
Halifax, though many firms handle spe- 
cial lines and have lor years maintained 
in these lines the bulk of the trade ; and 
they are all good advertisers. An idea 
of the business doing just now, or being 
looked for, may be gleaned from a re 
view of the local advertising running. 
1. "Wire doors, window screens, green 
wire cloth"; 2. "Paris green, galvan- 
ized and black sheet iron " ; 3. " Haying 
tools and farming implements " ; \. 

Tinware, enamelware, zinc, lead, and 
glass " ; 5. " Creamers, straining pails. 
galvanized pails " ; (i. " Paris green and 
shipping supplies " ; 7. " Builders' hard- 
ware " ; 8. " Steel and wire fencing " ; 

9. " Engines, boilers, and machinery" ; 

10. " Oils, paints, glass and putty. 
These are taken from actual advertise- 
ments before us and illustrate that all 
lines are being presented, and as " Ail- 
vei'tisjne pays," business is being done 
in each line. 

* # # 

Cordage is firm at prices last noted. 
There is an advance in the primary mar- 
ket in linseed oil, but no change has ye! 
been made in this market. All lines of 
iron ami steel are firm. There is quite a 
business still doing in builders' mate 
rials of all vinds. but orders are on a 
smaller scale than in the early part of 
the season. 

\{. C. 11. 



To Manufacture "IIONEST GOODS" 

And Sell Them at "HONEST PRICES" 



IS A GENUINE PLEASURE AND A REAL SATISFACTION. 

That's our experience in the manufacture an 3 sale of 

Iver Johnson Single duns 



« 




Seml-Hammerless. Trigger Action. Automatic Ejector, or Non-Ejector. 
Send for new Catalogue just received. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



New Vork Office : 99 Chambers St. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 



THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

. . . Successors to . . . 
The Toronto Branch of THE COPP BROS. CO., Limited. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Mantels, Grates, Tiles, etc. Coal Grates. Gas Grates. Gas Logs. 

HOT-AIR REOISTERS A SPECIALTY. 

Stove repairs for the Copp Bros', make of Stoves and Furnaces. 

New Address-76 York: St., TORONTO. 



NOTE OOO^^^^^^^^^ 
CLOSE §$»885§S^^§^^^^ 
MESH i»«»«88»£^ 


Page Acme Poultry Netting 

is close meshed at bottom and does not require rail or 
board support at edges, having strong straight wire 
(No. 12guage) at top, bottom and in centre, cannot sag 
and is easy to erect. The "Page Acme" netting is of 
neat appearance, very durable and cheap. We also 


AT §i§§§!<§§§§§§§§§§^ 


BOTTOM ^^^^^^^^^^^ 


staples. The name of Page is your guarantee of quality. 
The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited, Walkervillc, Ont, 6 


«#■ »»?W^SS?S^?l^?^Sfi^fi 





H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
' Take Down ' 
Cun Made. 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers. 

Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO,, 



NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS. 



SOLD BY ALL HARDWARE 
DEALERS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 
HARVEST TOOLS 



Limited, 

ONLY 
WHOLESALE 




"INDIAN POND" Scythe Stones. ^J "BLACK DIAMOND" Scythe Stones 

For Full Description of Other Lines See Our Hardware Catalogue. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., li«™, Toronto 

Graham Nails are -the Best:. 

Factory : Dufferln Street, Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLY 

DEPARTMENT 



UTILITY OF THE STORAGE BATTERY. 



THE storage battery or accumulator as 
it is sometimes called is coming to the 
front very rapidly, and the time is 
not very far distant when the storage bat- 
tery will be used for many purpores that 
have been thought'impracticable. It is not 
so very long ago since the storage battery 
was discovered, and, of course, it was in a 
very crude state at that time. 

A cell without a substance designed to 
absorb the hydrogen is said to polarize 
when the collecting hydrogen stops its 
action andjthe substance used to absorb the 
hydrogen is called a de-polarizer. There 
are many of those familiar with the storage 
battery who have seen that all decom- 
position cells give back transient current 
after the action is stopped. This effect was 
first studied by Ritter, and he found that 
lead plates in a solution of sulphuric acid 
gave back current for much longer time 
than other combinations. This discovery 
was no doubt the foundation of the modern 
accumulator, or storage cells. 

Plante found that by repeatedly decom- 
posing the water and taking off the current 
the plate took up more and more energy, 
and by repeating the changing and dis- 
charging and reversing the current many 
times he found plates would take up a large 
quantity of energy, and, consequently, give 
back current for a long time. He found 
that one plate, the anode, became oxidized 
into peroxide by taking up oxygen liberated 
on it by the charging current. The other 
plate became spongy, and, on discharging, 
the spongy cathode is acted upon by oxygen 
and sulphuric acid, forming sulphates and 
low oxides. On charging again, the anode 
is reoxidized and the cathode reduced again 
to pure spongy lead. 

The Plante plate, the peroxidized one, is 
still used in modern cells. Mr. Faure dis- 
covered that by pasting a mixture of oxide 
of lead and sulphuric acid on the plates, 
their capacity for energy became at once 
much greater. Later on it was found better 
to punch holes in the plates and fill them 
with the lead oxide paste, and then grids 
and corrugated plates were used, all de- 
signed to carry as much lead oxide as 
possible, in contact with the lead as a con- 
ductor. There have been many forms ot 



be necessary to use it for light or power. 
The storage battery will also be found 
useful for utilizing natural powers, such as 
small and large water powers. There are 
many small creeks running through farms 
and other properties that could in many 
cases be dammed up and converted into 
useful energy. In many cases the water 
may not be of sufficient volume to operate 
a dynamo for any great length of time and 
maintain a constant electro-motor force or 
voltage. However, all the water there is 
can be used to its full capacity charging 
accumulators for 24 hours per day. This 
stored energy can be used at will for either 
lighting or power at a constant pressure up 
to the capacity of the batteries. Many other 
natural powers may be used throughout the 
storage batteries. The wave on our lakes 
may yet be transmitted into electrical and 
mechanical energy. 

GEE ELECTRICAL CO. 

The Gee Electrical Co., Colborne street, 
report business to be brisk in all depart- 
ments. In their wiring department new 
work this week has been done for 
Thos. Horn ; Burke & Howard ; Fox 
Bras.; The McLean Co.; Mr. Saun- 
ders ; St. Mary's Church ; Dr. Mc- 
Laughlin, College street ; Mr. Hender- 
which he claims a short circuit, the buckling > son, Glen Road ; Mr. Rawlinson, Maple 

avenue; also extension of the Sunlight Soap 
Co. In their machine department they are 
extremely busy. During the week they have 
sold one 30-h.p. machine to Major Tassie ; 
one 10-h.p. to The A. R. Williams Co.; 
one 5-h.p. to H. W. Pctrie ; one 60-light 
dynamo to H. W. Petrie. They have as 
well secured contracts for work in The Con- 
federation Life Building ; for The Gowans, 
Kent Co. ; for The Larkin Tea Co. ; for the 
Collingwood Corporation ; for the G. N. 
Western Co.; Henry Barber and others. 
This company reports the outlook to be 
exceptionally bright. 

Mr. Gee has secured a first class 
mechanical engineer of 1 5 years' technical 
and practical experience in machine con- 
struction in the person of Mr. James L. 
Campbell, of Glasgow. Scotland. Mr. 
Campbell will take entire charge of the 
factory and manufacturing departments, 
thus leaving Mr. Gee to deal entirely with 
the electrical side of the business. 



grids made, and as yet it cannot be said 
that they are a success. However, there 
are some batteries on the market that have 
given fairly good results. The principal 
difficulty with the accumulator is the 
buckling of the plates, which is caused by 
unequal expansion. The electic light being 
a much better Conductor at the bottom of 
the cell than acfhe top, this constant 
buckling caused the active material or lead 
oxide to become loose in the plates, and if 
the battery is subjected to any vibration, 
these oxide pieces sometimes fall out and 
make a connection between the positive 
and negative slates of the battery. This is 
called a short circuit, and as soon as this 
occurs the curlent passing through the other 
batteries that are in circuit with it is re- 
versed, and if fuch a thing should happen 
many times the batteries would soon 
become useless 

Another drawback to the storage battery 
is its excessive Veight, especially where 
they are used for automobile work. How- 
ever, the accumulator has come to stay, and 
all their weaknesses will soon be overcome. 

Thos. L. Kay, of The Kay Electric Dy- 
namo and Motor Co., Limited, Toronto, has 
recently designed a new storage battery inx 

of plates and the falling-out of the active 
material are absolutely impossible. He also 
claims that his new battery will not weigh 
more than one half as much as any battery 
now on the market of the same capacity 
In other words, the weight of the 
will not exceed 150 lb. to the 
hour. This will bring the storagj^battery 
into direct touch with the auto 

There are many other Jnings that the 
accumulator can be ad^ntageously used 
for. For instance, in dentral stations where 
the load is irregular, smaller units of power 
can be used, thus leducing the cost of 
operation. For the lighting and furnishing 
the power on a farm rme dynamo can be 
attached to a windmill, \nd when there is 
enough wind to causeAbe windmill to 
revolve the dynamo will w set in motion 
and will start immediately to generate 
currents of electricity which will be taken 
in by the storage batteries or accumulutors 
and held there until such time as it may 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



WANTED-- 



AN AGENT 
TO SELL 



Stooks, Dies and Taps and other En- 
gineers' Hand Tools and Platelayers' 
Tools to Hardware Factors, Kailroad 
Companies and Mines, on a commission 
basis. Apply, 

Fasterbrook, Allcard & CO., 

LIMITED. 
SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 



WOOD WORKING. 

No. 14771— Small Wood Turning Lathe. 

No. 14324— 17-in. x 18-in. Wood Turning Lathe. 

No. 16054— PODy Planer, Planes 24-in. 

No. 15859— " " ■' 12-in. 

No. 16204— 18-in. Waterous Planer and Matcher. 

No. 16125— 24-in. Planer and Matcher. 

No. 15155— 12-in. Buzz Planer. 

No. 118<l9-24-ln. " " . 

No. 14367— 26-in. Pedestal Band Saw. 

No. 15331— 30-in. Bracket Band Saw. 

No. 15674— Drag Saw Machine (5-ft. Drag Saw). 

IRON WORKING. 

No. 15093— 21-in. Upright Drill, Back Geared and P.F. 

No. 7819— 16-in. " " 

No. 14742— 11-in. Friction Cone Drill. 

No. 15335— 10-in. " Disk " 

FANS AND BLOWERS. 

No. 16236— No. 2 Steel Pressure Blower (Sturtevant). 
No. 12631-No. 8 " " 

Also a large assortment of Tinsmiths' Tools. 

Write for prices aid monthly list of 
anything In the machinery line. 

H. W. PETRIE, 141-145 Front St. W., Toronto 



%%&> 

Blacksmiths' 

Hand 
Drills. 

The very 
best. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 




DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 



They are easily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by any one. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 



Patented, Jul; Uth, 1893. 



Canadian Patent, June !4th. 1894. 




Sold by 
Jobbers 
of . . . 

Hardware 
Tinware 

and 

Stoves. 



EXTENDED. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
•• A. H. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 
hardware trade 



Write Us For Prices 

c 




James Warnock & Co, 



Gait, Ont. 



6. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of- 



TQti 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 



STANYON ENGINEERING CO. 



402 MCKINNON BUILDINC, 



Phone Main 2177. 



-TORONTO 

CONTRACTING AND CONSULTING ENGINEERS. 

Steel Works, all kinds of Rolling Mills, Wire Mills, etc., all built complete. Machinery designed for any purpose 
General Offices, - PITTSBURG, Pa. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York: 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. Galvanized Plain Wire. 

Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ELECTRICAL AND MACHINERY 
NOTES. 

THE Cornwall Town Council awarded 
on the 7th the contract for the new 
hydraulic pumping plant to The 
Goulds Manufacturing Co., of New York 
and Boston. The company will furnish a 
pump with a capacity of 500,000 gals, per 
day and a Jenckes water-wheel set up for 
27,490. Williams & Fallow, of Cornwall, 
obtained the contract for the masonry for 
52,671. 

A 38 x 32 in. 8-ft iron planer was delivered 
to The Gee Electrical Engineering Co., 
Colborne street, Toronto, by H. W. Petrie, 
141-5 Front street west, Toronto. 

A No. 3 Jewel automatic engine has been 
installed in the plant of Hoffman & Gate- 
man, brewers, Berlin, Ont., by H. W. 
Petrie, 141-5 Front street west, Toronto, 

C. L. Vickery, proprietor of a lumber 
and planing mill at Port Perry, Ont.. has 
purchased a No. 6 Jewel automatic engine 
of H. W. Petrie, 141-5 Front street west, 
Toronto. 

It is understood that the Grand Valley 
Electric Railway, which is now building a 
road to Paris, has purchased the Brantford 
Street Railway and will run it in conjunc- 
tion with their road to Paris. 

Breck & Halliday, Kingston, have placed 
a new electrical plant, engines and gener- 
ator, in the summer residence of W. H. 
Nichol at the foot of Howe Island. The 
firm has received the contract for wiring 
and placing electrical fixtures in Mr. Bat- 
terman's summer home below Gananoque. 

Jones & Moore, Adelaide street, west, 
Toronto, have closed the following con- 
tracts during the week : One motor to Mr. 
L. Allcocks, Sault Ste. Marie ; a plating 
dynamo to The A. R. Williams Company ; 
one 10 h.p. motor to The A. R. Williams 
Company; one 150 light dynamo to The 
Oshawa Tannery ; one motor to Mr. T. 
Tunstead., Toronto ; one motor to The 
Toronto Roller Bearing Co. Besides, The 
Jones & Moore Company have taken con- 
tracts for the electrical fixtures for 10 
dwellings and two warehouses. 

The following orders have recently been 
filled by M. Beatty & Sons, of Welland, 
Ont.: One hoisting engine, B. H. Appleby, 
St. John, N.B.; one special erecting engine, 
Canadian Bridge Co., Walkerville ; two 
hoisting engines, two swingers, two sets 
derrick irons, North Shore Power, Rail and 
Navigation Co., Levis, Que.; one one-yard 
clam derrick, with steel frame and boom, 
to Sun Portland Cement Co., Owen Sound; 
two additional drums for hoisting engines, 
Yukon Sawmill Co., Dawson ; duplicate 
of above, by express, Yukon Sawmill Co., 



Dawson ; two hoisting engines, Armstrong, 
Morrison & Balfour, Vancouver ; two hoist- 
ing engines and one centrifugal sand pump 
with direct connected engine, Armstrong, 
Morrison & Balfour, Vancouver ; two hoist- 
ing engines with swinging attachments, two 
clam buckets, Armstrong, Morrison & 
Balfour, Vancouver ; one hoisting engine, 
Capt. W. H. Soule, Vancouver ; one 
double-drum h.p. hoister, Mt. Johnson 
Quarries Co., St. Gregorie, Que.; three 
swinging drum attachments, Dawson & 
Riley, Niugara Falls, Ont.; one hoisting 
engine, Dawson & Riley, Niagara Falls, 
Gnt. ; one swinging drum attachment, 
M. P. Davis, Quebec. 

A 375- FOOT CARRIER. 

The Collingwood Dry Dock Co. has 
secured a contract for the construction of a 
huge carrier about 375 feet long from 
Hagarty & Co., Toronto. This company 
has also taken off The Bertram Shipbuild- 
ing Co.'s hands the contract for a large 
freighter for The Play fair Co., of Midland. 
Both these vessels will be completed by 
June 1 next. 

TWO NEW TURBINE WHEELS. 

H. A. Connell, of Woodstock, N.B., is 
placing a turbine wheel in position at the 
Davis Mill property. The wheel will give 
him 150 horse-power, and another one 
under way will give him 250 additional 
horse power. With a dynamo run by water 
and placed below the grist mill, Mr. Connell 
will supply power to his foundry and run his 
large electric lighting system. Mr. Con- 
nell, by the use of the water power of the 
Meduxnakeag, will effect a saving in fuel of 
over $3,000 per year. 

DEVELOPING MORE POWER. 

Mr. J. Alex. Culverwell, of Peterboro', 
has purchased the greater portion of a 
survey at Healey's Falls, also half of the 
Crow Bay Falls adjoining the corporation of 
Campbellford. These two powers have a 
minimum power development in a dry 
season of some 15,000 horse-power. Mr. 
Culverwell, who is managing-director of the 
Central Ontario Power Company, owning 
Burleigh Falls, also purchased a couple of 
months ago the Buckhorn Falls, both being 
within 20 miles of Peterboro'. He states 
he has arranged a deal in New York to 
complete the development of the last two 
properties. 

A HANDSOME STEAM LAUNCH. 

Watson & Rutherford, Simcoe, Ont., 
made their first run on their trim little 
launch the "Vera," July 4, with Commo- 
dore Ellis in command. The boat is replete 
with all modern improvements. She is a 
staunch craft, strong and seaworthy, with 



graceful lines and answers her machinery 
like a thing of life. She has accommoda- 
tion for 16 passengers. Mr. Rutherford, 
who is only a young man 21 years of age, 
is responsible for the perfect working of the 
boat which was constructed under his super- 
vision. The boiler is an original idea of 
his own, and the mechanical work was dc#e 
by himself. 

MORE HORSE-POWER AT NIAGARA. 

THE manufacturing world that centres 
at Niagara will ultimately have for 
its use 400,000 more horse-power. 
The Ontario Power Company, of which 
John J. Albright, of Buffalo, is president, is 
the company that will develop this power. 
Briefly, the Ontario Company has obtained 
from the Queen Victoria Niagara Falls Park 
Commissioners rights and privileges which 
enable the company to develop 400,000 
horse-power. That is a doubling of the 
capacity of the company. 

The most important part of the new right 
allows the company to tap the Niagara at 
the Dufferin Islands. Water sufficient to 
develop 200,000 horse-power can be got by 
the company at the point. By a short 
tunnel through the hill, which is made by 
the old bank of the Niagara, and a canal 
through the Canadian park, an easy and 
cheap means of developing power is at 
hand. 

An immense pipe lying close to the sur- 
face of the ground, instead of an open 
canal, will be used to carray the water 
through the park. 

It is known that a contract for the install- 
ment of machinery to develop 50.000 horse- 
power has been let, and also, as an earnest 
of the company's ability to fulfil its part of 
the contract, that $30,000 was paid to the 
park commissioners on June 28 to bind the 
bargain. That $30,000 represents the 
rental due to the park for two years' 
development of 10,000 horse-power. The 
fact that new rights have been acquired and 
two years' rental has been paid in advance, 
means that the Ontario Power Company is 
now successfully financed. 

TO BUILD LOCOMOTIVES AND 
MACHINERY. 

To engage in and carry on the work and 
business of a foundry, machine shop, boat 
and bridge-building establishment, and to 
manufacture, construct, and deal in gener- 
ally, tools, machines, vessels, conveyances, 
including locomotive engines, railway cars, 
vessels of all sizes and descriptions am! all 
parts of the same, has The Locomotive and 
Machine Co., of Montreal, Limited, been 
incorporated. The capital stock of this 
concern is $1,000,000, which is divided 
into 10,000 shares of $100 each. The 
incorporators are as follows : Michael John 
Haney, contractor, Toronto ; James Thomas 
Davis, contractor, Montreal ; Michael Con- 
nolly, contractor, Quebec ; George Patrick 
Brophy, civil engineer, Ottawa, and Roger 
Miller, contractor, Ingersoll, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 19 



Next wcekS issue 



will be a Special Number dealing with 



u Stoves and 



Heaters " 



We expect to furnish readers with 80 or 100 pages of matter 
about Stoves, Heaters and Furnaces — illustrating and describing 
all that is new this season. 

Manufacturers, Wholesalers and Jobbers who have a business 
story to tell of Stoves, Furnaces, Stove Parts, Stove Furniture, 
Stove Polish, Pipes or any other accessories are welcome to use 
this issue for their advertising. 

Dealers will want details about certain lines which the manu- 
facturers alone can give them, and for a straight talk to interested 
people, the " Stove and Heating " Number is right in line. 

Rates for space gladly furnished. Copy cannot be taken after 
July 16. 

Hardware and Metal 

Montreal and Toronto 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE UTILIZATION OF WASTE. 



By H. D. O. 



tt 



w 



t ASTE not, want not." is out of 
date. Too negative. More 
modern, more positive is the 
adage, " Convert wastes, grow rich." The 
transformation of energy and power with a 
minimum of loss is the wide-awake business 
man's desideratum. 

Far-reaching methods utilize each by- 
product. Not yet, however, has been 
reached the highest degree of attainment in 
the profitable employment of wastes in 
manufacture. The Census Bureau of the 
United States of June 17 predicts further 
development even to the extent of converting 
by-products into the main products of an 
industry. In the United States from $3,- 
000,000 to $4. 000,000 worth of wool fatand 
potash are run down the streams. A Cana- 
dian firm is erecting a six-storey building 
out of the proceeds obtained from the utili- 
zation of wastes on a contract for the South- 
African War. 

Among the benefactors of mankind, 
prominent places may be claimed for those 
who utilize what is or has been considered a 
waste. A man or woman who reclaims 
what is unused, converts to good purposes 
that which is unproductive or brings value 
to that which is esteemed worthless, benefits 
mankind and adds to the material wealth of 
the world. 

What is the waste or refuse of one 
industry may be and often is the raw 
material of another, but the extent to which 
such waste can be used is influenced by 
local conditions. It is comparatively easy 
to point out waste in nearly every process of 
manufacture, in our homes and in our 
methods of living, but to correct this is, in 
many cases, impracticable. 

We recognize how great the waste is in 
all departments of industries, and few recog- 
nize how much is being done towards util- 
izing this refuse material. But with all that 
is accomplished there is a wide field to be 
covered before we reach the Utopian con- 
dition where a useful purpose is found for 
all that is now waste or considered as such. 
The many scavengers who extract value 
from the proceeds of the city dump heap in 
waste paper, rags, old leather, coal, bottles 
or old metal probably represent the most 
popular notion of the utilization of waste 
products, a utilization more important than 
is ordinarily appreciated, and representing 
gross money value which would appear 
fabulous. The army engaged in this 
reclamation is large and its scouts appear at 
every dump, upon the scene of every fire 
before the embers are cooled, or assail our 



homes to collect whatever of apparent value 
may be obtained. 

The refuse from a city of 50,000 inhabi- 
tants possesses sufficient commercial value 
for the municipality to derive revenue from 
the sale of the privilege of collecting it. The 
fact that old rags and paper enter into 
the production of other paper ; that scrap 
iron and other metals are transformed by 
the cupola or furnace into new forms ; 
that leather scraps are useful in chemical 
manufacture and apparently cover the ex- 
tent of popular knowledge, unless the legend 
is accepted that old paper, tin cans and 
bottles are the most nutritious food for 
goats. 

In a large button works in Connecticut 
90 tons of buttons were made in one month. 
It is impossible to suggest the number of 
buttons represented by 90 tons, or to 
imagine the multitude of stitches required 
to fasten them to clothing, or even to guess 
at the number of "swears" which were 
encouraged by the failure of individual but- 
tons to maintain their responsibility. The 
material used to produce those buttons 
was the remnants of the sheets of tinplates 
from which the buttons and caps of- cans 
for blacking and other boxes had been cut. 
After the button blanks had been punched 
from this tinplate, the small triangle of 
metals connected by iron threads was 
compressed in a form under a drop-ham- 
mer and subsequently shipped away to be 
made into sash- weights. 

Some of the prominent utilizations of 
waste products that are well-known to-day 
are in connection with the fuel supply. In 
the production of charcoal from wood there 
are large volumes of acetic vapors which 
when condensed are of considerable value. 
By charring the wood in ovens or retorts 
and conveying the vapors to condensers and 
stills, the products are charcoal, pyroligne- 
ous acid, tar and uncondensable gases of 
considerable thermic value. These goods 
are used as fuel, the tar is merchantable and 
from the pyroligneous acid methyl alcohol, 
acetic acid and various commercial acetates 
are produced. 

Throughout the cotton belt of the United 
States numerous mills are operated which 
convert the cotton seed formerly left in piles 
to rot or to be burned when sufficiently dry 
into oil and food for cattle. What was 
garbage in i860 was a fertilizer in 1870, was 
cattle food in 1880, and table food and 
many things else in 1890. 

In the iron industry there are are numer- 
ous applications in utilizing waste or refuse, 
including the production of cement, mineral 



wool, paving blocks, or monolithic paving 
from blast furnace cinders ; the remelting or 
converting the unmerchantable masses of 
metal, ladle sculls, crop ends, shearings, 
punchings, filings, etc. ; the utilization of 
blast furnace gas to heat air, produce steam, 
etc. ; the restoring of the exterior heat of an 
ingot by means of a soaking pot and ■ e 
sinking of scrap in forges and furnaces ; the 
almost universal generation of steam by 
waste heat, etc., in mills, etc. 

Instances of utilization might be multi- 
plied, but those mentioned may suggest 
various means employed in special indus- 
tries to convert to a useful purpose what 
was refuse. The admission that in the 
steam-engine only a modicum of the calorific 
energy stored in the fuel is used shows that 
a wide field is still before us in reducing 
waste. The water-powers which are being 
utilized demonstrate how great is the power 
which has been permitted to go to waste, 
and which, in many cases, may be 
conserved. Enough has been said to sug- 
gest how numerous are the utilizations of 
refuse and how many are the opportunities 
for future advances. That there is a use 
for everything we all admit. That practical 
use can be made of everything will depend 
largely upon local conditions. But it is 
evident that the industry which is able to 
obtain the greatest value from what, under 
normal circumstances, is wasted, nearly 
approaches the ideal. 

This brief statement of what is being 
done to-day with articles that were going to 
waste a generation ago must lead industrial 
men to ask : ' ' Are there not other waste 
products that will be used a generation 
hence?" and thus not only increase the 
comfort of living, but also decrease the 
expense. 

NEXT! 

Mr. B. S. Leak and Mr. W. R. Tait, 
both representatives of Lewis Bros & Co., 
in the northern territory, have just returned 
from their wedding trips. This makes 
three of Lewis Bros', men who have joined 
the ranks of the benedicts within a week or 
two. Next ? 

NAILS 

Right Prices 

QuicK Shipments 

Quality Guaranteed 

Also 

STAPLES 

Write, Telegraph or Telephone 

Page "Wire Fence Co. 

Limited 

Walkerville, Ontario 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 
LONDON, ONT. 



Our stock of goods for the spring trade is 
now complete, and we can fill all orders promptly 
on the following lines : 

Wire, Nails, Cordage, Window 
Glass, White Lead, Paints, Whit- 
ing, Churns, Linseed Oil, Spades 
and Shovels, Screen Doors, Wove 
Wire, Poultry /Setting, Builders' 
Hardware, Guns and Sporting 
Goods, Finest stock in the 
Province of Cutlery. 

Prompt Shipment. Prices Right. 



DOMINION 

Wire Manufacturing Company, Limited 



Head Office 

MONTREAL 

Que. 



Annealed, 

Oiled and Annealed, 

Bright, 

Bright Spring, 

Coppered, 

Coppered Spring, 

Brass, Brass Spring, 

Copper, Tinned and 

Galvanized WIRES. 




Branch Office 

| TORONTO 

Ont. 



Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws. 
Jack Chain. 
Cotter Pins. 
Bright Wire Goods. 
Door Pulls. 
" Crescent " 
Coat and Hat Hooks 
Tinned Bottling 
Wires. 



Fence, Poultry Netting, Bed and Blind Staples. 

COPPER AND GALVANIZED WIRE 

For Telegraph and Telephone Lines. 




WE SHALL BE PLEASED TO ANSWER ALL ENQUIRIES. 



RAIMES & CO., 164 DUANE ST., NEW YORK CITY. 



RICHARD JOHNSON, CL/\PH/\M & MORRIS, Ld„ Manchester 



Cable Address — "Metallicus," Manchester. 
Codes Used— ABC, AI, Liebers 
and Private Code. 

Manufacturers and 

GALV'D SHEETS 
GALV'D CANADAS 
BLACK SHEET IRON 
BLACK CANADAS 
Range & Furnace SHEETS 

MONTREAL OFFICE: 

Messrs. Copland & Co., 
Imperial Buildings. 




WAREHOUSE LEVER STREET 



and LIVERPOOL, ENG. 

Metal Merchants 

TINPLATES, TERNES 
TINNED SHEETS 
PIG TIN, PIG LEAD 
WIRE NETTING 
GALV'D BARB WIRE 



HALIFAX OFFICE: 

Messrs. Grant, Oxley & Co., 
68 Bedford Row. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal. July 11, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

MUCH improvement is to be noted 
in the market this week. Job- 
bers report a material increase 
in the number <>!' orders and a brisk 
trade generally. The advance cards of 
nearly all tne American travellers who 
come to this market have been received, 
and these visitors are expected during 
the coming week. There is a good de- 
mand for scythes, hay forks and all har- 
vest tools. Plaster of paris has been 
advanced and is now quoted at 60c. per 
barrel. Manufacturers have also reduced 
the discount on standard scales, it being 
now only -10 per cent, instead of 45 per 
eenl. as formerly. An advance is also 
reported in malleable pound fittings, in- 
cluding tees, couplings, elbows and caps, 
and the discount is now '23 3-10 per eenl. 
instead of 29 per cent. Copper rivets 
and burrs, assorted, are now discounted 
at 45 per cent, off only, instead of 45 
and Ml per cent. Among the rapidly 
moving lines of the week are axes, many 
large orders for which have been received. 
The hot weather has stimulated the de- 
mand for screen windows and doors, 
which are now in brisk demand. 
SCYTHES— The demand for scythes 



shows no signs of decreasing, and the 
market this week has been quite active. 
The demand was larger than the pre- 
vious week. There has been no quotable 
change and our quotations are as 
follows : Lance, No. 80, $5.50 ; third's 
('Upper. $6,50; concave, $7.50; Sibley, 
$8.50 ; Cradle scythes, cast steel, $8.50 ; 
silver steel, $9.50 ; " Harvest King," 
$10.50. Bush scythes, $6.50. 

BARB WIRE.— Business continues rather 
quiet, anil the price is unchanged from 
$3 per LOO lb. f.o.b. Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE— Trade is quiet 
this week. Quotations are as follows 
N'os. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45 ; No. 9, 
$2.80; No. 10, $3.55; No. 11, $3.65; No. 
12, $2.95 ; No. 13, $3.05 ; No. 14, $4.05 ; 
No. 15, $4.55; No. 16, $4.80; No. 17, 
$5.20 ; No. 18, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— There has 
been no change in the condition of this 
market. Business is still quiet. We quote: 
Bright iron and annealed on a base of 
$2.60 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal, To- 
ronto, Halifax, London, Hamilton and 
St. John. Net extras per 100 Ib.^ are 
as follows : Coppered wire, 60c; tinned 
wire, $2 j oiling, 10c; spring wire, $1.25 ; 
best steel wire, 75c; bright soft drawn, 
15c; special hay-baling wire, 30c 

FINE .WIRE.— The demand is still 
small and no change is reported in the 
price, The discount is 22£ per cent. 



BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.— This is* 
moving slowly. Discount. 60 per cent. 9 

FENCE STAPLES— A slight improve- 
ment is noted in the demand this week, 
but business is still quiet. Bright staples 
sell for $2.90 per 100-lb. keg, and galvan- 
ized at $3.25, with an extra of 25c. for 
25 and 50-lb. packages. 

WIRE MAILS.— The inquiry for these 
keeps up fairly well and the market con 
tinues active. The price, in small lots, 
is $2.55, and in carlots, $2:50 f.o.b. 
.Montreal. London. Hamilton, Toronto, 
(lananoque. Brantford, Windsor. Out., St. 
John and Halifax. 

fairly good trade is 
In carlots the price 
small lots, $2.45 per 
keg. 

HORSE NAILS. -There is only a 
small demand for horse nails, and the 
market is still quiet. Discounts are as 
follows: "C" brand, 50 and 7-fc per cent, 
off ; " M " brand, for " Oval " and "New 
City " heads, 60 per cent, off, and for 
" New Countersunk " heads, 66 2-3 per 
cent. off. "Monarch" horse nails are also 
discounted at 66 2-3 per cent. 

HORSESHOES.— There is not much 
doing. Our quotations follow : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 
and larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.75 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4.00 ; X L 



CUT NAILS. -A 
doing in cut nails 
is $2.37^ per keg ; 



Camping and Summer Cottage Outfits. 




Every town and village has its quota of campers, 
many of whom are not familiar with the comforts of 
these articles— a little introduction will effect a great 
many sales. 

And those who know their uses will be asking 
for them. 

15 Sizes and Styles of Sheet Steel Camp Stoves 
for tenting. 

Also a complete line of small cast-iron cook stoves 
suitable for cottages. 



JUST THE ARTICLE EOR CAMP. 



Oil Stoves. Ovens. Ice Cream Freezers. 

"WE CAIN" PBOMPTLT JTILL ALL RUSH ORDERS. 

The McClary Manufacturing Oo., 



LONDON, TORONTO. MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER, AND 

"Everything for ±\r\& Tinshop" 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



ENGLISH 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 

FIRE 

BUILDING 

ENAMELLED 

SILICA 

MAGNESIA 

DRAIN 
CULVERT 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



BRICKS. 



} PIPES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPJPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

'Hf CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers or 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is r. quired ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 

"MIDLAND" 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron, 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. LledttJ 



steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, §3.(50 ; No. 1 and smaller, §3.85 ; 
leather-- weight, all sizes, $4.85 ; toe 
weight, steel shoes, all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. extra. 

SCREWS. — Business in screws is active 
at unchanged prices. The discounts are : 
Hound head bright, 82^ and 10 per cent.; 
Hat head bright, 87 ■£ and 10 per cent.; 
brass, round heads, 75 and 10 per cent.; 
brass, Hat heads, SO and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS. — A fairly good demand for 
bolts continues. Prices and discounts are 
unchanged, and our quotations are as 
follows : Norway carriage bolts, 55 per 
cent.; common, 50 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 55 per cent.; machine 
bolts, 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws, 
66 2-3 per cent.; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 and 
5 per cent.; blank bolts, 50 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 50 and 5 per cent.; 
plough bolts, 50 and 5 per cent. To any 
retailer an extra discount of 10 per cent, 
is allowed. Tire bolts, 67$ per cent. ; 
stove bolts, 67^ per cent. Nuts, square, 
3f per lb. off list; hexagon nuts, 3|c. 
per tb. off list. To all retailers an extra 
discount of \<i. per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER.— The inquiry for 
building | paper is still satisfactory, and a 
good business is being done. We quote : 
Tarred felt, $1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
readv roofing, 85c. per roll ; 3- plv, $1.10 
per roll ; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.: 
dry sheathing, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll: 
tarred fibre, 60c. per roll ; K and I X 
L, 65c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, 
$30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c. per roll. 

CORDAGE.— No further change in price 
is reported this week. Business in rope 
is not active but the demand for binder 
twine is good and stocks arc becoming 
exhausted. We quote: Manila, 15c; British 
manila. 13c; sisal, I2Jc; lathyarn, lie. 
Prices on binder twine are as follows : 
Blue Ribbon, 650 feet to the pound, 15c; 
Redcat, 600 feet to the pound, 14c ; 
Tiger, 550 feet to the pound, 13c. ; 
Standard, 500 feet to the pound, ll^c: 
sisal. 500 feet to the pound, ll-^c. Prices 
are subject to a rebate of \<s. in carload 
lots. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. -A change has 
been made in the discount of copper ri\ 
ets and burrs, assorted, and it is now 45 
per cent, instead of 15 and 10 per cent. 
Burrs alone are still discounted at 30 
and HI per cent . Trade is quiet. We quote: 
Rest iron rivets, section carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 
and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
with the usual proportion of burrs, 45 
per cent, off, and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5-lb. carton boxes, are 
quoted al 60 and 10 per cent, off list. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH.— Trade has 
much improved of late and a good busi- 
ness is doing this week. The price is 
$1.37' per 100 square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING.— The demand is 
only moderate. The discounts on Can 
adian and English netting are : 2x2 
mesh, 19 wire, 50 and 10 per cent.; 2x2 
mesh, heavier wire, 50 per cent. Can- 
adian list used. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— The market is 
active all round. The discount is 60 per 
cent. 

FIREBRICKS.— There is no change. 
Trade is quiet and prices are $16 to $22 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

HEADQUARTERS TOR 

Tinplates— all grades 
Canada Plates, Terne Plates 
Black and Tin Taggers 
Steel Sheets for all purposes 
Imitation Russia Sheets. 

Import orders for wholesale buyers only. 



509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 

THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited, 

6ALT, ONT. 

Manufacturers of 

Iron and Brass 

PUMPS 

FOR ALL SERVICES. 

FORCE PUMPS, 
LIFT PUMPS, 
CISTERN PUMPS, 
HAND OR POWER 
PUMPS 

OP ALL KINDS. 

Catalogue for the asking. 

OUR MOTTO: 'The best 
quality and right prices." 



Pig Iron 

We offer to arrive : 

No. i Eglinton 
No. i Middlesbro' 
No. 3 " 




ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

If anofactnrtri o f 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ff^S ^Elastilite 




i mrtfrtofc Ob £xi Cftiba 



I ImptMIAl VARWSrl 



"?r ~"" 1 



Varnish 



sold up to date this year than dur- 
ing any previous twelve months 
since we introduced it. "Reason ?" 
There never has been, there is not now, and we 
doubt if there ever will be a Varnish put up, 
either by domestic or foreign makers, equal to 
Elastilite for the same money. 

In tins only, from Spirits to i gallon. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



The 



Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



LIMITED 



Toronto, Ont., Canada. 



Canadian Agents for Buehne's "Red, White and Blue" Brand Steel Wool. 



Don't tell a customer you are out of "Ark Brand" 



Paint. 



See to it that you always have a supply. 

Do not wait for our travellers if you find yourself 
running short of 

"Ark Brand" 
Paint 

but write to us mentioning our traveller's name. 

You have our color cards — if not, we will send 
them on application — and you will have your orders by 
mail filled promptly. 

Write to-day and arrange for the agency for your 



town. 



<*' 



FRANCIS-FROST C 



o. 

Limited 



TORONTO. 
Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



per 1.000 for English, and 317 to $22 per 
1,000 for Scotch. 

CEMENT. — Trade is quiet, and our 
quotations are : Canadian cement, 
$1.90 to $2.25 ; German, $2.20 to $2.30 ; 
English, $2.15 to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 
to $1.95 per bbl. ex-wharf, and Amer- 
ican, $2.10 to $2.20 ex-cars. 
METALS. 

The market in most lines is active. 
Black sheets have been advanced by 
some dealers by 10c. The prices on coil 
chain arc also q noted considerably 
higher by one or two dealers. 

PIG I HON.— Big iron deliveries are fall- 
ing behind further and further. Canadian 
makers are reported to be working on 
orders for the second quarter of next 
year. The price of Canadian is $18.50 
to $19, and of Summerlee, $21.50 to $22. 

BAR IRON.— This is in good demand 
still. Horseshoe iron is quoted at $2.20 
and merchants' bar at $2. 

BLACK SHEETS.— The market is not, 
active, but prices are well maintained 
and an advance of 10c. is quoted by 
some houses. We quote : 28 gauge, $2.65 : 
26 gauge, $2.60 ; 20 to 24 gauge, $2.50, 
and 8 to 20 gauge, $2.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON.— This is in only 
moderate demand, and our quotations 
are now as follows : No. 2s. Queen's 
Head, $4.40; Apollo, 10| oz., $4.40; 
Elcur de Lis, $1.15 ; Comet, $4.25 ; "Bell" 
brand, $4.30. For less than case lots 
10c. extra is charged. 

INGOT COPPEE.— Trade is quid and 
i he price is 14c. 

INGOT TIN.— The market is steady un- 
dei a fair demand. Straits is worth 
::.:.'.e. 



PIG LEAD. — Business is quiet. The 
price remains at $3.25. 

LEAD PIPE.— A fair trade is doing. 
Composition and waste sell at 8c. and 
ordinary at 7c. The discount is 374 per 
cent. 

IRON PIPE. — The demand for iron pipe 
keeps up well. Our quotations are as 
follows : Black pipe, £, $3 ; £, $2.40 ; g, 
$2.65; 4, $3; f, $3.70; 1-in., $5.25; l{, 
$7.40 ; 14, $8.90 ; 2-in., $12.40. Galvan- 
ized, i, $3.20 ; f, $3.45 ; 4, $4 ; f , $5.05 ; 
1-in., $7.25 ; 1|, $10.10 ; 14, $12.15 ; 2-in., 
$16.70. Extra heavy pipe, plain ends, 
are quoted, per 100 ft., as follows: Black, 
h, $4.35 ; f, $5.30 ; 1-in., $7.60 ; H, $10.- 
60; 14, $12.70; 2-in., $17.45. Galvanized, 
4, $5.35 ; J, $6.70 ; 1-in., $9.60 ; 1±, $13.- 
30; 14, $15.95; 2-in., $21.75. For 
threads and couplings 5 per cent, is 
added. 

TINPLATES — The market is active 
and prices are unchanged. Charcoals are 
quoted at $4.75 to $5.25 per box, and 
cokes, $4.25. 

CANADA PLATES.— Trade continues 
fairly satisfactory. We now quote : 52's. 
$2.70 to $2.80 ; 60's, $2.85 to $2.90 ; 75's. 
$2.80 to $2.85 ; full polished, $3.75, and 
galvanized, $4.25 to $4.35 ; galvanized, 
60's, $1.15 to $4.55. 

STEEL.— There is a good demand. No 
quotable change has occurred. We quote : 
Sleighshoe, $2.10; tire. $2.20; bar, $2.05; 
spring, $2.85 ; reeled machinery, $2.75 ; 
toecalk, $2.70. 

SHEET STEEL.— Business in sheet 
steel is not active and prices are unchan- 
ged. We quote : Nos. 10 to 20, $2.50 ; 
3-16, $2.50 ; |. 5-16 and f, $2.40. 

TOOL STEEL. Trade has not been of 



a very brisk nature during the week". 
We quote as follows : Black Diamond, 
8c; Sanderson's, 8 to 12c, according to 
grade ; Jessop's, 13c; Leonard's, 7^c; 
Jonas & Colver's, 8 to 15c; " Air Hard- 
ening," 30 to 50c. 

TERNE PLATES— These are moving 
slowly, and the price remains at $7.50. 

COIL CHAIN. — The (femand is not as 
great this week as last. Prices were ad 
vanced by some firms, but others are 
quoting : No. 6, 124c; No. 5, 10£c; No. 4, 
10c; No. 3, 94c; i-inch, 7£c. per lb.; 
5-16, $5; 5-16 exact, $5.25; |, $4.25; 
7-16, $4.05; 4, $3.95; 9-16, $3.85; |, 
$3.55 ; |, $3.50 ; I, $3.45 ; 1-inch, $3.45. 
In carload lots an allowance of 10c is 
made. 

SHEET ZINC— There is not much 
doing. The price is $5.85 to $6.25. 

ANTIMONY.— We quote 10c 

ZINC SPELTER— Trade is quiet, We 
quote 5c 

.SOLDER.— A good steady demand keeps 
up for solder. Bar solder is quoted at 
L8c, and wire solder at 20c 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

A fair amount of business is being 
done, though the factories are not 4$ 
busy as they were a month ago. There 
is still a remarkably good output of 
liquid paints, and it looks as if the de- 
mand was to continue through the sum 
mcr. Dry white lead is hard to gel ai 
the corroding centres, and grinders are 
hampered by a lack of supplies which 
were contracted for last year but are 
slow in coming to hand. Varnishes are 
still strong and competition is as keen as 
ever. The extremely warm weather has 
materially increased the demand for paris 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



green, and heavy orders have been re- 
ceived from the Maritime Provinces as 
well as from some portions of Quebec. 
Painters' .supplies, in general, arc linn. 
Linseed oil and turpentine are unchanged 
in price. The demand is good, and as 
last as supplies arrive they are disposed 
of. We quote : 

WHITE LEAD— Best brands, Govern- 
i«ent standard, §5.87$ ; No. 1, $5.50 ; 
i<o. 2, $5.12$ ; No. 3, $4.75 ; No. 4, 
$■4,374 all f.o.b. Montreal. 

DRY WHITE LEAD.— $5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— Pure dry, 6*0. ; 
No. 1, 5£c; in oil, pure, 7£c; No. 1, 
6±.; No. 2, 5£c. 

PUTTY.-AVe quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
$1.90 per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 
$2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200-lb. kegs or boxes, 
$2.40 ; in tins, $2.55 to $2.65 ; in less 
than 100-lb. lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. higher, 
f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL.-Casks, 7c; 100- 
lb. kegs, 7£c; smaller quantities, 8£c. 

RED LEAD. — Genuine red lead, in casks, 
$4.50 ; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.75 ; in less 
quantities, $5.75 per 100 lb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 

LITHARGE. — Ground, casks, 5c. ; less 
quantities, 5£c; flake litharge, casks, 
$5.25 ; smalls, $5.75 per 100 ft. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, 82c; boiled, 85c 
In 5 to 9 barrels, lc less. Terms, net 
cash in 30 days. Delivered in Ontario, 
between Montreal and Oshawa, at 2c per 
gallon advance, and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE.— Single barrels, 72c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 71c Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 

SHELLAC VARNISH.— Pure white, 
$2.35 to $2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS.— $1.20 to $1.45 per 
gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— 8f to 9±c in wholesale 
lots, and £c additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL— 48 to 50c 

COD OIL— 35 to 374c. 

PARIS GREEN.— Petroleum, bbls., 
16£c. per ft.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 
100-ft. drums, 17£c; 25-ft. drums, 18c; 
1-ft. packages, 18$c; £-ft. packages, 
204c; 1-ft. tins, 19£c; £-ft. tins, 2l$c. 
f.o.h. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of de- 
livery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

No further change in prices of scrap 
materials has been reported. The market 
continues quiet and featureless in all 
lines, and our quotations are as fol- 
lows : Heavy copper and wire, 10^-c per 
ft.; light copper, 8c; heavy red brass, 
10£c; heavy yellow, 9c; light brass, 5c; 
lead, 2 to 2£c; zinc, 2£c; iron No. 1, 
wrought, $15 ; No. 2, $7 per ton ; ma- 
chinery scrap, $16 ; stove plate, $12 ; 
malleable and steel, $5 ; mixed country 
rags, 60 to 70c per 100 ft. ; old rubbers, 
rfto 6£c. per ft. 

GLASS. 

The market is quiet and the demand is 
very light. Our quotations are now 
as follows: First break. 50 ft,. $2.10; 
second, $2.20 for 50 feet ; first break, 100 
feet, $4 ; second break, $4.20 ; third 
break, $4.70 ; fourth break, $4.95. 
HIDES. 

Nothing of importance has occurred on 
this market, and the prices are unchan- 
ged. We quote : No. 1 hides. 10c; No. 2, 



Builders value the time saved 
by using EASTLAKE Shingles 



♦ 



Their Patent Telescope Side Lock, imitated 
but never yet equalled, makes them quicker 
and easier to lay than any other shingle 
in the market. 

DEALERS VALUE the perfect satisfac- 
tion of all customers who choose these relia- 
ble lightning, fire and rust-proof shingles — 
they are a line you can't afford to leave out of 
stock. Fullest particulars in our catalogue. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited, 

TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 






9c; No. 3, 8c No. 1 calfskins, 12c ; 
sheepskins, 70c; lambskins, 25c per lb. 

MONTREAL NOTES. 

Standard scales are higher and are now 
discounted at 40 per cent. 

Malleable pound fittings are higher, the 
discount now being 23 .'5-10 per cent. 

Copper rivets and burrs, assorted, have 
advanced and are now at !."> per cent. 



ONTARIO MARKETS 

Toronto, July II, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

BUSINESS in hardware keeps up 
well and the sorting-up orders in 
harvest tools are becoming quite 
heavy. The prices for rope remain as 
fixed last week. The demand for lawn 
mowers is about over, but the movement 
in guns and ammunition of all kinds is 
on the increase. Trade in building paper 
and in all lines of building material is 
heavy, and much comes possibly from 
the north. The general movement in 
both shelf and heavy hardware continues 
good and quite a few orders are being 
received for lumbermen's supplies. Many 
cross-cut saws, chains, axes, etc., are 
being sent forward. Eavetroughing is 
now just in season and a lot of it is 
going out, but there is considerable diffi- 
culty being experienced in obtaining sup- 
plies from the makers thereof. The ad- 
vent of the preserving season is causing 
activity in some lines of enamelled ware. 
BARB WIRE.— The demand for this 
line keeps fair and prices are unchanged. 
Barb wire, in carlots. is quoted at $2.65. 
and for less than carlots, $2.77$ f.o.b. 
Cleveland. From stock, Toronto, S3. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— A moderate 
business continues in this line, and our 
quotations arc as follows : Nos. 6, 7 
and 8, $3.50 to $3.85 per 100 lb., accord- 
ing to quantity ; No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15 ; 
No. 10, $3.60 to $3.95 : No. 11, $3.70 to 
$4.10 ; No. 12, $3 to $3.30 ; No. 13, $3.10 
to $3.40 ; No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50 ; No. 15, 
$4.60 to $5.50 ; No. 16, $4.85 to $5.35. 



Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. Cleveland are 
quoted at $2.52$ in less than carlots ami 
12c. less for carlots of 15 tons. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— There is a 
fair amount of trade still doing in this 
line. We quote base price : $2.60 per 
100 lb. Oiling, 10c; coppering, 60c;and tin- 
■"ning, $2 per 100 lb. extra. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Mont- 
real, with freights equalized on those 
points. 

FINE STEEL WIRE.— The prices re 
main unchanged with a fair demand. The 
discount is 22$ per cent. 

WIRE NAILS.— Thee continue mode 
rately active and unchanged. We quote 
$2.55 for less than carlots and $2.50 for 
carlots. Toronto, Hamilton. London. 
Gananoque and Montreal are the delivery 
[Joints. 

CUT NAILS.— No special trade is doing 
in these. We quote the base price at 
$2. 15 per keg, and $2.37$ for carlots. 

HORSE NAILS,— Business in horse 
nails is steady and the market is firm. 
Discounts are : " C " brand, oval head, 
50 and 7$ per cent.; on " M " brand, 50, 
10 and 5 per cent.; "Monarch," 60 2-3 
per cent. Countersunk head, 60 percent. 

HORSESHOES.— The amount of busi- 
ness in these continues fair. We quote : 
Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, $3.b0 ; snow shoes, 
$3.85 : light steel shoes, $3.70 ; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.95 ; iron shoes, No. 
I and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; light 
steel shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4.95. 

SCREWS. — The feature of this market 
is the active demand and lightness ot 
stocks in the hands of jobbers. The prices 
remain unchanged, and the discounts 
are as follows : Flat head bright. 
87$ and 10 per cent.; round head 
bright. 82$ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round head 
bronze. 65 per cent., and flat head bronze, 
70 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— The tone oi 
this market is strong and the demand 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



is larger than the supplies. The advance 
of last week in copper rivets and burrs 
ha* been maintained. The discounts 
are now as follows : Iron rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent.; iron burrs, 55 per cent.; cop- 
per rivets, with usual proportion of 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 
.'50 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS— Trade continues 
quite active, and there are freer deliveries 
from the factories. Our quotations 
are now as follows : Carriage bolts, 
common ($1.00 list), 50 per cent. ; 
carriage bolts, full square ($2.40 list), 55 
per cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3 list), 55 per cent.; machine bolts, all 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws, 
cone points, 66 2-3 per cent.; elevator 
shaft and whiffletree bolts, 50 per cent. 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS.— 
The movement in these continues about 
the same as a week ago, and prices are 
unchanged. They are: Common doors, two 
or three panel, f.o.b. factory points 
as follows : Walnut, stained, 3-inch style, 
$6.80 per dozen ; stained, yellow, $7 ; 
natural color, oil finish, $8.15 ; 4-inch 
style, 20c. extra per dozen. Windows : 
No. 0, $1.60 ; No. 1, $1.70 ; No. 2, $1.95 ; 
No. 3, $2.10 ; No. 4, $2.50 per dozen. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH.— Some sorting- 
ii|) orders keep this line active. We quote 
$I.37| per 100 square feet. 

SPADES AND SHOVELS.— Quite a 
trade is being done in these. The dis- 
count is 40 and 5 per cent. 

ROPE. — The activity in the harvest 
sizes of rope continues. The other lines 
are quiet, and the declines of last week 
have been maintained. Our quotations 
are as follows : Pure manila, 15c; Brit- 
ish manila, 13c; sisal, 12^c; lathyarn, 
single, lie, double, 11^-c; sisal bed cord, 
3-cord, 48 feet, 65c; 60 feet, 80c; 72 feet, 
05c per dozen. 

BINDER TWINE.— A few early orders 
are being received for early shipment, 
and the prices here are firm in sympathy 
with the advance recently made by large 
Western manufacturers in the United 
States, who were looking for a shortage 
in the supply of twine this season. Our 
quotations are now as follows : " Blue 
Ribbon," 650 feet, 15c; " Red Cap," 600 
feet, 14c; " Tiger," 580 feet, 13c; sisal, 
500 feet, ll£c 

HARVEST TOOLS.— These are active, 
and the sorting-up orders have increased. 
The discount is 60 per cent. 

EAVETROUGH, ETC.— Trade has im- 
proved with the advancement of the 
season and the demand now is tibout at 
ils height. Stocks on hand are light 
and jobbers are experiencing some diffi- 
culty in getting sufficiently large supplies 
from thi' manufacturers to supply their 
current wants, and our quotations 
are as follows : Eavetrough, $3.10 per 
100 square feet, for 10-inch, and conduc- 
tor pipe at $4 for 3-inch, and $5.25 for 
4-inch. 

BUILDING PAPER.— Business in this 
line has increased and a good demand is 
coming in from all pails of the country, 
principally from the north. The price-; 
are unchanged. Our quotations are as 
follows : Dry sheathing, grey or straw, 
35c per roll ; tar sheathing, grey or 
straw, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per 
roll ; tarred fibre, 60c. per roll. 

LAWN MOWERS.— The season for these 
is aboul over and business is quiet, and 
we quote the discounts as follows : oil 
per rent, on high-wheeled lawn mowers. 
■ Star " mowers. 9-in. wheels, $2.25 to 



$3 ; " Daisy " mowers, 7-in. wheels, 
$2.25 to $2.50. 

HARVEST WHIPS.— The demand for 
harvest whips is fair. 

POULTRY NETTING.— There is a mode- 
rate amount of business doing at un- 
changed prices. 

TINWARE AND ENAMELLED WARE. 
— Tinware continues active and steady, 
and the preserving season being now at 
hand is creating quite a demand for 
some lines of enamelled ware. 

SPORTING GOODS.— There has been 
an improvement in the demand for guns 
and ammunition at unchanged prices. 

CEMENT. — The market continues strong 
but there are not many sales being made 
although quite a number of inquiries arc 
being received. The buyers are holding 
oil' as their immediate wants are not 
pressing, and the manufacturers are not 
particularly anxious to sell. We quote : 
Canadian Portland, $2.25 to $2.85, and 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.35 to $1.60 per 
bbl. 

MBTAL.S. 

The demand for metals from stock con- 
tinues good and although there is no 
very large buying movement, this condi- 
tion of affairs is always expected in July. 
There has been little buying on the out- 
side tin market, but latest advices tell 
of a sharp advance therein, both on the 
London and New York markets. The 
copper market outside is steady, but no 
business is being done. The pig iron mar- 
ket continues along the lines previously 
followed, and spot iron is much wanted 
but scarce. 

PIG IRON.— The market continues 
strong and the demand is good. In the 
United States there has been an urgent 
demand for pig iron, but very little is 
offering. We quote on track, Toronto 
No. L foundry, $21 and No. 2, $20.50. 

STEEL BOILER PLATES— The de- 
mand for these is still good and the mar- 
ket is strong. The outside markets show 
an inordinate demand and values are 
very strong. W'e quote $1.80 for car- 
load lots on track, Toronto. 

STEEL BEAMS.— The volume of busi- 
ness doing is fair and prices are firmly 
maintained. We quote $2.75 for steel 
beams, from stock, and $2 per 100 lb. for 
carloads on track. 

STEEL RAILS.— The quotations for 
steel rails remain unchanged at $30 per 
ton for rails for steam railways, and >?3. r > 
for rails for electric railways. 

TOOL STEEL— The values in this mar- 
ket are steadily maintained, and our 
quotation's arc as follows : "B 0" and 
"' Black Diamond," 10 to lie; Jessop's, 
Morton's and Firth's, 14c; Jonas & Col- 
ver's, 8 to 15c; ditto, " Air Hardening," 
30 to 50c; Chas. Leonard's, 8 to 9c; 
Park's " Silver," 12 to 14c; Park's 
Special, 15 to 20c 

MILD STEEL.— This is steady and un- 
changed. 

SPRING STEEL.— The demand l 'or this 
line is fairly maintained. 

BOILER TUBES.— The market for these 
is steady. 

BAR IRON.— This market is still bare 
of this product and values are held firm- 
ly. The outside market is strong and 
unchanged. Our quotations are: $1.95 to 
$2.05 base. Extras cut to length while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c. per 100 tb.: 
1 ft. and under 2 ft., I5c; under 1 ft.. 
20c; over 20 ft. by special agreement, 
according to length and size. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LlMITtl) 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL, 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR* SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



pRIESrSCLJPPER5| I 

V&^^Z^ZS/f Toile *< Hand, Electric Powcrl M 

/ARE THE BEST. 4 I 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Qbeep -Shearing Machine! . 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOX CATALOOint TO 

AM.rl.u Skeror Mfg. Co., lulu, W.H..C8A 




V 



Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



An 
Experience. 

One of the largest 
operators on the 
North Shore after 
one year's experi- 
ence of CROWN 
JEWEL AXES 
in his shanties is 
so satisfied he will 
not consider buy- 
ing any other. 



Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Hald iniand, Jr., Montreal Agent. 




CANADIAN HAR 





D METAL 



27 



EP 12 IW2 



F 
I 

u 
E 
5 



WARRANTED 



icholson File Co., 

LARGEST FILE HAKERS IN THE WORLD 

Seven Factories — manufacturing all shapes, sizes 
and cuts. 

Nicholson's Increment Cut Files and Rasps repre- 
sent a combination of skilled labor and the best 
material necessary for the production of a good article. 

The result of many years' experience. 

Prices Consistent With Quality. 

For sale by all prominent Hardware and Mill 
Supply Merchants throughout the Dominion. 

Dominion Works, - - PORT HOPE, CANADA. 



BLACK SHEETS.— The volume of 
trade in this line continues good and the 
prices are unchanged. We quote : Com- 
mon, §3.15 for 28 gauge and dead flat, 
§2.50 for 26 gauge.- 

CANADA PLATES. -There is an active 
demand for these. We quote : All chili, 
§3; half-polished, §3.10, and all bright, 
§3.75. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS.— Business in 
this line is still good. We quote in case- 
Lots, as follows : Queen's Head, §4.50 for 
28 gauge ; American, §4.40 for 29 gauge, 
Bell brand, §4.20 for 28 gauge. 

TIN. — The amount of business doing in 
tin continues large. We quote §32 to §33 
per 100 tt>. 

TINPLATES.— Business continues brisk 
at unchanged prices. We quote : Char- 
coal, §4.75 to §5 per box, and cokes, 
§4.25 per box. 

COPPER. — Ingot copper is quiet. The 
outside markets are lifeless and values 
are easy. Ingot copper is quoted at §11 
per 100 lb. and sheet copper, §22 to §23. 

BRASS. — This metal is in good de- 
mand at unchanged prices. The discount 
is IS per cent. 

PIC LEAD. — The activity in this line 
continues. The outside markets arc 
steady with a light demand. We quote 
pig lead, §3.50 to §3.75, and bar, §5. 

IKON PIPE.— There is a fair amount of 
business being done in iron pipe, and the 
market is unchanged. Quotations are per 



100 ft. 



±-in., §2.40 ; |-in., §2.65 ; £-in., 



§2.85; f-in., §3.65; 1-in., §5.20; l£-in., 
§7.35; H-in., §8.95; 2-in., §12.55; gal- 
vanized, 1-in., §7.20. Trade discount 4 
per cent. 

ZINC SPELTER.— The movement in 
this line is freer. We quote §5.50 to §6. 

ZINC SHEETS.— A steady demand for 
these continues. We quote : Cask lots, ^(i 
to §6.25, and part casks. |6.25 to 86.50. 

SOLDER.— There is a good business 
doing in solder. 

^-ANTIMONY.— There has been some im- 
provement in the demand for antimony 
during the week. Quotations remain 
steady at $19.50 per 100 lb. 

PAINTS AND O/Z-S. 

The features of this week's market are the 
declines of zc. in raw and boiled linseed oil 
and 2C. in turpentine. The drop in linseed oil 
was owing to purely local conditions, for the 
outside markets are steady and unchanged. 
The demand for oil lately has been easy, and 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 



buyers keep holding off from purchasing 
for the fall requirements. This caused the 
manufacturers to lower the prices a little, to 
create a more active business at the present 
time. In turpentine the reduction was 
owing purely to the lower tone of the 
Southern market. The stocks of that pro- 
duct on hand here are very light, and only 
small quantities of one or two barrels are 
offering, at very high prices, the figures 
which are now quoted by us being 
merely nominal. The Southern market has 
fairly steadied itself during the week, after 
a considerable decline and surplus receipts 
have been readily absorbed at current quo- 
tations, keeping the demand in pace with 
the supply. There has been only a 
moderate amount of business transacted 
in white leads ground in oil, dry colors and 
zinc whites. The activity mentioned last 
week in mixed paints continues. The glue 
market is easy this spring, but trade has 
been active. An advance in glue some 
time ago has not been maintained, and 
there is a practically unlimited supply thereof 
on the market at the present time. We 
quote as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, #5.87^; No. 1, #5.50; No. 2, 
S5.12X; No. 3, S4-75! No- 4. #4 37 l A "» 
packages of 25 lb. and upwards ; y z c. per 
lb. extra will be charged for \2y z lb. pack- 
ages ; genuine dry white lead in casks, 

$5.I2#. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5 to $5.12*4; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 
$5.50; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., $4; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., $4.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6^c. 



Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7% to 8c. 

White Zinc— Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Shingle Stain — In 5-gal. lots, 60c. to 
$1.20 per gal. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, 17c. per gal.; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting— 65c per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c. ; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 
$2.25 to $2.35 ; white, #2.35 to $2.45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, 10c. extra. 

Putty— Bladders, in bbls., $2 25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2 .40 ; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., #2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2 90. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, #1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone— Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 
per gal.; No. 1, $1.10 per gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, gyi to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to io^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil- Raw, 1 to 2 barrels, 82c. ; 
boiled, 85c. ; 3 to s barrels, raw, 81c; 
boiled, 84c ; 6 to 9 barrels, raw, 77c. ; boiled, 
82c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamilton and 
London, 2c. less. All quantities of 10 bbls. 
and over of linseed oil, sold only f.o.b. 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Guelph. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 71c; 2 to 
4 barrels, 70c, delivered. Toronto, 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 

quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 

will be added, and for 5 gallon packages, 

50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 

charged. 

GLASS. 

The demand locally is fair and stocks are 
light, the complaint being the slowness of 
the glassmakers in Europe in fillling their 
import orders.. Quotations follow : Under 
26 in., £4.45 ; 26 to 40 in., $4 65 ; 41 
to 50 in., $5.10; 51 to 60 in., $5.35 ; 
61 to 70 in., $5.75 ; 71 to 80, $6.25 ; 81 to 
85, $7 ; 86 to 90, $7.75 ; Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London. Terms, 4 months, or 3 
per cent. 30 days. Discount off pane price 
list, 33^ per cent. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

There is a moderate volume of business 
doing in this line, but the weakness of the 
copper market has somewhat quieted the 
trade in that metal. Quotations are as fol- 
lows : Heavy copper and wire, io^c. per 
lb. ; light copper, 8c. per lb. ; heavy red bras?, 
10c; heavy yellow brass, 8 to 8j£c. ; light 
brass, 5c; lead, 2^c; scrap zinc, 1% 
to 2j£c. ; iron, No. 1 wrought, $14 per 
net ton ; No. 2 wrought, $6 ; machinery 
cast scrap, $14; stove plate, $ 10; malleable 
and steel, $6 ; old rubbers, 6c. per lb., and 
country mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — The market for hides continues 
quiet and unchanged. We quote as follows: 
No. 1 green, 7J^c; No. 2 green, 6j£c; 
No. 1 green, steers, 8^c; No. 2 green, 
steers, 7j£c. ; cured, 8 to 2>%c. 

Skins — Little trade is doing in these 
and the prices are steady. We quote : 
Veal skins, 6 to 14 lb. inclusive, No. 1, 
10c; No. 2 8c ; do., 15 to 20 lb. inclusive, 
No. 1, 9c; No. 2, 7c; deacons (dairies), 
60 to 70c. each ; sheepskins, 80c. to $1 ; 
shearlings, 20:. 

Wool — The wool market is still inactive 
and weak. We quote : 13c. for fleece wool 
and 7c. per lb. for unwashed. 

Tallow — The offerings of tallow con- 
tinue light and prices are unchanged at 6% 

to 6^c. per lb. 

COAL. 

The situation is little changed from what 
it was a week ago in hard coal. Reports 
come to hand that the strike amongst the 
miners is on the point of being settled, but 
as yet nothing definite has been done to end 
the troubles, either by the men or their 
employers. The quotations on soft coal are 
nominal at $3 to #4 per ton at the inter- 
national bridges. 

PETROLEUM. 

There is a moderate volume of business 
doing with a steady market. Our quotations 
are now as follows : Pratt's Astral, 17 
to 17 %c. in bulk (barrels extra); American 



water white, 17% to 18c. in barrels ; 
Photogene, 17 to 17 %c; Sarnia water 
white, \d% to 17c. in barrels ; Sarnia prime 
white, 15 to 15 y 2 c. in barrels. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Spirits of turpentine have been reduced 
2c. per gallon. 

The decline in raw and boiled linseed 
oil is ic. per gallon. 



MANUFACTURERS' CONVENTION. 

The Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion will hold their next annual meeting in 



Halifax on August 13 and 14. As the 
membership of the association, which has 
now reached 1,000, will be representative 
of the great business interests of Canada, 
this will probably be the most important 
convention of business men ever held in 
Canada. Beside the importance of the 
questions to be discussed the trip itself oi^-rs 
one of the finest excursions on the continent. 
The secretary of the association, Mr. R. I. 
Younge, should be notified by members of 
any question or resolution which it is desir- 
able to discuss at the convention, or of any 
change desired in the constitution and by- 
laws of the association. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a woru 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



WANTED 



MANUFACTURER'S AGENT WANTED TO 
carry samples for the manufacturer of a knife- 
cleaning machine, new in Canada, but requiiing little 
introduction, box 94, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. 

(25-3) 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY, 

Montreal. 



WILLIAM ABBOTT, Agent, 

Representing Manufacturers, 

Steel Beams, Channels, Angles, etc. 
Bar Iron and Steel, Plates, Tubes, etc. 
Brass and Copper Rods, Sheets, Pipes. 

CAST STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



13 St. John Street, 



MONTREAL. 



PAINTS 



We manufac tire 
these brands : — 
LION," "PEERLESS," "OWL," 
" RAVEN," also Ready-mixed 
House and Floor 
Paints, Roof, Barn, 
Bridge and Brick 
Paints, Coach Colors. 
Varnishes, Japans, 
etc. Our prices « i 1 1 i n- 
terestyou. Write us, 
The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont. 




More Bennett's Patent 
Shelf Boxes. 




The best testimonals are 
second orders. 

"Chicoutimi, P.Q., May 24th, 1902— Please send vis 
212 more shelf boxes like the last.— Cote, Boivin 
&Co." 

Write for prices to J. S. BENNETT, TORONTO 



THE LONDON SCALE WORKS 

GEORQE M. FOX 

(Successor to John Fox ) 

Manufacturer of Railroad, tlay and 
Platform Scales. 

91 York Street, LONDON, ONT. 

Hardware Mien Sell 

Our Popular Line* 

from Catalogues and Samples. 

WE MANUFACTURE 

Office and Bank Railings, 

Wire Window Guards, Stable Fittings, 
Roof Crestine, Fencing, Etc. 

Specialties in Wire and Metal. 

Our manufactures are wanted everywhere. We 
want a hardware firm in every town to act as our 
selling agents. Write for particulars and catalogues. 



Tbe Dennis Wire and Iron Go, 



LONDON, ONT. 



BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Firms desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best possible 
terms, or who are willing to become agents for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ulars' of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 
•SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE,' 

Temple House, Tallis St., Temple Avenue, 
London, E.C. 

"Commercial Intelligence" circulates all over 
the United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 




*6uiK> fO-OAV <H^rJ, 
X ,S<*tOrVG ArJP Si/fl£. 
U/lfH A flflf^ ANP 

DO YOtf? 

rvetasemetit 
in the <!• 

ujitl bring you, 
tenders/ 'ram tht 
btst contractor*. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



'Radiant Shelby" Lamps 




GIVE 50 PER CENT. 
MORE USEFUL LIGHT 
FROM THE SAME . . 
AMOUNT OF CURRENT. 

as compared with other 
makes. The best and 
cheapest lamp manufac- 
tured. Supplied in the 
different candle-powers and 
voltages. 

Also "Baby Shelby" two- 
candle lamps, admirably 
adapted for an ALL- 
NIGHT LAMP for sick 
rooms, vestibules or where 
a small light only is re- 
quired, and at a SLIGHT 
COST PER NIGHT. 

Orders solicited from 
dealers in electrical sup- 
plies and large lighting 
stations. Write for prices. 

Ontario 
Lantern Co. 

Manufacturers. 



Walter Grose, Montreal, Sole Selling Agent 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shlngleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cable* 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

■ ■ Limited 

Wastara OnUrle Raprasantatlva- 

wh. b. stewart. MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel 94. 17 Front St. W.»t. TORONTO. 







Winning Favor in Australia 

"The engineering merchants here consider your Solid Box Blacksmiths' 
Vises superior in quality and workmanship to any they have ever handled. 
They say they are remarkably suitable, and give perfect satisfaction." 

[Extract from letter received from our Australian Agents located in Melbourne.] 



Our facilities are unexcelled for making 



Blacksmiths' and Machinists' Vises 

Modern equipment and methods, high-grade material and workmanship 
are combined in our plant, producing 



THE BEST VISES MADE 



Lamplough & MtKaughton 



CANADIAN SALES AGENTS 



19 De Bresolcs St., Montreal 
Manufactured by 



THE COLUMBIAN HARDWARE COMPANY 



CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

NEW CATALOGUE JUST ISSUED-WRITE FOR IT. 




30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



END OF THE STRIKE. 

A SETTLEMENT of the plumbers' 
strike in Toronto has been 
reached. The strike was de- 
clared on Tuesday, dune 17, the men de- 
manding a Hat rate of 37-Jc. an hour, an 
increase of from 5 to 10c. The employ- 
ers refused to consider the demand be- 
cause the men had made a binding agree- 
ment last year, which, the employers 
claimed, could not bo altered without 
breach of faith until its expiry on Janu- 
ary I, L904, and under which the wage 
rate was placed on a sliding scale from 
27 -J to 32c. an hour, according to the 
skill of the workmen. 

The disagreement was definitely settled 
on Monday, July 7 at a conference be- 
tween the grievance committees of the 
masters and of the union at \V. J. Mc- 
Gfuire's, King street west. By this set- 
tlement the men, whose wage scale ranged 
from 27-J to 32c. an hour, get an in- 
crease of 2'c. an hour on the minimum 
wage, thus bringing it up from 27- 1 to 
30c. an hour, this rate to go into eli'ect 
at once. On January 1, 1903, the men 
will receive another advance of 2-J-c. an 
hour, bringing the minimum rate to 
:!2Ac. 

Another clause which was included in 
the agreement is one by which the statu- 
tory holidays in the year are all desig- 
nated. The men have always received 
these holidays, but they have never been 
definitely allowed as such by the mas- 
ters. Easter Day has been included in 
these holidays. This last has always 
been a source of dispute between the two 
interests in the trade. 

The agreement also provides that men 
working in the country may be required 
to work ten hours a day, receiving the 
ordinary rate of pay. In the city pay 
and a half is allowed to men working 
over eight hours a day. 

The plumbers resumed work on Tues- 
day, and many of the old contracts 
which had been suspended by reason of 
the strike are now being finished. It is 
believed that the great amount of busi- 
ness to be done inclined the bosses to 
compromise despite their emphatic pro- 
testations of the last three weeks to give 
w ay. 

Although the striking plumbers were 
not allowed the full advance asked for, 
the compromise effected, may, in the 
main, be looked upon as a victory for 
the strikers. Monday's conference was 
held in good feeling on both sides. The 
men did not desire to jubilate on the re- 
sult. They think, however, that they 
have done pretty well and have been 
treated very fairly. 



in the Dominion of Canada all rights 
covered by such patents and trade marks. 
The total capital stock of this company 
is $50,000 divided into 500 shares of 
Spin. The incorporators arc Allen G. 
Ingalls, Laprairie, Quebec, advocate ; 
James C. King, manufacturer, John Mc- 
Kergow, merchant, Frederick E. Nelson, 
gentleman, William J. Giles, dentist, and 
Chas. W. Brown, manager, Montreal. 

BUILDING PERMITS IN OTTAWA. 

Building has been fairly active in 
Ottawa during the last week. Nine per- 
mits were issued, aggregating in value 
$32,650. They were : Richard Brady, re- 
pairing dwelling, Stewart street. $1,200; 
D. Skuce, brick-veneered dwelling, Maria 
street, $700; The Russell House Com- 
panv, alterations to hotel building for a 
cafe', $5,000 ; P. J. B. Belanger, four 
dwellings, Besserer street. $3,600 ; David 
MacLaren, solid brick addition to house 
and stable. Frank street, §2,000 ; Dor- 
man Schultz, alterations to dwelling, 
Creighton street, $250 ; Alfred Day, brick- 
veneered dwelling, Fourth Avenue, $1,200: 
Mrs. Annie Clarke, solid brick house, Lis- 
gar street, $3,700. The wardens of Christ 
Church Cathedral have also taken out a 
permit for a new Sunday school room, 
which will be built on lots 21 and 22 
Queen street. The building will be stone, 
65 x 78 feet, and will cost about $15,000. 
Mr. A. Garvock has the contract. 



A KINETIC HEAT CONCERN. 

To manufacture and dispose of electric 
apparatus for the development of kinetic 
heat, in connection with furnaces, loco- 
motive- and steam boilers has The kine 
tic Ileal Co., of Canada, Limited, been 
granted incorporation. This company 
lias also obtained the power to ac- 
quire any patents now existing or which 
may hereafter exist celating to kinetic 
heat or the exclusive license- to use with 



BUILDING NOTES. 

The Ogilvie Milling Co., of Manor, N. 
W. T., have just completed an elevator 
with a capacity of 40,000 bushels. 

The Brantford Starch Co., whose fac- 
tory was destroyed by fire on May 29, is 
now taking steps to rebuild. The new 
premises will consist of a wheat starch 
factory 100 x 70 feet, three storeys high. 
and a cornstarch factory 132 x 90 feet 
and three storeys high. 

Mr. David Chalmers, contractor, Owen 
Sound, (hit., has been awarded the con- 
tract for erecting the new Baptist church 
corner of Division and Murdoch streets, 
at that place. It will cost $12,207. ex- 
clusive of stained - glass windows, seats 
and gas fixtures, which, in all, will run 
the cost up to $14,000. 

BUILDING PERMITS IN TORONTO. 

During the last week the following per- 
mits were taken out in Toronto : J no. 
Harden, two-storey and attic pair of 
semi-detached brick dwellings on Spadina 
avenue, for $6,500 ; Rev. Septimus Jones, 
alterations to dwelling, brick and stone, 
L§ Prince Arthur ave., for $500 ; trustees 
of Baptist Mission for a one-storey 
roughcast mission on Christie street, for 
$1,500; J. B. Reid for two-storey brick 
addition to i dwelling at 172 Bloor street, 
tor $],200; Thos. Bryce, for pair two- 
storey semi detached brick and stone 
dwellings, 10-12 Isabella street, for $5,000-; 
• I no. Ham, for frame and stone addition, 
190 Givens street, for $220 ; Geo. Coles, 
for one-storey brick addition to bakerv. 
7'_>:', Vonee street, for $4,000; Robt. F. 
Kasson. for brick collars and fronts to 
dwellings, 20-24 Wood street, for *■_>.:,( ii i -. 



Jas. D. Young, for a two-stony and a 
half semi-detached, brick dwelling, 3SI) 
Markham street, for .s-2.-J.T:i : M. II. Fly*, 
for two-storey and attic semi-detached 
brick dwelling, 337 Markham street, for 
$2,250; V. J. German, for two pairs of 
two-storey and attic semi-detached brick 
dwellings, 57-63 Howland ave., for $18, 

000 : Geo. Marshall, for alterations to 
brick dwelling. 310 Queen street east. for 
$1,000; Salvation Army, for additional 
storey to Temple, James and Albert 
streets, for $1,000 ; William Dackwith, for 
1\ -storey brick dwelling, 37 Phoebe 
street, for $2,500 ; Humphrey and Web- 
ber, for two pairs semi-detached two 
storey brick dwelliugs, Perth ave., for 
$6,000 ; Mrs. Eliza Stump, for pair 2}, 
storey semi-detached brick dwellings, 28 
30 Orde street, for $2,800. 

GOVERNMENT OF HEAT AND AIR 
SUPPLY. 

WE hear a great deal about proper 
ventilation, and heating of 
shops, foundries and factories in 
these days, remarks an exchange. It is 
with the physical properties of air rather 
than with its chemical composition, that 
the ventilating engineer has to deal, it 
is a property of air that it expands 
about 1500th part of its volume at 32 
cleg, for each degree of increase in tem- 
perature. If, then, we take 100 cubic 
feet of air at 32 deg. F., and raise the 
temperature 50 deg. we shall have about 
110 cubic feet at 82 deg. This heated 
air, being lighter than the surrounding- 
air at 32 deg., tends to rise by the same 
law by which a cork rises from the bot- 
tom af a vessel of water. To this pro- 
perty of air we owe all ventilation, 
natural or artificial. Now, then, in giv- 
ing general directions for heating and 
ventilating your shop or foundry by 
either hot air furnaces or indirect steam. 

1 would say : '. Make your outside inlet of 
fresh air large — at least six feet square 
for each room. Admit the air through 
these inlets to, a fresh air chamber. Take 
the air to the furnace or steam coils as 
directly as possible from this chamber 
without ducts. If a furnace is used, set 
it over a pit ; at least two feet deep, and 
admit the air to this pit in such a way 
that it will pass up on all sides of the 
fireproof. If you heat by cast iron radia 
tors, do not doublediank them, and in 
any ease spread your radiators so that 
the area of air space between them may 
be equal to that of the ducts leading to 
the rooms. Make your warm air supply 
ducts large — at least five feet cross sec 
tional area or one square foot for each 
ten workmen. If you heat by steam. 
place a coil of steam pipe. 15 to A.7) 
square feet, in each ventiduct just above 
the opening for the air. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Mr. William Pulkingham, a plumber. 
till lately employed at Burrow, Stewart 
& Milne's foundry, Hamilton, was run 
over by a G.T.R. train on July 4. He 
ceased was about 111 years of age, and 
single. It is thought that he committed 
suicide through despondenry at his 
mother's death. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



WINDOW GLASS 




We have good stocks on hand, all in prime 
condition, Window Glass, Picture Glass, Double 
Glass, 26-oz., 32-oz. Rolled Glass, Ornamental 
Glass, Stained, Enamelled and Embossed Glass. 
Send us your specification for Star and other 
Glass. 



A. RAMSAY & SON EST'D 

MONTREAL 1842 



GLASS IMPORTERS 
PAINT MAKERS 



Hot Water in a "Jiffee." 




The " Acme" No. IS. 



Not necessary to 
light the range in 
kitchen. The No. 
15 "Acme" will heat 
water for the bath or 
basin instantly. It's 
the cheapest reliable 
heater on the mar- 
ket — all copper, 
polished or nickel 
plated and substan. 
tially made. Has 
safety pilot lock to 
control gas supply 
and prevent waste. 

Circular and 
|)i ices ujjon 
amplication. 



The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., 



Limited 



89-97 Adelaide St. West, TORONTO. 



A UNION FOREVER IS THE 



Jiii 

fieri 




■sPart Union 

_ BEST IN THE WORLD. C 



N THE WORLD. 

Bronze Ball Seats. 

Ground Joint. 

Malleable Iron Ends and Nut. 

JUST ASK ABOUT IT. 



THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 







Sole Canadian Agents, 



MONTREAL AND VANCOUVER. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




Single and Double Barrel Muzzle Loading Guns 
Single and Double Barrel Breech Loading Guns 
Winchester Rifles Winchester Carbines 

Marlin Rifles Stevens Rifles 

Flobert Rifles Air Rifles 



Smith & Wesson 
Hunting Coats 
Cartridge Belts 



Winchester 



REVOLVERS, 

Colts 
Vests 
Gun Covers 

CARTRIDGES. 

U.M.C. 



LOADED SHELLS. 



Iver Johnson 

Caps 

Rifle Covers 



Dominion 



Kynocks 
Fishing Tackle 
Skates 
Cattle Chains 



Winchester 
Hunting Knives 
Hockey Pucks 
Stall Chains 



U.M.C. Trap 

Dram Flasks 
Sleigh Bells 
Stall Fixtures 



Eldredge 



SEWING MACHINES. 

Monarch 



Coronna 



GAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO 



Wholesale Hardware and Metal Merchants, 



CAVERHILLS BUILDING 



MONTREAL 



CANADfAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



What do you require in the way of 

CANS ? 

We manufacture the very best quality of 

Paint and Color Cans, round and square. 
Varnish and Oil Cans. Paint Irons 

Paint Packages. Lye Tins. 

and every description of Tin or Can required by 
the trade. We shall be pleased to send you 
quotations for anything you need in our line. 



The Acme Can Works, 

OFFICE AND FACTORY : 

Ontario St. and Jeanne D'Arc Ave., 



MONTR 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL. 



AL. 

WILLIAM PRATT. 




Star Safety 
Razor. 

The original and best Safety. 
Shaves Clean Saves Tine Never Pulls 



A Marvel of Simplicity and Durability 



Beware of Imitations. 

The Three Star Safety is the only Safety 
Razor that can be adjusted to a hair's width 
by anybody to suit any face or beard by means 
of adjusting screws, fully protected from in- 
fringers by the U.S. Circuit Court. 




5,000,000 
daily 
users 
are our 
best 
adver- 
tisers. 

A Razor 
of 

merit. 

Establish- 
ed 1875. 



For sale by all leading dealers throughout Canada. 
Rock bottom prices upon application to 

KAMPFE BROS., 

INVENTORS AND MANUFACTURERS, 



8 Reade Street 



NEW YORK CITY 



TWO GOOD LINES FOR THE HOT WEATHER 



OIL STOVES. 




.; 2s m 



ICE CREAM EREEZERS. 



"LIGHTNING" 

Crank*- i, 2, 3, 4, 6, 
8, 10, 12, 14 qt. 

Fly Wheel — 14 and 20 

qt. 



Iron Bottom 
Summer Girl 

1, 2 and 3 burner. 



r»* 



Glass Bottom 
"German " 

1, 2 and 3 burner. 
Tin Bottom, " Eagle," 2 and 3 burner. 

"Blue Flame Wickless," "Standard"— All Sizes 

WE HAVE ON HAND A GOOD STOCK OF THE ABOVE LINES AT RIGHT PRICES. 

THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited 

MONTREAL. 




34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS. COMPROMISES. 

SIMARD & TREMBLY, general merch- 
ants, Copper Cliff, Ont., have assigned 
to James A. Mulligan, Sudbury, and 
their creditors meet July 1 1, 

T. Hunter, painter, Ottawa, is seeking 
an extension. 

A. Clouter, general merchant, St. Fabien, 
Que., has assigned. 

Joseph Bourque, general merchant, St. 
Gertrude, Que., has compromised. 

E. S. Sweet, general merchant, County 
Harbor, N.S., is asking for an extension. 

A demand of assignment has been made 
on The Standard Tinware Co., Montreal. 

The assets of E. G. Barnes & Co., 
bicycles, etc., Ottawa, were seized by 
bailiff. 

C. T. Bailey & Co., general merchants, 
Qu'Appelle, N.W.T., have assigned to H. 
F. Horner. 

A. Prevost & Co., general merchants, St. 
Agathe De Monts, Que., are offering to 
compromise. 

V. E. Paradis has been appointed curator 
of Leger Lemelin, general merchant, St. 
Raphael, Que. 

Two demands of assignment have been 
made on W. P. Scott, painter and decor- 
ator, Montreal. 

A. Curtis & Son, general merchants, 
Macdonald, Man., have been granted a 
partial extension. 

Lucas & Co., harness makers, Port Perry, 
Ont., have assigned to James Lucas, and 
their creditors meet on July 14. 

Gorman & McDonnell, general merch- 
ants, Douglas, Ont., have assigned to Robert 
C. McNab, and a meeting of creditors will 
be held on July 15. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Gingras & Cie, painters, Montreal, have 
dissolved. 

Pauli Bros., harnessmakers, Stratford, 
Ont., have dissolved ; F. Pauli continues. 

H. Colan & Co., general merchants, 
Kazubazua, Que., are dissolving partner- 
ship. 

Phillip & McAdam, agricultural imple- 
ment agents, Indian Head, N.W.T., have 
dissolved. 

H. Bolan & Co., general merchants, 
Kazubazua, Que., have dissolved ; the 
business is continued by Bell Bros. 

The Sherbrooke Iron and Metal Co., 
Sherbrooke, Que., has dissolved, and Isaac 
Smith is now registered as proprietor. 

Lemmon & Lawrenson, tinsmiths, Kings- 
ton, Ont., have admitted Matthew H. 
Claxton ; and their style now is Lemmon, 
Claxton & Lawrenson. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

Geo. Ounn, saw, shingle and planing 



miller, Warkworth, Ont., is advertising his 
business for sale. 

The stock of Jos. Poirier, general mer- 
chant, Avignan, Que., has been sold at 
68c. on the dollar. 

The assets of J. B. Donville & Co., 
general merchants, St. Stanislas de B., 
Que., have been sold. 

The stock of the estate of D. M. Kinzie, 
general merchant, Dutton, Ont., is adver- 
tised for sale by tender. 

The stock of Thomas Outlet, general 
merchant, St. Moise Station, Que., has 
been sold at 60 %c. on the dollar. 

CHANGES. 

Dini & Cozzolino, railway contractors, 
Montreal, have registered. 

G. Herschorn & Sons, scrap iron dealers, 
Montreal, have registered. 

Roy, Ulric & Co., carriagemakers, De- 
lorimer, Que., have registered. 

Robert Eady. blacksmith, Rockingham, 
Ont. , has added a general store. 

Clough & Worthen, general merchants, 
North Hatley, Que., have registered. 

Dansereau Freres, wood and coal mer- 
chants, etc., Montreal, have registered. 

John Mitchell, sawmiller.etc, River John, 
N.S., is succeeded by Mitchell & Blair. 

C. E. McConnell, general merchant, 
Elphin, Ont., has sold out to John Buttrell. 

The Killarney Trading Co.. Limited, 
Killarney, Man., has sold out to Marquis & 
McCullough. 

Erant & Weidenhammer, hardware mer- 
chants, Grand View, Man., are succeeded 
by Alliss & Weidenhammer. 

W. F. Puffer, agricultural implement 
agent, Lacombe, N. W. T., has sold his 
lumber business to J. W. Johnston. 

Shaw & Whitlam, agricultural implement 
agents and grain merchants, Morden, Man., 
have sold their elevator to C. McKay. 

FIRES. 

J. F. Alcorn & Co., sawmillers, Upper 
Brighton, N.B., were burned out ; partially 
insured. 

The shingle mill of the Metis Lumber 
Co., Limited, Price's Village, Que., was 
destroyed by fire ; there was no insurance. 



IRON FOUNDRY BURNED. 

A large irom foundry, owned by Mr. 
Pascal Amesse, at 60 Nazareth street, 
Montreal, was totally destroyed by fire on 
Saturday morning, July 5. The cause of 
the fire is not known, Mr. Amesse having 
gone over the building the evening before 
with the watchman, when nothing whatever 
that could likely cause a blaze was dis- 
covered. The total loss is estimated at 
about $10,000. The insurance is about 
#5.000. The foundry will be rebuilt 
immediately, and business resumed at the 
earliest possible time. 



PROGRESSIVE 




MEN 



are referred to page 43 of our 
catalogue — we have made and 
sold this Varnish for years, and 
it gives the best of satisfaction. 



COPAL 

HARD-DRYING 

VARNISH 



GUARANTEED FOR 

INDOOR AND OUTDOOR WORK. 



SOLE MAKERS 

THE 

CANADA 



PAINT 
COMPANY, 

Limited, 



«<? 



Note the name 

PEERLESS 
COPAL 

and beware 
of substitutes. 



Ample stocks in 
Montreal and Toronto. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



THAT OLD RUSTED STOCK 

Why don't you get it together 
and have it made like new ? 

WE REPLATE, REPOLISH 

all kinds of Metal Goods in 
Gold, Silver, Copper, Brass 
and Nickel. 

Don't put it off any longer. Get 

the old stock fixed up for your trade. 

WRITE US FOR PRICES. 

MOORE & ORR, "SS. 

81 Adelaide St. W ■ ■ TORONTO. 

The Grey and Bruce Portland 
Cement Company of Shallow 
Lake, Limited, 

Manufacturers of 
"HERCULES" BRAND OF 

Portland Cement 

Unsurpassed for Sidewalks, Floors, and all 

work requiring the Highest Grade 

of Portland Cement. 

HEAD OFFICE: OWEN SOUND. 




HARNESS PREPARATIONS. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 

HARNESS DRESSING 

Recognized as 
"THE STANDARD." 

Produces a brilliant jet- 
black gloss which will not 
peel or smut and to which 
dirt will not stick. 




^tJK MIU e< 



^/?NESS SOK ? 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil. 



Frank Miller's 

Harness Soap 

Unrivaled for 
cleaning and soft- 
ening Harness 

Put up in cakes, 
pans, boxes and 
tubs. 



Preserves and softens the leather, 
thus adding life. 

The highest quality of oil on the 
market. 



flARNESSl 
OIL 



TWRANKMlLLIJCt 
NEW "YOBJti 



A paper that gives satisfaction to every 
business or professional man is 

WINDSOR 
MILLS 



This paper is superior in quality, has a 
smooth writing surface and of good color. 
Every business man should be particular to 
see that he has good quality paper for his 
correspondence. 

CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



The Qshawa Wire fence Co. 

OSHAWA, ONT. Limited 

Manufacturers of . . . 

Woven Wire Fencing, Gates, Etc. 

Also Dealers in Galvanized Fence Wire. 




Agents wanted. Send for catalogue and prices. 



The P. R. Gumming Manufacturing Co., L 



imited, 
TORONTO 



We beg to advise the trade that we have purchased a large factory 
in Clarksburg, where we are installing a complete outfit of new automatic 
machinery for the manufacture of all kinds of Enamelled ^rVood 
Turnings ; and that we have also acquired the business of The 
Dominion Skewer Co., so that we now possess facilities unequalled 
in Canada for the production of curtain poles, rings, broom handles, enamelled 
knobs and handles, skewers, flagstaffs, etc., in addition to our present lines 
of kitchen specialties, such as can openers, mincing knives, mouse traps, etc. 

Yours truly, 



v* 



The P. R. dimming Manufacturing Co., 



LIMITED, 



90 Richmond Street East. TORONTO. 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 5, 1902. 

IN all lines of hardware trade is excellent, 
jobbing houses having difficulty in 
keeping pace with orders. Money is 
a little more plentiful, and the whole tone 
of the market has improved. No changes 
in price are worthy of record for the week, 
but jobbers report a growing tendency to 
advance. Paints, oils and glass are in good 
demand and at steady prices. 

The movement in binder twine is steady, 
and it now looks as if there would be no 
reduction in price, as there has been a 
larger demand for the south than was 
anticipated. In implements, trade has 
improved, and there is a good demand for 
mowers. There has been a more continuous 
demand for ploughs this season, owing to 
the enormous amount of breaking being 
done by new settlers. Inquiry is increasing 
for threshing outfits, and very considerable 
business has been done. 

Quotations are as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 30 

Plain twist , 3 40 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 85 

n 3 90 

„ I2 3 95 

13 4 10 

»4 4 25 

■ , 15+35 

Galvanized wire, 6 to 8 gauge 400 

" 9 3 50 

10 4 °5 

" 11 4 20 

12 " 365 

x 3 3 75 

*4 4 45 

15 " 4 60 

16 4 75 

Wire nails , 30 to 60 dy , keg 3 25 

16 and 20 335 

10 3 35 

8 3 45 

b 3 5o 

4 365 

_ 3 3 9° 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch ioji 

X inch zy A 

S-16 inch 5% 

H inch 5# 

7-16 inch 5 

H to & inch 4K 

Cutnails, 3oto6ody 310 

" 20 to 40 3 15 

" 10 to 16 3 20 

:: 1 325 

3 3° 

4 3 60 

,, 3 3 75 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 3° 

No. 2 and larger 405 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 55 

No. 2 and larger 405 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 440 

No. 2 and larger 435 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel . . 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 so 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 79 

18 to 22 gauge 4 75 

24 gauge 5 00 

26gauge 5 25 

28gauge 5 50 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26gauge 800 

28gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 11 00 

IX 13 00 

IXX 15 00 

Ingot tin 33 



Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb » 7 00 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch.... 50 an 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger 813 50 

H 14 00 

" K and 5-16 1420 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 17 00 

H 17 55 

H and 5-16 1800 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping J 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts , 12 00 to 18 00 

Poultry netting, 24 in 1 35 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 % 

Round" " 82M 

Flat " brass 80 

Round" " 75 

Coach 57 % p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

" No. 12 36 

Bluestone, cask lots $5 5° 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s, g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. a 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion.C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 1800 

soft, 10 gauge 2100 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2 % p.c. 

" plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 25 J£ c. 

Prime white American 24c. 

Water white Canadian 22c. 

Prime white Canadian 21c . 



BINDER TWINE. 

Sisal and Standard f.o.b. Winnipeg $ 12 

Manila, 550 feet 13 

Manila, 600 feet 13M 

Pure Manila 15 % 

Five-ton lots yic. less per lb., and car- 
lots %c. less. 

SCRAP. 

No. 1 cast iron $13 to $14 per ton 

No. 2 " 5 to 6 " 

Wrought iron scrap 5 4 ' 

Copper (heavy) 7c. per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7&c. " 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. " 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 20. to 2)4c. " 

Zinc scrap ic. 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels 

Less than barrel lots 

Linseed oil, raw 

Boiled 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 

Eldorado engine 

Atlantic red 

Renown engine 

Black oil 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 

Harness oil 

Neatsfoot oil 

Steam refined oil 

Sperm oil 

Pure castor oil, East India 

Lubricating 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 
united inches 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 

51 to 60 " "' " 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 

kegs " 

White lead, pure per cwt. 

No. 1 " 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal . $1 .30 1 o $1 .90 



NOTES. 

The large addition to the George D. Wood 
& Co. building is making good progress. 
That of the J. H. Ashdown Co. is up to the 
third floor. 

Lawns have grown so luxuriantly this 
season that there has been a good demand 
for lawn mowers, and jobbers have had 
difficulty in supplying their orders. 



! 75 


80 


87 


90 


29 


28K 


29 K 


41 % 


20 


55 t° 74 


65 


90 


85 


2 00 


11 


10 


2 50 


2 75 


6 00 


6 50 


7 00 


2H 


2* 


6 50 


6 00 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 

New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 

Black and Galvanized 

Plain and Painted 

Flat, Corrugated and 

" V " Crimped 

Apollo Best Bloom Galvanized Sheets 

W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Planished Iron 

W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Refined Iron 

Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

68 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



37 




Bell Telephone, 


- 


Alain 208 


Merchants 


P. O. Box 839. 


3" 



ALEX. McARTHUR & CO. 



-M AN UF ACTURERS- 



2 & 3-Ply Ready Roofing, 
Building Papers, 
Sheathing and Carpet Felt, 
Coal Tar Products. 



Hanging and 
Print Paper, 

Brown and Manilla 
Wrapping. 



Paper mils : Joliette, Que. 

Felt Factory : Harbour and Logan Sts., Montreal. 

82 McGill Street, Montreal. 



-QUALITY— THE BEST— no better manufactured. 



CURRENT JVIAR^ET QUOTATIONS 



July 11, 1902 
Thesi prices are for such qualities and 

quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dei'era on the usual ttrms of credit, the 
lowest figures beiDg for larger quantities and 

prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor i* anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent error* in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accuiate. 
META.I1S. 
TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 23 lb. ingotr, 1001b. 832 00 $33 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates Bright. 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Per box. 

I.C., usual sizes S6 75 

IX. " 825 

IX.X. " 975 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

IC 675 

IX 825 

I.X.X 975 

Raven and Vulture Grades — 

I."., usual sizes 5 00 

IX. " 6 00 

IX.X. » 7 00 

IX. XX. " 8 00 

DC., 12%xl7 ,... 4 50 

DX 525 

D.X.X 6 00 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

IC, usual size, 12x20 4 25 

IX). 1 special sizes, Dase 4 75 

20x28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates Terne. 
Dean or J.G. Grade - 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

I. X, Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X.X., 14x56, 50 sheet bxs.") 

" 14x60, " V .... 06% 
" 14x65, " j 
Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 2» gauge 8 00 

" " 26 " 8 50 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb. ... 1 95 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoop steel, 1% to3 in. base 2 90 

Sleigh shoe steel, " 8 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 285 300 

T.Firth&Co.'stool steel, per lb 12% 13 

Jessop's tool steel 14 

Morton's tool steel 12% 13 

Black Diamond and "B.C." 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's tool steel 08 09 

Park's " silver " tool steel 12 14 

" "special" 15 iO 

Jonas l^yb'ver'a tool steel. . 08 15 

"air hardening'' fO 50 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

,,/,,/ . BOILER TUBES. Per foot. 

1%, 1% and 4 inch 09 

2%in 16 

3m 13 

STBBL BOILER PLATE. 

%in 2 50 2 80 

3-16 in 2 60 2 70 

•% in. aDd thicker r 2 50 2 60 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Com. D.F1. 

18gauge 2 85 3 00 

20 " 2 85 3 00 

22lo24 gauge 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 " 3 15 

COPPER WARE, 
Discount, 50 per cent. 



CANADA PLATES. 

All dul', 52 sheets 3 00 

Half-polished 3 10 

Allb'ight 3 75 

IRON PIPE. 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

% inch 2 90 

% " 2 40 

% " 2 65 

% " 2 85 

% " 3 65 

1 " 5 20 

1% " 7 35 

1% " 8 95 

2 " 12 55 

2% " 21 00 

3 " 28 00 

3% " 36 00 

4 " 43 00 

4% " 50 00 

5 " 57 00 

6 " 73 00 

Galvanized pipe— 

% inch 3 20 

% " 3 45 

% " 3 85 

% " 5 00 

1 " 7 20 

1% " 10 05 

iv5 " 1220 

2 " ... 16 85 

Discount 4 per cent. 
Malleable Fittings— Discount 35 p.c. 
Cast Iron Fittings— 

On all cast iron fitting, including plugs, 
bushings, unions and nipples, 60 p.c. dis. 
All others— discount •'0 p.c. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. 

Queen's 
G.C. Comet. * mer. Head. 

16 gauge 

18 to 24 gauge... 4 05 3 75 .... 4 05 
26 " .. 4 25 4 00 .... 4 25 

28 " . . 4 50 4 25 *4 40 4 50 

Less than case lots 10 to i5c. extra. 
*29 gauge. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb 

% " ... 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " ... 5 25 5 50 

% " ... 4 50 4 75 

7-16 " ... 4 25 4 50 

% " ... 4 20 4 50 

9-16 " ... 4 05 4 50 

% "... 4 00 4 50 

% "... 4 00 4 50 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tieoutchaioa 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 
Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

English B.S., ton lots 14 00 

Lake Superior 

Bar". 
Cut lengthi>,round,y2 to % in 23 00 15 00 
" round and square, 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

o?., Hx48 and 14x60 22 00 22 50 

Plain, 14 oz, and light, '6 o'., 

irregular sizes 22 50 23 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft, 25 to301b.each,perlb 23 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 22 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 21 

Boiler and T. K. Pitts. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 



BRASS. 

Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 percent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 3 

Tubing, base, per lb 23% 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per lb 5 50 6 00 

Domestic " 

ZINC SHEET, 

5-cwt casks 6 00 6 25 

Parte sks 6 25 6 50 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 50 3 75 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 2% lb. sq. ft, by roll 06% 

. Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 05 

Not*.— Cut sheets %c. per lb. extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 37% p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

N T«.— Cut lengths, net piice, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHOT. 
Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.: chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7 50. Dis- 
count, 22% p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Teims3p.c. cash, freights equalized. 
SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 
Discount, 60 p.c. on medium and extra 
heavy, and 55 p.c. on light soil pipe and 
fittings. 

SOLDER. Per lb. Per lb. 

Bar half-and-half, guarant'd 20 

Bar, half anil-half, commer'l 19% 

Refined 19 

Wiping 18% 

AN IIMONY. 

Cookson's.perlb 9 fO 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 5 87% 

No. 1 5 50 

No. 2 5 12% 

No.3 475 

No. 4 4 37£ 

Munro 8 Select Flake White 6 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 12% 

Brandram's B.B. Genuine 7 00" 

" No. 1 6 00 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $1 75 

Genuine, 1001b. kegs, prewt 500 

No. 1, •' 60 lb. casks, per cwt 4 25 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 50 

WHITE ZINC. 

E.tra Red Seal 06 08 

No. 1 05% 07 

No. 2 05 06 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

No. 1, casks : 5 00 

No. ), kegs 5 25 

PREPARED PAINTS. 
In %, %and 1-gall n tics. 

Pure, per gallon 1 25 

Recondqualitits, per gallon 1 iO 

Barn (in b' Is) CO 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints .... 1 40 

(Isnada Paint Cos pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearey's pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion pure I 10 
COLORS IN OIL. 
25 lb. tins, standard Quali'y. 

Venetian red, pt rib 04% 06 

Chrome yellow 12 14 

Golden ochre 08 10 

French " 06 

Marine Hack 09 

Chrome green 10 

French imperial green 12 

Signwriters' black 16 

Burnt umber 11 

" sienna 11 

Raw umber 11 

" sienna 11 



COLORS, DRY. 

Common ochre, bbls 1 20 1 30 

Yellow ochre (J. F.L.S.), bbls 2 00 

Yellow ochre (La Belle) 115 1 25 

Brusselaochie •{ 00 

Venetian red (best), bbl 1 75 2 00 

English oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American 1 xides, 1 bis 1 25 2 00 

Canadian oxides, bbls 1 25 1 75 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt sienna, pure, per lb 

" umber, " " \\ 1 10 

Raw do 09 

Drop black, pure 09 

Chrome yellow , pure .* 18 

Chrome greens, pure per lb... 09 10 

Golden ochre 04 05 

Ultramarine blue, in 18-lb. 

botes, per lb 06 18 

Fire proof mineral, per 100 lb. 1 00 

Genuine Eng. Litharge.per lb 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb 1 55 1 50 

Pure Indian red, No. 45, lb. . . 08 10 

Whiting, bbl 55 60 

English vermi lion in 30-lb. bags. 95 

PARIS GREEN. Per lb 

Petroleum, csks 16% n 18 

Arsenic kegs 17 19 

50 lb. and 100-b. drums 18% 19% 

55-lb. drums 19 20 

1-lb. packages 20 20V„ 

&£»■.. do 22 22ft 

1-lb. tins 

%ib. do ;: 

F.O.B. Toronto. Terms- 3 p.c. off 30 days 
or 4 mcs. from date of delivery 
BLUESTONE. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb. lots.'do per lb 08 

PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 90 

Bulk in U ss quan ity ............... . 2 05 

Bladders in bbls ' 2 25 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose ... .. 2 40 

Bladdeis in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12% lb. lins '..'.'. 2 65 

Bladd rs in buk or tins less than 100 lb 2 90 
VARNISHES. 
In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

C image, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

" rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 125 

No. 1 1 10 

Hard oil finish 1 65 1 75 

Light oil finish 140 1 go 

Pu an ,', ar ' ' v •'. ln 185 

Shellac, white 2 35 2 45 

" orange 2 25 2 35 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 25 1 30 

" black japan 85 120 

' No. I., 50 75 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each, 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels: Size 1, $1.20; 
si e 2, 70c: size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Wiiliams' copal varnish, assorted 
cise, from %-pts. to 1 gal. $?.50. 

CASTOR OIL. 

East India, in cases, per lb. . . 00% 10 

" small lots 10 10. 

COD OIL, ETC. 

Codoil.pergal 50 55 

Pure olive 120 

" teatsfoot 90 

GLUE 

Common 08% 09 

French medal 14 1 1% 

Cabinet sheet 13 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatii e 2' 30 

Strip 18 JO 

Coopers 19 20 

tiuttn.r 18 



38 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 




t 



<• 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

• exact mark here represented. \\ Mi U^// a 

i — — xippif i 

J JAMES HUTTON & CO., MONTREAL ,0lK , A B 8 S? 4M ^^g^ ^ 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 

B. B Caps Dom. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis 40 p. o., Amer 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 5 C and 5 p. o 

Ciitral Fire Pistol and Ride 10 P.O. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sires Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.o. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p o. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.60. 
Wads per lb 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, m 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wadB, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

eaoh, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared blaok edge grey 
oloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10% 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 0954 

Brook's, " " " ••■• 1154 

Angers. 

Gilmour'B discount 65 and 5 p.o. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, perdoz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunte-B' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Bovb' Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tnbs. 

Zino 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. offTevised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inoh rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

'* 2nd " 20 00 

Antl-Frlctlon Metal . 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

•• B " 21 

C " 1154 

Magnolia Anti-Friotion Metal, per lb 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 
Aluminum, genuine 41 

Dynamo S 22 

Special ... ••• » .i 

Aluminum, 99 p.o. pure "Syracuse . . 45 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Oongs, Sargant'a 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent 
Farm. 

Amerioan , each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross.... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list). ... 55 
" " full square ($2.40 list) 55 

" " Norway iron (#3 list).. 50 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 50 and 5 

Plough Bolts 50and5 

Blank Bolts 50 and 5 

Bolt Ends 50 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65 and 5 

Coach Screws, cone point 66% 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3%c per lb off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all Eizes, 3%c. per lb. off. 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Nuts, in 501b. lots 540. per lb extra, in less 
than 50 lb, lots, %c. extra. 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 62% per cent 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 6754 Per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 6754 percent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 3754 Per cent 

Henis.No.8. " 6 00 

Henis,No.9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Batchers' Cleavers. 



German, per doz 6 00 

Amerioan, per doz 1? 00 

Butcher Knives. 

Bailey's, per doz 60 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 lb 

Rtady roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per rol 

Ready roofing, 3-plv, not under 65 lb. 

per roll 

Carpet fdlt, per ton 

Dry sheathing, per roll, 400 aq ft 

Tar sheathing, " " " 

Dry fibre " " " 

Tarred fibre, " " " 

O.K. A I.X.L., " " " 

Resin-sized, " 

Oiled sheathing, 



600 
400 



Brass, 60 per oent. 
Nickel, 55 per oent. 



Bells. 

Hand 



R-of coating, in barrels, per gal 

" small packages 

Refioed tar, per barrel 

Coal tar, " 

<\i.il tar, less than barrels, per gal... 
Roofing pit. h, per 100 lb 

Bnll Rings. 

Copper, $2.00 for 254 in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 



11 00 

20 00 



1 70 
8) 

1 10 

45 00 
35 
45 
5J 
60 
65 
40 
1 10 
70 
17 
25 
4 50 
4 00 
15 
85 



Bntts. 

Wrought Brass net revised list. 

Oast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 254 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 5754 percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 5754 per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 8 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 1 90 2 75 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

Canadian hydraulio 125 150 

Arrow 2 25 

Buffalo 2 00 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump , per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels . 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent . 
Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. ft W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 

Revolving Churns, metal frames — No. 0, $8— 

No. 1, 88.50— No. 2, 89.00-No. 3, $10.00- 

No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 

wood frames — 20c. each less than above. 

Discounts : Delivered from factories, 56 

p.c. ; from stook in Montreal, 54 p.c. 

Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash In 30 days 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. $9 60 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Teu. SyphonWashout 6 00 
Emb. Elgin orTeu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

FittingB 125 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonio, plain 9 60 
" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Ont. Sy. Jet, plain 11 70 

' " emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins P.O., 14 in 70 

" oval 17 x 14 in 150 

" 19x15 in ... 2 25 

Compasses .Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 6254 to 65 per cent. 
Conductor Pipe. 
Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch, per 100 feet 3 00 

3 4 00 

4 ' 5 25 

5 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 

Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian ,dis. 25 to 3354 Per oent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. k D.,No. 3, per pair 1754 

" 5, ,r 2254 

" 6, " 15 

Boynto pattern " 20 

Ooor Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per oent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 3754 to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per oent. 

Fancets. 

Common, cork-lined, die. 35 per oent. 



EAVE TROUGH. 

10-inch, per 100 ft S3 10 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) per doz. 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 20 

7-inch 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per doz. extra. 

E8CUTOHEONS. 
Discount, 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CAN8. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 " 

Kearney 4 Foot 70 " 10 " 

Ditston's 70 " 10 " 

American 70 " lo " 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 " 

McClellan 70 " 10 " 

Eagle 70 " 10 " 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 " 

Royal 80 " 

Globe 70 to 75 " 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 p.o. 

Jowitt'B, English liat, 25 to 2754 Per cent. 
Nicholson File Co 's "Simplicity" file handle 
per gross 85c. to 1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under 26 2 20 4 25 .... 6 25 

26to40 2 40 4 65 .... 6 75 

41to50 5 10 .... 7 50 

51to60 5 35 .... 8 50 

61to70 575 .... 9 75 

71 to 80 6 2) .... 11 00 

81to85 7 00 .... 12 55 

86to90 7 75 .. 15 00 

91to95 17 50 

96 to 100 20 50 

GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's Nob. 26 to 33, each... 165 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

,r 54 " 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 8754 4 00 

" 154 in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, —per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent Can. dis. 
25 to 27% percent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic perdoz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian perlb 07% 08)* 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb.... 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe.perdoz.net 150 3 00 

Store door, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Fork. 
O. & B. , dis. 40 per cent, rev list. 

Hoe. 
C. ft B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. iet. 
Saw. 

American, perdoz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. ■ I 

merlcan, per gross 3 15 t 75 

Hammer and Hatchet, 
anadian, 40 percent. 

OrosB-Out Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13\ 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft.run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 21 00 

Lane's O.N.T. traok, per foot 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS 
Discount, 60 per oent. 

HATCHETS 
Canadian, dis 40 to 42% per oent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



39 



Wire-Edged Ready Roofing 

The above Roofing is fast becoming the popular substitute for Shingles, because it is Durable, 
Economical and Fire-proof. We wish to supply customers through the Retail Hardware 
Merchants, and, with that object in view, we are spending thousands of dollars in advertising our goods. 
It will be your fault, not ours, if we are forced to sell direct to the user. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montreal. 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, die. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

5-ln., " .... 06'/ 4 
" " 6-in., " .... 06 

8-in., " .... 05% 
" 10-in., " .... u 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Oarden, Mortar, etc., dis. 60 p.o. 

Planter, perdoz 100 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount 45 and 5 per oent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 100 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can. dis. 
47% per oent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat. discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

.Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 
HORSE XAILS. 
"C'brand 50 and 7%p.o.off new list ) Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J head 
Countersunk, 60 per oent. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium and heavy... 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweigbt(all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Ouelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899. 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 0} 3 25 

KETTLES. 
BrasB spun, 7% p.o. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb ) 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.o. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N. P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz.... 6 00 9 00 
Shutter, porcelain, F. ft L 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobB— per doz. 93 1 01 

HAY KNIVES. 
Disoount, 63 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Colf'i.^ast, per doz 7 00 

No.o"Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined, per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 1 87 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 120 130 

LINES. 

Pish per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk ™ 1 90 7 40 

LOOKS 
Canadian, dis 40 p.o. 

Russel ft Erwin , per doz .... 3 00 3 25 
Cabinet, 
agle, dis. 30 p.o. 



Padlocks. 
English and Am. per doz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head discount 20 p.o. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, perdoz. 125 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulkingeach 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.o. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 

Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 45 $3 55 

3d 3 10 3 22 

4and5d 2 85 3 05 

6 and 7d 2 75 2 to 

8and9d 2 60 2 70 

10andl2d 2 55 2 65 

16and20d 2 50 2 60 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 45 2 55 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.50 
Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 75 p.c. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 percent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 
German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19w.g., dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
2-in. Mesh, 18 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.o. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

U.S. Navy 7 25 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oi 
can, with pump, 5 gal. 

per doz 10 00 

Zino and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.o. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs discount 45 percent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets . dis. 40 p.c. 
6, lu and 14-qt. flaring pails, dis. 40 p.o. 
Creamer cans, dis. 40 p.c. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per gross... 1 75 3 00 

Brass head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PINE TAR. 

% pint in tins, per gross 7 80 

1 " " " ... 9 60 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 40 per cejt. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian tr American 7% 
to 40 per oent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Standard Compression work, dis. 60 p.o. 
"J.M.T." Cushion work. dis. 50 p.c. 
Fuller work, dis. 65 p.c. 
6 doz. lots and ver of the above extra dis. 
10 p c. 



Lever Handle Stops and Waste, discount 

60 p o. With, in lots of 2 doz. and over, 

an extra dis. of 10 p.c. 
"J.M.T." Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis 55 p.c. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 6i p.c. 
"J.M T." Radiator Valves, dis. 55 p c. 
Standard " " dis., 65 p.c. 

Patent Quick Opening Valves, dis. 70 p.c. 
No 1 compression bath cock, rjet . . 2 00 

No. 4 2 00 

No.7, Fullers 2 50 

No. 4%, " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, per doz 15 00 

Patent Compression Cushion , bath 

cck No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, CO p.c. 
" iron " 60 p.c. 
Compel ition Globe, Angle and Check Valves 

discount, 70 p. c. 
Competition Quick Opening Radiator Valves, 

discount, 70 p.c. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 2i% per ceut. 

PDLLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 1 00 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductor's ' 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid per set 00 72 

" hollow ptr inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS. Net. 

Dominion, 30 gal 5 75 

Dominion, 35 " 6 75 

40 " 7 75 

Ronald's Galvanized, 30 gallons .... 6 50 

35 " .... 7 50 

40 " .... 8 50 

Copper, 30 gallons 10 00 

" 35 " 23 20 

" 40 " 26 40 

RAKES. 

Wood, per doz. net 110 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's.... 4 00 18 0C 

Geo. Butler ft Co. 's 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 1] 00 

King Cutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade ft Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile ft Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Bailey's 6 00 12 00 

Carbo Magnetic Razor 15 00 

Griffon Barbers' Favorite 10 75 

Griffon No. 65 13 

Griffon Safety Razors 1 50 

" Stropping Machines 13 50 

All other razors 50 p.c. off catalogue price. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and lu per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets inl-lb.cartonp, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartoos, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets with ill ual proporl ion burrs, 45 

p. c. dis. cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, 30 and p.c. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivet?, 

%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETH. 
Canadian, dip. 35 to 37% percent. 
KOPF, ETC. 

Sisal 12% 

Pure Manilla )5 

"British'' Manilla 13 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

" %inch 22 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 11 



Sisal bed cord, 48 ft per doz. t» 

60 ft " 80 

72 ft " 95 

RULES. 
Boxwood, diB. 55 and 10 p.o. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p.c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 70 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B ft A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 
Garnet (Rurton's), 5 to 10 p.c. advance on list 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. ft D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.. 35 55 
S. ft D., dis. 35 p.o. on Nos. 2 and 3 

Hack, complete, eaoh 75 2 75 

frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, l 75 2 00 

SASH CORD. 

Perlb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 
Lincoln and Whiting, per doz, ... 4 75 
Hand Sets, No. 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-cut Sats.No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

SHALES. 
Burrow, Stewart ft Miine— 

Imperial Standard, <0 per cent. 
Weigh Beams, 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, 55 per cen 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.o. 
Dominion, 55 p.o. 
Richelieu, 55 p.c. 
Warrens new Standard 40 p c. 
" Champion 55 p.c. 

SCREWDRIVERS. 

Sargent s per doz 65 100 

_ SCREWS. 

Wood, F.H,orightandsteel,87% and lOp.c. 

Wo ,^ d 5," S", di8 - 82 y« and 10 p.o 

F. H., brass dis. 80 and 10 p.o. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 

F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.c. 

BH. " 70 p.c. 
Drive Screws, 87% and 10 percent. 
Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

o 1' r, ''"■P 1 „ "* 4 25 5.00 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 
Perdoz., net 5 00 8 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co. , full nickeled, dis. 60 and 

2% p.c. 
Bailey Cutlery Japan handles, 67% p c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent 

SNAPS. 
Harness, Germac dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 450 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plair, dis., 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 25 3 5) 

Plain 2 90 3 15 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 



40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



—TO IMPORT. 



Prompt Deliveries 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BEST GLASS °' r a11 kinds, our own manufacture. Closest 



rices. 



4 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



Warerooms and Offices— 135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



STOCKS AND DIES. 

American dis. 25 p.o. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Orind,2in,40 to 200 lb.per ton .... 25 00 

under401b. " .... 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " .... 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 
5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net oash .... $4 85 
No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 & 12Va 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 15 

'■ " tinned 80 & 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only ..80 

" ^weights 60 

Swedes cue tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80&10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12% & 12% 

" brmh, blued & tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 & UVi 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails ...5!% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 



Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing I) 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

* bulk 40 

Shoe nails 60 

Clineh and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz.... 2 75 5 00 
Knglish, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 
Bailey's, dis. 25 p.c. 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.o. 
Same, H. & N,, P- S. * W., 65 p.o. 
Same, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 
Oisston's discount 10 per oent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian , per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 19 

4-ply 23 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brook's 12% 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per ceuf . 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.o. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Orescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 
No. 0-9 gauge $2 60 



10 

11 
is 

13 
14 
15 

16 



fie. extra. 
12c. 
20c. 
30 j. 
40c. 
55c. 
70c. 



Add 60c. forcopperiDg and $2 for tinning 
Extras net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c 
spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c 
best steel wire 75c, bright S' ft drawn 15c 
charcoal (extra quality) HI. 25, paoked in 
casks or oases 15c, bagging and papering 
10c, 50 and 1001b. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. 
bundles 15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 
1-lb. hanks 50c, in %-lb. hanks 75c, in %-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 22% per cent 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, «5— No. 18, $5.50-No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65 -No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9-No. 26 
$9.50-No.27, $10-No. 28, $11 No. 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13-No. 31,$14-No. 32 $15, 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil, 
ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles,15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 



Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off tte 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per oent. net oash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Galvanized Wire, per 1001b.— Nos. 6,7,8, $3 50 
to $3 85— No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No IP 
33.60 to $3.95^No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10-No' 
12, $3 to $3.30— No. 13, $3.10 to $3.4U— 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50— No. 15, $4.60 to 
$5.05-No. 16. $4.85 to $5.35. Base sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52% f.o.b. Cleveland. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17. 
$4.65; No. 18, *2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hol- 
low 6 strand, No. 17, $4.30; No. 18. $2.70 
No. 19, $2.35; No 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamil 
ton, Toronto Montreal 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 00 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77% 

in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 

WIRE CLOTH 

Painted Soreen, per 100 sq. ft., net. 1 37% 

Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 6 

White 8 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.o . 

Towers' Engineer, each 3 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. ft K.'s Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " ... 24 00 

Royal American., " .... 24 00 

Sampson " 24 00 

Terms 4 months , or 3 p. c. 30 dayB 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 





► "Pullman" 




fcs Lawn Sprinkler 


^Ww 


l&fe. IS YOUR 
1111^ ORDER IN ? 

W|$%?b Send for Folder No. 11. 

l^-'" Pullman Sash Bal. Co. 




S5 Rochester, N. Y . , U. S. A . 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 









S» T jE Y E 



OUR NEW CATALOGUE IS READY FOR 
DISTRIBUTION AND IT IS FULL OF IN- 
FORMATION VALUABLE FOR THE DEALER. 
SHALL WE NOT MAIL YOU A COPY ? 



YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT OUR ARMS. Y <>UR JOBBER HAS THEM 



J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., PO ZI * OX Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




•CKNOWLEDOED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



NEW YORK OFFICE, oo Chaab*r«St. 
NEWARK. N.J., U.S.A. 



ONTARIO 

NUT WORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Sauare and Hexagon. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

. Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
W 13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto be represented in Canada. 

"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn " 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 



Cables- 
Machinery," Newport. 



Emlyn Engineering Works, 
Newpokt, Mon., England. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

„ ., , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 




1 li 



WRIGHT'S 

Insect 
Sprayers 

PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 



•BEST ON EARTH." 



t 



Manufactured by 

E.T. WRIGHT & CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT., and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

J. H. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



OUR LARGE NEW FACTORY 



WHERE 




Shears, Scissors, 
Razors, Butcher 
Knives and other 
Cutlery are made 
by 

BAILEY CUTLERY 

CO,, Limited 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 

Write for catalogue and prices. 



CHAS. P. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 848 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and the 
controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information, no effort Is spared, ana 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify Its claim as an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, ana it 
furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Bpecinc 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its ofilces. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING. Gen. Man. Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A, FULTON. Gen. Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



li 1 
|™| 


'■■ i 


Established Cable Address, 

1832. "Bliss." 

mantjfactokeks 

Wood Turnings, Hand 

Bench and other Screws 

Mallets, Handles, Vises 

Clamps, Tool Chests 

Croquet, Lithographs 

Wood Toys, Novelties 

and also the celebrated 

Wood's Patent Car 
Gate 

For Street and Steam Rail- 
road Cars, 

The R. BLISS MFG. CO. 

Pawtucket, B.I., U.S.A. 


illlllBlllll!IIIIIHUIilllflP| 
o 




K M 


Pill 






H ' ------ mI^H; 



Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1825. 75 YEARS. 



u 



Syracuse Babbitt IVIo-te.1 



It is the 
best made. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc., always in stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Gold Street, New York. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 




Ins. ISM 



Black Diamond FileWorks 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ^^^^j***, Medals 




!! 



Awarded 

By JURORS at 

International Expositions 

Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




'%*%%%*'%'%'%%%%'%'%/%*%'%* 



PATENT INTERLOCKING 

RUBBER TILING. 

The most perfect floor covering- for Hotels, 
Cafes, Business Offices, Banks, Court Rooms, 
Churches, Hospitals, Vestibules, Halls, Billia r d 
and Smokirfg Rooms, Lavatories and Bath Roo'.s. 

NOISELESS NON-SLIPPERY 

WATERPOOF SANITARY 

Carefully selected range of soft, beautiful 
colors affording ample scope for combinations in 
harmony with surroundings. 

Write for Prices and Particulars. 



Sola Canadian Manufacturers . . , 



The Gutta Peroha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooma- 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



Factories 1 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 



CANADA. 



CASTOR OIL 



BRITISH MANUFACTURED. 



We have a full stock of 



Pharmaceutical 
First Pressure 
Second Pressure 

In Barrels and Cases. 
Prices from stock and to import on application. 

B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO. 

53 St. Sulpice Street, 

MONTREAL. 



LIMITED 



VARNISHES and JAPANS 



McCASKILL, D0U6ALL & CO. 



Manufacturers 



MONTREAL 




Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnisbes 

— Wont turn white from the effects of water and sun. 

Standard Piano, Fnrnitnre and Decorative Varnishes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and Varices 
Architectural Varnishes 



OFFICES : 

161 Summer St., 30 St. John St., 

BOSTON, Mass., USA. MONTREAL. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 19. 1902 



NO. 29. 




\CUTLERYy 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



J 




L 


n 




B 


QE jS 


L 



Canada's 
Favorite 
Galvanized Iron 

More |>o|>ular than ever — why ? 



JOHN LYSAGHT Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 



»*" 




ii 



Safford" Radiators 



Manufactured for Heating all 
classes of Buildings by Hot 
Water or Steam. Made in 
different heights, beautiful de- 
signs. Plain or Ornamental. 



THE DOMINION RADIATO R CO., Limited 

Head Office and Works: DUFFERIN ST. ' TORONTO, CAN. 



G 

R 
D 

E 
N 



VASES 
BENCHES 
BARROWS 
HOSE 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Write for Prices. 



INI 



We Carry in Stock a Full Line of the Following Goods : 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Canada Plates. 
Copper — Bar and Ingot. 

Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 

Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 
Copperine and Babbitt. 
Cotton Waste. 
Crucibles. 
Eave Trough — Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks 

ENQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 
Galvanized, " Gordon Crown." 
Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 

Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 

Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 

Lead Pipe. 

Solder — Half and Half and Standard. 

Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat 

Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 

Tin— Bar. 

Ingot, " L. & F." and Straits. 

Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 

Zinc — Sheets and Block. 



PLEASE WRITE EOR QUOTATIONS. 



* 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 



27 Wellington St. West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



Bagliah House : SAMOIL, SONS * BKNJAMIN. 164 Fenekurch St., LONDON, B.C. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THEYRE ALL ALIKE 




No 
Saw Edges 

No Soft Spots 

No Temper Streaks 

No Returned Blades 
to the Dealer 

Will Shave for Years 
Without Requiring Honing 



BOOKLET 

COMING 

if you'll ask for 
a copy with 
trade discount. 



Sold by all Leading Jobbers, 

Firm of 

A. L. SILBERSTEIN 



Mfrs. of 



»/7 . 



Cutlery 



453=461 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY. 



GARDEN HOSE 

Seamless Tube 



SEAMLESS TUBE 



LAPPED TUBE 




All brands of our GARDEN HOSE are 

made with our 

Patent Seamless Tube 



WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




"YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
N2IS, 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15- "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 






No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 50. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



No. 104 




No. 112 




WEDGE POINT 

Dealer's Card on Head in Gross Lots. 

No. 110 



NEEDLE POINT. 




WEDGE POINT SPRING PICK. 

Dealer's Card on Head in Gross Lotf. 



No. Ill 




WEDGE POINT SPRING PICK 
Splits Ice like an Axe. 

ANTI-RUST N1CKEL=PLATED 




WALKER'S QUICK AND EASY ICE PICKS. 

ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



Steel Tempered; will not Bend 
Break or Rust. 



PAINTS 



We manufacture 
these brands : — 
LION," "PEERLESS," "OWL," 
" RAVEN," also Ready-mixed 
House and Floor 
Paints, Roof, Darn, 
R ridge and Brick 
Paints, Coach Colors. 
Varnishes, Japans, 
etc. Our prices will in- 
terest you. Write us, 
The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont. 




-Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 
than the .... 
BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light- 

The saving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 

8W Orderdirector through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 

The Best Ready Roofing on Earth. 




TRINIDAD ASPHALT MFG. GO. 

Asphalt and Asbestine Gravelled 
READY ROOFING 

WITH INTERLOCKING LAP. 

.» Fire, water, acid or gas proof. 

Shipped with cement and nails for laying. 

ASPHALT. PAINT, CEMENT, COATING, ROOF- 
ING, DEADENING and SLATERS' FKLT. BUILD- 
ING and INSULATING PAPER of all kinds. The 
trade supplied. Prices and samples from the 

Canada Supply Co., Agents, Windsor, Ont. 

STOVE BRICK 

FIRECLAY AND ASBESTOS 
FURNACE CEMET 

all kinds of Fire Clay Products made to order from 
patterns. Write us for varieties and prices. 

JONES BROS., Bracondale, P.O., Ont. 

(near Toronto.) 



Lace Leather 

Send direct to us for the celebrated 
" NIAGARA " Brand Lace Leather, best 
produced in this country. Yellow and 
White in Sides or Cut Strings. Prices and 
Samples on application. 

WOOD BROS. 

Tanners of High-Class Leathers, 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 




arables & Ho are 

CORNWALL ROAD STANFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENC. 

Manufacturers oi 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the -works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



BISHOP & CO. 



Established 
I8S0. 



27 and 28 Little Trinity Lane, 



LONDON, ENG. 



54 Scotland St., SHEFFIELD 

Table Cutlery, all qualities. 



23 Vittoria St., BIRMINGHAM 

Wrought Steel Pots, round or oval. 



Samples on view at the following Agencies :— 

Alex. Thurber, 446 St. Paul St., 

E. Fielding, 34 Yonge St.. 

E. L. Denoncourt, 74 St. Joseph St., 



Tinned inside or enamelled. 

MONTREAL. 

TORONTO. 

QUEBEC. 



WIRE ROPE 



Wire Rope. 



OF. 




All Kinds and Sizes 



AND FOR 

All Purposes. 

PRICES RIGHT. PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 

The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 

BLACK BEAUTY LEATHER DRESSING. 

An absolute black, free from acid. Will not rot stitches, but preserves 
the leather. Renews color and life of a harness, no matter how old, red 
and stiff. Weather and water proof. 

Ask your dealer for it. If he has none in stock ask us for sample and price. 

We are sole agents for Canada. 



The Zanzibar Paint Co., Limited, 



Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






* r S 




rWanted, 10,000 Farm Hands 

TO BE SUPPLIED THROUGH OUR LARGE AND VARIED STOCK OF 

Husking Gloves, Harvest Mitts, Etc. 

The trade handling husking goods will find it to their interest to have us 
quote them before clacing their orders. 



NO. I — Steel clad husker, heavy 
calfskin, large steel hook, 
with polished steel shield. 
Fits the hand perfectly. 




NO. 0060— Husking Pin, made of sta&and 
riveted to muleskin. -Adjustable. 



akand 



PARIS GREEN, 
BINDER TWINE, 

WE SOLICIT VOUR ORDERS. 

*- 






NO. 0065— Similar to No. 0060, but has 
finger cot. 



NO. X 44 — Muleskin Glove, protected by 
steel discs and rivets. Steel pin. 



SPEEDY 
HIPMENTS 



HARVEST MITTS. 

With and without finger, in Sheep, Half-calf, Saranac, and Mule, 
10, 12 and 15 inches long. 



Black Hawk 



AND 



Plymouth Rock 



CORN SHELLERS 



SHELLERS THAT ARE SELLERS 



Lewis Bros. & Co. 



Montreal 



TORONTO, 

87 YORK ST. 



OTTAWA, 

54 QUEEN ST. 




BARCLAY 



JUNIOR 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the Celebrated 




HRS&C 

CANADA PLATES, "H. R. S. & CO." 
TINPLATES, "H. R. S. & CO." Charcoals. 
COIL CHAIN. "Rogers" Cokes. 

Canadian Office : 

6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TINWARE AND TIN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
Jacketed Oil Cans, 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Pails, Etc. 

JAS. A. McGOLPIN 

156=162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



THE 



DANDY SHINER 

(nickel plated) 
A HOUSEHOLD NECESSITY 




Holds shoe rigid. Fits any shoe. 3 lasts (men's, 
women's, child's) go with each shiner. 

Write for wholesale price to 

L. H. Packard & Co., Montreal. 



WATERBURY 
El W BRASS CO. 

Main Office and Mills at Waterbury, Conn. 

New York Store, No. 122 to No. 130 Centre St. 

Providence Store, No. 131 Dorrance St. and 

No. 152 Eddy St. 

Pope's Island "White" 

and 

"Gold Non-Conosive Metal" 

Suitable for Spinning, Drawing, Stamp- 
ing and Jewelers' Work. 

Brass, German Silver, Bronze and 
Copper in Sheets, Wire Rods, Brazed 
and Seamless Tubing. Metallic Eyelets, 
Shells, Ferrules and small brass wares 
of every description. 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited. 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan - American Exposition, 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

SISAL POPP Lath Yarn, Shingle Yarn, Hide DIMnCD TUfINC 
"ANILA KUKt, cord, Pulp Cord? Clothes Lines blWD£t< 'WINE 

Transmission Rope a Specialty. 





DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 



ST. MARYS, ONT , CANADA. 



" Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. sk/sw^ 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improv- 
ed for season of igo2. Steel or Wood Frame 
as desired. 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different Sizes. 



Steel Frame Churn 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



Wheels, 
o 20 in, 
widths. Cold Rolled 
Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



KNOX HENRY 



Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32 Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. k 
HORSE NAILS — " C " Brand Horse- Nails 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 
"BRASSITE" GOODS — Qnnn Castor Co. 

Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 

WILLIAM ABBOTT, Agent, 

Representing Manufacturers, 

Steel Beams, Channels, Angles, etc. 
Bar Iron and Steel, Plates, Tubes, etc. 
Brass and Copper Rods, Sheets, Pipes. 

CAST STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES. 
13 St. John Street, *m~- MONTREAL. 



1,000 PRINTED ENVELOPES 

For $1.00. 

We do good printing cheap— 500 
Noteheads, 500 Envelopes and 5CO 
Statements for |2.50. 

Snaps in Stationery of all kinds. 



WEESE A CO., J 
54 Vonge Street, • 




THE C. G. YOUNG CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

AND SUPPLIES 

No. I Adelaide Street East - Toronto 



The TORONTO SILVER PLATE CO., Limited 

Manufacturers of Sterling Silver and Electro Silver Plate. 





■ ■ ■■■ ■iiiiiiii iiiiniimniiui iiiiiiiiiiiiiliii 

TOH.ENC.GC. 



Our Fishing Flask, 

made in 2 and 3 gill 



and quart size. <~- C j 



We make everything in Silverware, to use a Hardware expression, from a needle to an anchor, and guarantee 
the quality ol everything stamped with our name and trade marks 

Why buy imported goods when you ran buy Canadian goods made by Canadian workmen, paid by Canadian 
capital, equally as good, if not better, and for less money ? 

FACTORIES AND SALESROOMS, - = - TORONTO, CANADA. 

E. G. GOODERHAM, MANAGING DIRECTOR. 



Luxfer Prisms! 



1 he best investment for 

Improving Business 

Premises. 



•VWWWWWVWWWWWWW 



Why 



do up-to-date busi- 
ness men install Luxfer 
Prisms in their store 
fronts or any place they 
are short of light ? 

^wvwwwwwwwwwwvw 



WRITE US. 




Interior Eice Lewis & Son, Toronto. 
Prisms in Front Windows. 



'VWVWWWWWVWWWVWW 

Because 

to get the best re- 
sults they must have the 
best goods. Thus ob- 
taining good clear white 

light which makes it 

easy to show and sell 
goods. 

•vwwwwwwwwvwwww^ 



Luxfer Prism Co., Limited 

IOO King Street West, - - TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDELIBLO PAINT 




Wl|| T ,j 



MIXES WITH COLD WATER 

comes in dry powder only. 5 lbs. will make a gallon of 
paint. Sells all the way from 5c. up to 10c, according 
to color. Waterproof, washable, sanitary, fireproof. No 
smell. No mess. The colors are rich and durable. 
The white is the purest in tone. Splendid for large 
buildings, factories, breweries, elevators, also shafts and 
alleyways. Ask for color card and complete price list. 
Money in it. 

Agents : 



A. RAMSAY & SON, 

j. n.AsnoowN, 
Mclennan, Mcfeely £» co., 



MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 

VANCOUVER 



BURMAN & SONS' clippers 

^^^ BIRMINGHAM, ENG. .°.d H S.r b ?£ 



NO. 297. 




NO. 3 POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint." 

rThe Czar of Russia. 
As supplied tCK The King of Denmark. 
(.Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 



Having bought the good-will, 
machinery and stock of Wm. Bown, 
Limietd, we shall in future supply the 
Celebrated " Newmarket " Clipper, 
marked exactly as before, with the 
addition of " Made by Burman & Sons, 
Limited, Birmingham " on the handles. 
Largest makers of Horse Clippers in 
the world. 




THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

To be obtained from all the principal Jobbers throughout 
the Dominion. 




«£ Australasian ** 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, • 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 

Park Row Building. 



- AZ Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 









™ / 3? 



iRll^ 



■^ Ltwreo. 



WE LEAD 

IN THE riANUFACTURE OF : 

Cold Pressed Nuts, 
Square and Hexagon, 
Finished and Semi-Finished, 
Cap Screws, 
Set Screws, * 

Thumb Screws, Bolts, 
Special Milled Work, etc. 

Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 

14-16 King St. East, TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NIXON -WINTERBOTTOM, 



Ltd. 




MANUFACTURERS. 

PYRAMID WORKS, 
SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 



n m 

PYRAMID CUTLERY CJ 
=r S^ SHEFFIELD _--"" 



Registered Trade Mark 




Registered Trade Mark. 


TABLE CUTLERY 
BUTCHERS' KNIVES & STEELS 
FARRIERS' KNIVES 


ESTABLISHED 

1861 


BREAD KNIVES 

PUTTY, PALLETTE, SHOE & 

POTATO KNIVES 


TELEGRAMS 
"PYRAMIDS, 

SHEFFIELD." 




o 

CO 

c/> m 

■o 

m o 
o x> 

S 73 



CO 

Canadian Agents: W. L. HALDIMAND & SONS, St. Dizier Street, MONTREAL. 



THE 



ESTABLISHED 1750 



TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS 
'? ROPERIE 



LEITH 






: UF ACTU RER 



1 

[STEAMER 
CLOTH 



Kg? AND* 

|£?SAILC10TW% 

WCDMPANYiJ 

feV LEITH ^ 

/750 



Cordage 



MANILA ROPE 

SISAL ROPE 

NEW ZEALAND ROPE 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHINC LINES 

NETTING TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS& PACKINCS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS 




& Canvas 




1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAULINCS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPING TWINES 



BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 






eoinburch 
Waterproof, 



# AND «£ 
WSAIL CLOTH % 
£COMPANY£> 
% LEITH # 
1150 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE AND STORES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 





One-Piece Stove Pipe Elbows. 
3 sizes. The strongest made. 



KEMP'S 

Stove 

—AND— 

Furnace 
Supplies 

are unexcelled in quality and 
workmanship. 



LITHOGRAPHED 

One-Piece 

STOVE BOARDS. 






FURNACE ELBOWS 

in 

TIN, GALVANIZED 



& 






and 



BLACK SHEET STEEL. 
COAL HODS. 



^*&ffS£ESSS^!l 


TKj! 


Wrta?V 


j\TO l ;ffi?^%5&'QrVi*wC»Q 




t/ jf^vtw 












r^tjSj'l 








-*^iriM^2ga^5aC3*4 




|^yS?T>fcj 


&$£SJ|i»eJ3®7i 






^ ^ssSlw^Swt^^tt 






ww firfc *! 








u^kJUT/. 


"X 1^7 vfl ^ i^'r^Ljr f^wf \n 






35§*l*5 


^^^3^n 


mJ 


C2S3 


rJSftwsJd^^sr'ftKSSLj 




L&rHftH 


stc^j^s^^^of^Cr 




*yw ja 










41* 


ra£$§3 


C^^^Sxx^SSpro? 




■ft xkPJ 


«S rXjJAO.'ffiVTit-^jw-^^ 




v 'SfSjM 


T^V^^ZRwtSf »i¥>>vV 


■E&B 


/ Vvr**4ffl 


SvS^^^fv-fflna: 




SJjotLE 


i t#tLagP^jC 'hrd-x^ST 


jJjtX 






H-fAStX'Km T"t 







Stove Pipe Extension Thimbles. 
Will fit any Wall or Ceiling. 



STOVE SHOVELS. 
COAL SIEVES. 

FLUE STOPPERS. 
STOVE PIPE COLLARS. 
STOVE PIPE DAMPERS. 



Kemp's Standard Stove Pipe 



(Nestable) 



Easily put together, requiring neither rivets or tools. 
Uniform in size, securing a perfect fit. . . . . 




1816 * 4 



0V)< 







We carry in stock a full line of Metals, comprising Canada Plate, Galvanized Iron and Black 

Steel Sheets, also Tinplate, etc., and would be pleased to quote for 

shipment from Stock or for Import. 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CAN. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



* 

* 

* 



PROFITS IN THE ^ >? 
RETAIL STOVE TRADE. 



A General Complaint 
Regarding Their <j» 
Inadequacy >? V *J» 



4 



IN CONNECTION wilh the growing 
sentiment among retail stove dealers 
that sufficient profits were not realized 
by retailers, Hardware and Metal 
obtained the opinions of the following 
representative retail dealers of Toronto : 

HANDLING EXPENSES. 

Mr. McDonald, of McDonald & Willson, 
187 Yonge street, said : "In the stove 
business I find the expense of handling 
stoves out of proportion to the volume of 
business to be done. For handling, at 
least two men and one horse are required. 
The ratio of profit is not sufficient to carry 
on a stove business by itself. We have 
here a satisfactory business ; but I can 
assure you we couldn't do business on 
Yonge street with a business handling stoves 
exclusively. To my knowledge, this is a 
condition of affairs that obtains everywhere 
in Canada and the United States. Stoves are 
usually sold in conjunction with other lines 
of goods. I think this is a necessity. At 
the same time, so far as I can learn, the 
ratio of profit is not so good here as in other 
lines. In my opinion the retailers don't 
get the fair proportion of the profit on a 
stove. As I said, the cost of handling is 
excessive. No, I could not suggest a 
remedy off-hand." 

COMPLAINTS ABOUT THE MANUFACTURERS. 

Mr. Scott, of Milne's Jewel Stove Store, 
4 Queen street east, when visited by Hard- 
ware and Metal made this statement : 
"Unless we carried on another business 
here in connection with the stove business, 
we would have to close up shop. In fact, 
the profits are so small in that line, it simply 
would not pay us to continue. I find that 
the manufacturer will sell stoves to private 
parties for less than we can secure them 
irom the wholesale manufacturer. If the 
manufacturer would not sell, the retail store 
would be able to make a fair profit. Two 
cases of this kind, both in connection with 
personal friends of my own, came under 
my notice within the last week. The men 
are getting more money per week to-day 
than the owners of small retail stores. 

" I firmly believe that if the retail men 
would amalgamate and refuse to take old 
stoves in exchange, in the same way that 
departmental stores do, our profits would be 



better. They get full profits for their wares ; 
we suffer loss on the old stoves." 

AMISS IN THEIR FIGURING. 

Mr. David Millar, manager of The 
Gurney Oxford Stove and Furnace Co., 
231 Yonge street, thus expressed himself: 
" There is positively no doubt of this. The 
profits to be realized handling stoves are 
certainly very discouraging. No, I can't 
exactly tell the cause of this, unless it be 
keenness of competition. What I believe 
to be an important factor in the unsatisfac- 
tory business of stoves is that dealers do 
not, in figuring on the price for sale, take 
into consideration all the elements of the 
cost. Thus, when they get their stove they 
figure on 25 per cent., but fail to reckon on 
the important feature of the cost of delivery 
or setting up. I'll show you an average 
case. Suppose I pay $19 for a stove. I'll 
reckon on 25 per cent, profit. Then I'll 
mark the price $23 75. But I have yet to 
pay for taper pipe 8c; cartage, 75c; fitting 
up, 90c. Mind you, I haven't considered 
the time spent by the boy in fixing mica, or 
the cost of storing the stove in my shop. 
My profit is about $2.50 or $3. But that 
isn't the worst cf the case. The depart- 
mental store will step in and sell this stove 
for $21.50, while we are making little 
enough by selling at $23.50. Our profits 
range from 12^ to 15 per cent, instead of 
from 20 to 25 per cent, at least. 

OLD STOVES. 

"No, I don't object to handling second- 
hand stoves. If we get a poor second-hand 
stove, and they generally are poor, we just 
hand them over to the junk men for old 
iron and no great trouble is occasioned us. 
If we get a good one we can make twice as 
much on it as we can on regular stoves, at 
the same time giving our customers first- 
class goods. We know that profit on 
ranges and heating stoves is not sufficient. 
It wouldn't pay us to handle them outside 
of jobbing work and other lines. Yet, I 
feel that ranges and heating stoves furnish 
us with a bulky system of expensive adver- 
tising. 

"We must also compete with shops where 
the dealer lets his boy or wife look after the 
business, and he does the jobbing or fitting 
up. They are often content, and are often 



under the necessity of getting rid of stock, 
and they sell at a very narrow margin. 
Again, their expenses are very low. We 
must be very careful or this will give our 
place the name of selling high priced 
articles. 

THE REMEDY. 

"There is, so far as I can see, only one 
remedy. There should be an association of 
stove dealers to set the price. The dealer 
should calculate on all the factors that go to 
make up the cost, the expenses of delivering 
and setting up as well as the money con- 
sideration paid for the stove itself. After 
that he should reckon on a good margin of 
25 per cent. I think it will ultimately come 
to this, but every person is afraid to take 
the initiative." 

DEPARTMENTAL STORE COMPETITION. 

Mr. S. J. Greer, of 108 Queen street east, 
when seen by Hardware and Metal, 
said in part : " Yes, we have some things 
to complain about. The departmental 
stores very often sell at too low a margin. 
I know cases where they sell gas stoves 
which cost $13 for $14. A great deal of 
our profit is minimized by the expense of 
setting up and delivery. I am informed, 
and I think the sources of my information 
are quite reliable, that the departmental 
stores often have their stoves shipped 
directly from the manufacturer, and do not 
need to have them set up. As to second- 
hand stoves, the poorer class we sell to the 
junkmen ; the rest are all right, and can be 
handled with advantage. I believe it is 
impossible for any man alive to pay rent 
and expenses and make a living by handling 
stoves alone. All of us are compelled to do 
jobbing work. The remedy for the present 
difficulties I think is, briefly, this : The 
association of stove dealers will have to 
advocate positively to refuse to buy from 
any manufacturer who sells retail." 
a discordant note. 

To all the harmony of these utterances 
Hardware and Metal heard one dis- 
cordant note. It was from a gentleman in 
charge of a large stove business on Queen 
street. The gentleman wished his name 
withheld, but his sentiments were given 
with considerable emphasis: 

" Such nonsense ! I don't believe a word 
of it. Certainly it is not true. If the deal- 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ers are not making a profit, they had better 
quit the business. Carry it on with other 
lines ! Well, any kind of business that 
will not stand on its own ground you had 
better get out of as soon as possible. I 
firmly believe that stove dealers make a fair 
rate of profit, and while we carry other 
lines it is not because we do not make our 
stoves pay and give our customers satisfac- 
tion too. That is what I think oi it, but 
don't you dare use my name." 



HARDWARE STORE STOVE 
RELIGION. 

A small hardware store and tinshop in 

Central Ohio displays this sign : 

We set up 

STOVES AND STOVEPIPES 

with Expedition, Neatness, Dispatch, and the 

proper tools, and 

WITHOUT PROFANITY. 

Patronize your tinner 

And don't be a sinner. 

AN AMATEUR who sets up a stove will swear 

even if he has been a deacon for fifteen years. 

"Thou Shalt Not Swear." 



WESTERN STOVE PRICES ADVANCE. 

The Western Association of Stove Manu- 
facturers, of the United States, met in 
Chicago on July 8, the result of the con- 
ference being an advance of 5 per cent, in 
the prices of all stoves. The reason 
assigned for the advance is the sharp 
advance in the prices of pig iron and other 
raw material. There was a strong disposi- 
tion, according to The Metal Worker, to 
advance prices 10 per cent., but it was 
thought best to pursue a conservative course, 
especially as the crop outlook is as yet 
uncertain. In view of the further advance 
in pig iron during the past few days, how- 
ever, it would not be surprising if another 
5 per cent, advance were made within the 
near future. 



A NEW COOK STOVE. 

The accompanying cut shows the Corona- 
tion Wood Cook Stpioe just put on the 
market by The Ottawa Furnace and 
Foundry Co., Limited, who claim that it is 
one of the most perfect cook stoves ever 
produced, having all the latest improve- 
ments, with an entirely new and beautiful 



WHEELER & BAIN'S FURNACES. 

Wheeler & Bain, one of Toronto's old 
established firms, manufacture a full line of 
"Success" warm air furnaces; and their 
aim is to make a first-class article in the 
furnace line rather than a low-priced flimsy 
affair that will be dear at any price. Some 
of their furnaces have been in constant use 
for 18 years, and are still in good con- 
dition. These furnaces are made very 
heavy in the firepots, and with heavy sheet 
steel dome and radiators. From their 
peculiar construction they give the maxi- 
mum of heat with the minimum consump- 
tion of fuel, and will soon pay for themselves 
by the saving effected in fuel. 




The Ottawa Furnace Co.'s New Stove. 



design. The Coronation is made in three 
sizes, Nos. 9 21, 923, 9-25, with either cast 
or steel ovens. 

The Ottawa Furnace and Foundry Co., 
Limited, have just completed the patterns 
of a new wood furnace of the most ap- 
proved style, and with this, in addition to 
their already well-known line of National 
Furnaces, they expect to do a large business 
this season. Catalogues and price lists will 
be sent to the trade on application. 



This firm also manufacture the "Suc- 
cess ' ' feed cooker, something that every 
farmer should have, as with it he can cook 
all his food for cattle, hogs, chickens, etc., 
and effect a great saving of feed. It is 
made in five sizes, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 
1 50 gallons capacity. As these feed cook- 
ers are sold at reasonable prices to the 
trade you can handle them to good advant- 
age and have a quick sale. 

Wheeler & Bain also manufacture a full 



line of galvanized iron ca vet roughs, corru- 
gated and round conductor pipes, corrugated 
galvanized sheets, skylights, cornices, etc. 
Cuts of their furnace and feed cooker will 
be found on another page. 



COLD BLAST LANTERN. 

AN excellent article is being placed 
on the market by The Kemp 
Manufacturing Co. in the shape 
of a cold blast lantern. It is made com- 
bination, either lift or hinge. Its perfect 




safety is insured by a broad base which 
renders the lantern solid and not easily 
upset. The oil well is a special feature, 
made as it is of extra heavy material and 
with a concave bottom to greatly increase 
its capacity. The tubes are made in one 
piece with seams on the inside, thus mak- 
ing the lantern present a neat appearance. 
The globe is fully protected. The tubes on 
either side combine with the wires that sur- 
round it to place it out of danger. A 
simple device is used to hold up the globe. 
By dropping the handle underneath it is 
held in place. All the lanterns are made 
with the greatest care and in the strongest 
manner possible. Each lantern has a 
guarantee placed on it in a most con- 
spicuous place. 



AN ENGLISH METHOD OF HEATING 
CARS. 

The Northwestern Railway Co. of Eng- 
land, says The Scientific American, have 
equipped some of their trains with a system 
of heating to which the much abused term 
"unique" may well be applied. Two 
concentric cylinders are employed, the 
annular space between which communicates 
with a steam pipe extending from the loco- 
motive boiler. The inner cylinder contains 
acetate of soda — a compound remarkable 
for its property of liquifying when heated 
and of cooling very slowly. The radiators 
thus constituted are incased in asbestos 
lined boxes having hinged doors. By 
opening or closing the door of a box the 
heat is turned on or off. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



We could live without Literature, Science and Arts ; 
We could live without Knowledge and what it imparts ; 
We could live without Coachmen, Horses and Carriages ; 
We could live without Relatives contracted by Marriages ; 
We could live without Music, or reading of Books, 
But where are the men who could live without Cooks ? 





We make a full line of Ranges, Cook and Heating Stoves. 

If you have not our Catalogue of the "Good Cheer " line, send for it. 
We can meet your requirements in Stoves of all classes. 



The Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Limited 



the j. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO., limited, 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Sole Representatives Manitoba and N. W. Territories 



WOODSTOCK, ONT. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



DOUBLE-HEATING AIR-TIGHT 
STOVE. 

THE attention of the many readers of 
Hardware and Metal is directed 
to the announcement of The D. 
Moore Company, Limited, Hamilton, manu- 
facturers of "Treasure" Stoves and Ranges, 
(page 19). This company, in anticipation 
of their usual annual increase in output, 
have this Spring made further extensive 
warehouse additions to their plant, thus 
placing them in a position to handle 
i promptly all orders for their popular line of 
• Treasure" stoves and ranges. The 
stock carried by this company is larger than 
in any previous season and includes many 
new and exclusive patterns which should 
materially assist to increase the* coming 




Air-Tight Stove.— Patent applied for. 

season's business of handlers of this com- 
pany's many lines. The " Art Treasure " 
double-heating base burner, advertised in 
this issue, is this company's latest produc- 
tion in the line of high.class heaters. Its 
construction introduces many new and 
original features with the idea of producing 
the greatest possible quantity of heat with 
the least consumption of fuel. They have 
also added some desirable goods to their 
"Air Tight" and "Hot Blast" lines, 
noticeably a double-heating air-tight, with 
cast iron top, construction of which has been 
patented. This stove was being tested at 
the time of writing. It takes its cold air 
from the floor and is a wonder in heat pro- 
duction. Their new " Hot Blast" for 1902 
is a handsome and substantial structure, 
with a heavy cast iron bottom. This stove 
is built with an air blast, and completely con- 
sumes all gases which in ordinary hot blasts 
escape into the chimney. This construction 
adds at least one-half to its heating capa- 
city. 

This company's lines of ranges, coal 
cooks, wood cooks and "Oaks" are always 
leaders in their class. This company issue 



handsome descriptive booklets and printed 
matter of all their principal lines, which 
they are pleased to mail to dealers or their 
friends on application. 



HEATING A RESIDENCE WITH 
STEAM. 

In solving the problem of heating, the 
question of ventilation has also received the 
attention to which it is entitled, and the 
most modern systems provide a pure 
atmosphere, as well as a comfortable 
temperature, says Metal Worker. Favor is 
shown those systems which supply continu- 
ously an inflow of pure, warm air, and their 
use has revealed the necessity of providing 
some method of exhausting the air in a 
building to make room for it. The open 
fireplaces, which have been regarded as 
luxurious for a number of years, are now 
being used to create an outflow or exhaust 
current by means of heat supplied from a 
fire or otherwise. By removing the foul air 
the efficiency of the heating system is 
increased by facilitating the inflow of fresh, 
pure air. /* 



MAXIMUM FURNACE PRICES. 

Furnaces are used in houses in Canada 
up to value of $2,000, $3 000 and $5,000 ; 
in United States houses worth even $25,000 
have furnaces. 



IRON WORKS CHANGE HANDS. 

J. J. Cunningham and four other 
gentlemen of Toronto have purchased the 
iron works at Wingham for $8,530. The 
new company will manufacture a full line 
of furnaces, stoves and ranges. Mr. 
Cunningham has been mechanical super- 
intendent of the Gurney stove works for the 
past ten years. 



STOVE BOARDS. 



The Kemp Manufacturing Company are 
handling a splendid line of stove boards. 
They are made in one piece and are lined 
with wood. The two thicknesses of lumber 
are arranged crosswise, thus preventing the 
boards from shrinking or the tin from bulg- 
ing. A special excellence to be noted is 
that the tin is put on the wood lining in such 
a manner as not to require nails or tacks. 
In this way the boards are left perfectly 
smooth and can be easily cleaned. They 
can also be shifted on the carpet without 
catching. These stove boards are made in 
six handsome colors of mosaic tile design. 



GAS AND OIL STOVE TRADE IN THE 
STATES. 

OBSERVERS have been impressed 
with the increase in the demand 
for gas and oil stoves since the 
inauguration of the coal strike. The rise in 
the price of coal has prepared the minds of 
the public in general to receive with more 
interest information about other kinds of 
cooking apparatus than the universally used 
coal stove. Many of the older and more 
conservative citizens, who have heretofore 
shown little or no interest in the new- 
fangled cooking devices used by their 
neighbors, are now inclined to listen at- 
tentively to the explanations of a gas 
range, a gasoline stove or a blue flame oil 
cooking apparatus given at the store which 
they have taken the trouble to visit for the 
purpose of securing information. Those 
dealers who for a number of years have 
carried such goods in stock are now reaping 
the reward of their enterprise. This should 
suggest to all dealers in stoves and house- 
furnishing goods that something more than 
a mere display of gas and oil stoves in the 
store is necessary to reap the full benefit of 
the conditions which the coal strike has 
brought about. Most of the manufacturers 
of what has heretofore been termed "sum- 
mer cooking apparatus " are willing to 
furnish circulars explaining the advantages 
possessed by their goods. The dealer who 
takes advantage of this opportunity to 
secure circulars and have them distributed 
at the houses of prospective purchasers will 
be making an effort that should materially 
increase his sales. 

If the distribution is made by someone 
who can intelligently explain the goods, 
and particularly if the visits are made in the 
forenoon, when the kitchen is in use, the 
effect will be greater, and it is also possible 
that orders for repairs for the coal stoves in 
use could be secured, which would help to 
defray the expenses of the canvass. A 
special effort to increase their trade in the 
line indicated has evidently been made by 
dealers in different sections, and as a result 
the manufacturers and jobbers of gas, 
gasoline and oil stoves have been well 
occupied. — The Metal Worker. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment: 



James Bremner, general merchant, Harts- 
mere and McArthurr's Mills, Ont., has sold 
out at McArthur's Mills to W. L. Wanna- 
maker. 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON. ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 







HANDY FURNACE RULES AND 
CALCULATIONS. 

HARDWARE AND METAL is in- 
debted to Mr. Jas. A. Harding for 
furnace rules and calculations. He 
says that in making the calculation for the 
sizes of warm air pipes it is unavoidable 
that two of the factors employed be assumed, 
viz., the maximum temperature of the heated 
air and the maximum velocity of air through 
the pipes. 

* ' As the lesser is always contained within 
the greater, in all conditions of weather less 
severe than the said extreme, the fire will 
be regulated to provide for the desired 
temperature in the house with a lower 
temperature of the heated air, and, conse- 
quently, less velocity of air through the 
pipes. 

" From a hygienic standpoint, I think it 
desirable that the temperature of the heated 
air should not exceed 140 deg. F. at the 
register, and at this temperature the net 
working velocity for the whole calibre of a 
warm-air pipe, allowance being made for 
friction, will not exceed an average of 3 ft. 
per second — equal to 10,800 ft. per hour — 
which figure I will use for convenience. 

' ' For establishing a general rule, it is 
necessary to deal with averages in this 
matter, inasmuch as a positive and constant 
flow of warm air through pipes, induced by 
force of gravity and unaided by mechanical 
means, is menaced by an endless variety of 
conditions inherent in a dwelling house, any 
one of which is sufficient to seriously retard 
or entirely prevent circulation. 

" What these conditions are and how to 
provide for them constitute the elements of 
furnace heating which are solvable by ex- 
perience only, and not susceptible of being 
reduced to formulae This latter statement 
does not imply that a rule for determining 
the size of suitable warm air pipes cannot 
be evolved. It simply means that after the 
machine is well built and entirely completed 
a furnace doctor may be required to set it 
going as intended. 

" In pipes leading to rooms where suit- 
able provisions for ventilation have been 
made the flow of air will be generally con- 
stant. But as the majority of rooms in 
dwelling houses are not provided with 
means of ventilation, and many such rooms 
are isolated, their space confined by closing 
the doors and the rooms subject to wind 
pressure from exposure to high winds, it is 
obvious that the size of the warm air pipe 
becomes, in many cases, the least impor- 
tant detail of the provisions for heating. 

"For example, the dining-room : Its glass 
surface is 96 sq. ft. ; exposed wall surface, 
184 sq. ft.; cubic space, 2,933 ft. I com- 




A Money- 
Making 
Specialty. 



THE SHERWIN-WIL- 
LIAMS BUGGY PAINT 
for painting and varnishing 
at one operation Carriages, 
Wagons, Sleighs, Carts, 

Porch, Lawn and Kitchen Furniture, Farm Im- 
plements, Boats, Machinery, etc., is a good 
money-maker. 

It pleases the user and does good work every 
time. It comes in eight splendid shades, and is 
one of the best selling paint specialties a dealer 
could have on his shelves. Write to-day for 
prices and further information. 





pute the incidental ingress of cold air to a 
first-storey room of an ordinary dwelling to 
be twice its contents per hour. In the present 
case it will equal 2.933 x 2 = S. 866 cubic ft. 
The total equivalent glass surface of this 
room, or heat units required to warm it 
to 70 deg. F. in zero weather, will be 

96 + ™ + ^ x 7o deg. =17 430- These 
17,430 heat units are to be supplied to the 
room by means of heated air introduced at 
a temperature of 140 deg. F. 

" The outdoor temperature being o deg. 
F., each cubic foot of air at 140 deg. willcon- 
tain - = 25 heat units ; and the total 
volume of air at 140 deg. required per hour 
w iH be i|^5 = 6,972 cubic feet. The velo- 
city of air in the pipe being 10,800 ft. per 
hour, the calibre or cross-sectional area of 
the pipe should be ^m sc l uare feet > which 
equals 93 square inches, or a pipe of n in. 
in diameter. 

"We thus establish a rule for determining 
the size of a warm air pipe as follows, viz. : 
Multiply the total glass surface equivalent of 
the room by the difference in tempera- 
ture (indoors and out) and divide the 
product by 2.5. Divide the quotient thus 
obtained by 10,800, and the result will be 
the area of the warm air pipe in square feet 
or fractional parts thereof. 



" With regard to the size of register, it is 
simply neccessary to provide for a free area 
of opening a trifle in excess of the pipe area, 
in order to make due allowance for the 
friction incident to the passage of air through 
it. The free area of a register will average 
two-thirds its dimensions, and if the full 
area of its opening is one-half larger than 
the area of the pipe, it is sufficient." 



STOVE LININGS. 



Jones Bros., the well-known manufac- 
turers of stove linings, at Bracondale, near 
Toronto, are actively preparing for the Fall 
campaign by strengthening their stock in 
all lines. These include stove linings, 
open-grate backs, furnace bricks, range 
bricks, fire clay, stove cement, etc. This 
firm's linings are known as the " Maple 
Leaf ' ' brand, and only goods of first-class 
quality are allowed to go out from their 
kilns. In addition to a large stock of 
standard lines ready for immediate ship- 
ment, they are in a position to manufacture 
any special patterns desired on the shortest 
possible notice. Stove dealers will do well 
to look over their stock of linings prepara- 
tory to the fall trade, as this is the time for 
filling up the gap. A post card addressed 
to Jones Bros., Bracondale P.O., will bring 
their new fall catalogue, just issued, to you. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CONSOLIDATION VS. SURVIVAL OF 
THE FITTEST. 

IF, in fine residences, the steam and hot 
water installations were designed and 
executed with the average intelligence 
which dominates the ordinary setter of the 
average hot air furnace, their glory would 
soon depart, writes W. R. M. in Metal 
Worker. No other system could survive 
the general treatment administered to the 
hot air furnace system by manifold joints 
between combustion chamber and hot air 
chamber ; by overestimating the capacity by 
the dealer ; by hasty and careless pack- 
ing of joints by the setter and by the 
fervent ejaculations of disapproval by 
the householders, with other happenings 
and incidentals too numerous to mention, 
all of which contribute to bring the present 
system of furnace work into disrepute. The 
very fact that under these conditions the 
furnace survives at all marks the ' ' survival 
of the fittest." 

Of course there are furnaces and furnaces. 
Many of them are installed with the rare 
skill and painstaking effort only acquired 
by years of practical experience and the 
results of this experience are shown in the 
successive improvements made in some 
heaters by the progressive manufacturers. 
But the mass of the furnace trade may be 
assumed to pass through less careful, less 
skillful hands, and in the deal and shuttle 
the prestige of the " Ichabod No. 8o," the 
salvation of the corporal of industry who 
sells it, and the reputation of the manufac- 
turer are in danger. 

How are we to remedy this state of 
anarchy and meet the condition squarely ? 
Coming down to fixed principles it would 
seem that consolidation of interests would 
prove for the economical inauguration of 
systematic reform, as well as for the eco- 
nomical administration of affairs. Tbe fur- 
nishing of uniform patterns at small cost to 
individual manufacturers would be of 
immense advantage. The ideal furnare 
should be uniform and interchangeable in 
its parts ; and, like the telephone, for 
instance, it should be distributed to agents 
from a central point. Or, duplicate iron 
patterns could be awarded to those entitled 
to use them. 

The ideal furnace of the twentieth century 
should be practically a new creation, one 
avoiding the joints between the combustion 
and air chambers, and so complete in its 
details that the heating surface for each 
room may be determined separately, and 
allotted and operated with the same exact- 
ness, as are the radiators of direct and 
indirect steam and hot water installations. 

It should also operate separate air circuits 
o and through every room. 



1871 



1902 



IVER JOHNSON 

For 31 years this name has stood for 
EXPERIENCE AND EXCELLENCE. 

The most convincing evidence of this assertion that can be produced is the 

Iver Johnson Top Snap Single Gun 




A gun that the trade prefers and the public demand. 

WHY ? 

Send for our new catalog just published and we will tell you more about it. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CY CLE WORKS, 

New Vork Office: 99 Chambers St. ^^^^~ FITCHBURG, MASS. 

THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

. . . Successors to . . . 
The Toronto Branch of THE COPP BROS. CO., Limited. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Mantels, Orates, Tiles, etc. Coal Grates. Gas Grates. Gas Logs. 

HOT-AIR REGISTERS A SPECIALTY. 

Stove repairs for the Copp Bros', make of Stoves and Furnaces. 

New Address— 76 York: St., TORONTO. 



"PAGE METAL GATES are so low in price] 

no one can afford 
Z to use wooden ones. Light, and yet strong enough to sup- 
port a heavy man on the end while he swings around the 
circle without causing them to sag. They are neat in 
appearance, will last a lifetime. Will not sag nor get rickety. 
They are supplied with latches which allow them to be open- 
ed either way and are self acting. The only good metal gate 
that is low enough in price for general farm purposes. We also make Farm and Ornamental 
Fence, Poultry Netting, Nails and Staples. The Page Wire Fence Co. .Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 1 




H. & R. SINGLE CUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 

Steel and Twist Barrels 
Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
" Take Down ' 
Gun Made. 




HARRINGTON &. RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers. 

Catalog on requrst. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



THE BELLEVILLE BUSINESS COLLEGE, LIMITED 

BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO. 

o J. Frith Jeffers, M.A., Principal. 



Send for handsome Catalogue 

fully describing all Courses taught 



WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very i 
m liberal. A trial order solicited. Write for discounts. 



s. 



99 Niagara St., 



TORONTO FILE CO. 



CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS. 



s. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS *£k 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



-ittMfeiF ront Street West - Toronto. wh£S&l« 

Stove Furniture, Etc. *™™ED 

£— *> AUG 14 1902 







Stove Boards. 



The Adams Registers. 
FOR OTHER LINES SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE. 



Stove Pipe Shelves, 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., um.ted, Toronto. 

©rahanri Nails are the Best:. 

Factory: Dufferln Street, Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



McCLARY'S NEW STOVES AND FURNACES. 



THE McClary Manufacturing Co., ot 
London, Ont., report that they have 
made a number of changes in their 
last year's stoves, ranges and furnaces, and 
and have also added several entirely new 
lines. 

the "Cornwall's" success. 

Last year, The McClary Co. made a 
number of changes in the "Cornwall," and 
brought it out as their leading steel range. 
Since then, they have advertised it very 
extensively with the most gratifying results, 
and report that its sales this year are 
greatly in excess of last year of even date. 

"KOOTENAV" STEEL RANGE. 

The "Kootenay" has always been one 
of the best- selling steel ranges made by The 
McClary Co., and to make it a still better 
seller they have given it an entirely new 
dress, including nickel edges, nickel teapot 
shelves, medallions, shakers, knobs, etc. 
The "Kootenay" is built on nearly the 
same lines as the "Cornwall," and em- 
bodies all of its best features, such as the 
ventilated oven, deep firebox fitted with 
clinkerless duplex grates and heavy sectional 
cast iron linings, asbestos-lined oven, sec- 
tional top, etc., but is made of lighter steel, 
and is therefore cheaper. 

CAST IRON LEADER. 

The "Famous Active" range needs no 
introduction, it being well known to the 
trade that this range is McClary' s leader. 
The " Famous Active " is one of the most 
widely advertised ranges in Canada, and 
is, therefore, well known to the Canadian 
people. Since it was first put on the market 
the sales of the "Famous Active" have 
each year trebled those of the preceding 
year. 

" LE ROY" STEEL RANGE. 

This range was brought out two years 
ago to fill a long-standing need in the more 
unsettled parts of Canada for a light cook- 
ing range that will stand a lot of rough 
usage, do good work and sell at a reasonable 
price. And its success, which was assured 
from its introduction, was so pronounced 
last year that the McClary people decided 
to add another size, No. 9, to this line. No. 
9 differs from Nos. 7 and 8 in having a 
hearth-plate and being a larger size. 

A NEW HOT BLAST HEATER. 

The " Excelsior " is another line of hot 
blast heaters which the McClary Co. are 
showing this year. A rich nickel dress, 
combined with an extra fine finish, makes 
the "Excelsior " one of the most handsome 
heaters in its class. It has a centre down 
draft with register in top and is especially 
' made for coal or coke. Although only 



placed on the market this year by the Mc- 
Clary Co., this heater has already shown 
itself to be a good seller. 

A NEW BOX STOVE. 

The " Beechwood " is a new box stove, 
this being its first year on the market. It 
has a large feed door and swing top which 
will admit rough chunks of wood. The 
design is handsome, while the carving is 
especially rich. 

"TORTOISE" — NEW HEATER. 

This also is a new line and is described 
as being a "slow but sure" heater. It 
has a firebrick lining on bottom and sides 
while the body is made of heavy steel 
plate and the top and bottom are cast iron. 
It is a direct draft surface burner, and made 
in four sizes for hard coal only. 

A NEW HEATER. 

The "Belle Oak " is another new heater 
which the McClary Co. have brought out 
this year. It has an artistic design, a 
polished sheet steel body, rich nickel dress, 
screw drafts, is made in four sizes, burns 
coal or wood, and is sold at a very moder- 
ate price. 

A NEW COOK STOVE. 

The " Defiant" is an entirely new line 
made to take the place of the "Sergeant," 
which stove the McClary people have ceased 
to make. This new cook stove has a roomy 
fire box, with heavy sectional cast iron lin- 
ings and fiat-shaking grate, and the ash pan 
is very large. Although a cheap stove, it 
has a handsome design, and is well 
ornamented. 

In addition to those already mentioned, 
The McClary Manufacturing Company have 
several other new lines this year, and also 
report changes in a number of last year's, 
among the latter being the "Boss" cone 
heater, in which the feed door has been 
considerably enlarged. The "Famous" 
gas range has come in for several improve- 
ments, and two additional sizes, Nos. 500 
and 600, have been added to their No. 100 
series of airtight heaters, while the bodies 
of all their air.tights have been made 
deeper. 

The "Farmers' Boiler" is an entirely 
new line of cookers. Is made of steel 
plate, in three sizes, and can be supplied 
with or without cover. The "Excelsior" 
is also a new line of feed cookers which 
the McClary Company are showing this 
year. This cooker is made in one size, 
and is similar in design to their " Famous 
Evaporator." 

THE "SUNSHINE'S" SUCCESS. 

Last year this furnace was quite new on 
the market, having been put out for the first 



time in the fall of 1900. But, although a 
new heater, the McClary Co. soon demon- 
strated that it was no experiment, but rather 
the result of a level-headed use of the 
experience gained from over 50 years of 
furnace-building. This year No. 600 has 
been added, which is a larger size than 
those of last year. This additional size 
makes the " Sunshine " line complete, and 
provides a size for any building, large or 
small. Since its introduction the "Sunshine" 
has been extensively advertised in all parts 
of Canada, and this, together with the 
excellent satisfaction reported from all those 
in use, has made it one of the best known 
and most successful warm-air furnaces on 
the market, and should result in an enor- 
mous sale this year. 

"magnet" wood furnace. 
The " Magnet " has come in for several 
changes this year, among them being the 
enlargement of the fire box in a number of 
sizes and also an improvement in the con- 
struction of the radiator. This furnace has 
always enjoyed a good reputation and a 
large sale and is considered by the trade to 
be second to none as a wood furnace. It 
is a well-known fact that the McClary 
Manufacturing Company, of London, were 
obliged to cancel many thousands of dol 
lars worth of orders last year, owing to 
the unusually heavy demand for their 
" Famous " lines. Being asked if they will 
be able to meet the demand this year the 
answer comes that the present indications 
point to a much heavier business than in 
1 90 1, and that they are operating both 
their Hamilton (late Copp stove works) and 
London foundries to their full capacities 
with the hope of being able to fill all orders, 
but state that they cannot give very strong 
assurances of filling all orders unless placed 
for early date shipment. 



ADJUSTABLE STOVE TOP. 

A Chicago woman has patented an ad- 
justable stove top to put a sad iron in and 
heat it at a moment's notice. The new top 
guarantees against draughts, the bane of the 
laundress who has to melt behind closed 
windows to keep her irons at the proper 
temperature. The top is of sheet iron. It 
fits over an ordinary gas stove burner, and 
it has a sliding cover to fit around the flat 
iron handles, leaving them out in the cool 
air while the body of the iron is sizzling 
underneath. The top not only heats irons, 
but it bakes potatoes, cooks squash to a 
turn, and browns biscuits. In fact, it does 
all the cooking that any one indulging in 
light housekeeping could desire. All this 
is accomplished by means of asbestos plates 
over the blaze, the number of plates em- 
ployed being according to the amount of 
heat required for the different materials. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



rFgfr~Hj» ihar^^afiff i~^m 




Will give more heat with a given 
amount of coal than any heater 
on the market 



Handle the best 
and save trouble. 



Manufactured by 

.E.Shantz&Co. 

BERLIN. 



The Improved 
Celebrated 

Howard 



Warm Air and 
Combination Heaters, 



Noted for long fire 
travel and perfect 
combustion. 




18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



^wwwwwwwwwvwwvwwwwwwwywywww^^ 



Features and Facts Regarding the Stove 
and Furnace Trade. 



^fflrWMMMrWMrWMMrWKfW^ 



TO be able to meet the special needs of 
individual localities and of particular 
persons demands a heavy and varied 
stock ; but it also commands success. The 
Dominion of Canada will no longer be 
satisfied with one or two lines of heating or 
cooking stoves. Conditions and circum- 
stances vary in sections closely situated. 
The demand of particular regions is gov- 
erned and created by the quantity and 
nature of fuel in the district, by the 
character of the climate, and, more than 
anything beside, by the financial condition 
of the people, Each apparatus must have 
some distinct feature adapted to the prevail- 
ing conditions of a district. Manufacturers 
must supply innumerable styles and sizes 
of stoves and cooking and heating apparatus 
to suit every vaiiation in climate, every 
kind of fuel, every siz? of house, and at 
prices to meet the purchasing power of every 
class of people. 

Quoth a large wholesaler to Hardware 
and Metal : " The retail man who carries 
the largest display and the best variety will 
get the largest percentage of business. 
What applies to other lines applies to 
stoves. Stoves need to be kept clean and 
attractive. Some dealers don't seem to think 
it necessary to dust off stoves. This I con 
sider a great mistake." 

TASTE IN THE STOVE TRADE 

Even with stoves taste is necessary. The 
very difficulty of making an attractive dis- 
play is the very reason for the success of 
the dealer whose wares present a bright, 
inviting appearance. Always have the 
stoves neat and shining, with a specially 
good one in the window. Furniture and 
fixtures show the stove to good advan- 
tage. Colored mica with a lamp inside or 
a gas jet, if obtainable, will give a splendid 
representation of a stove in operation. The 
cheery, bright aspect will command inspec- 
tion. Inspection is potential sale. 

A BUSY SEASON. 

This season will be an exceptionally good 
one. Manufacturers will sell more stoves 
than they will be able to supply. Increases 
in trade are largely due to the development 
and prosperity of New Ontario and the 
Northwest. It is safe to say that most of 
the manufacturers will sell ioo per cent, 
more goods in the Northwest than were sold 



two years ago. The vice-president of one 
of the largest Canadian firms says that his 
firm could sell the entire output in the 
Northwest. There is every indication that 
the demand will grow each year as the 
country prospers. 

" What is your policy in the matter of 
advertising ? " was the question put to a 
prominent wholesaler and a successful 
retailer. Replied the wholesaler : 'To 
reach the general public the best way is to 
advertise heavily in newspapers ; to secure 
the retailers, trade journals are the best." 
The retailer replied : " Sell good goods ; 
keep your word; live up to your guarantee." 

STEEL RANGES. 

Ranges are becoming more popular ; 
steel ranges are growing in favor. Their 
peculiar features are the facts that they con- 
fine the heat through the use of asbestos 
sheets and are less liable to breakage. The 
difference in expense is not so great as it 
was a few years ago. 

Furnaces have displaced hase burners in 
towns and cities. Even among farmers 
they are becoming more popular ; they are 
more economical. Their convenience and 
the possibility of heating the house all over 
are largely increasing their sales. 

There is a growing feeling in the trade 
that the furnace business is done 

TOO CHEAP 

in Canada. The keen competition among 
manufacturers resu'ts in inferior jobs being 
put in at inferior prices In United States 
cities there is a growing demand for first 
class warm-air furnace work. The jobs 
command good prices and the results 
obtained are first class. In Canada there 
doesn't seem to be an appreciation for really 
first-class work. In the United S:ates hou ; e j 
worth $10,000 to $25,000 are putting in 
warm-air furnaces. Manufacturers should 
struggle to raise quality of work, not to cut 
prices down. Larger profits wou'.d accrue 
and results would be more satisfactory to the 
manufacturer, dealer and user. An increased 
sale of a superior article would follow. The 
tendency in cheap work is to put in small 
furnaces and overcrowd them with work. 

The hot-water combination trade is grow- 
ing for buildings of scattered construction. 



A NEAT DISPLAY. 

I noticed a neat display of stoves on 
Queen street. Toronto, last week. A large 
handsome stove occupied the centre of a 
large window ; while around it were placed 
such articles of interest as a radiator, gas 
water-heater, gasoline stoves, stove polish 
and stove brushes. The whole was mounted 
on neat oilcloth, while bright display cards 
announced, "Gas water-heater; enough 
water for a bath in 15 minutes." Another 
showcard, leaning against the radiator, pro- 
claimed in words of neat design, " We give 
estimates for hot-air combination and hot- 
air heating." Still another card drew 
attention, "A bargain ; 3-burner gas stove 
$7.50." Business means money, and a 
proper display of goods produces the re- 
quired business. 



A LARGE NEW MOULDING SHOP. 

TheMcClary Manufacturing Co. .London, 
have purchased in that city the whole block 
of land inclosed by William, Nelson and 
Adelaide streets and the river, and a large 
parcel of land east of Adelaide. Within 
the block mentioned they will construct a 
series of buildings, wherein something over 
400 men will be employed. This will rival 
in extent their immense establishment on 
King, Wellington and York streets. 

To carry out the proposed arrangements 
Trafalgar street will be closed. The plant 
will comprise a moulding shop, mounting 
shop, power house and storage, a polishing 
shop and other smaller buildings. The 
fonndry will be about the largest in Canada 
— 200 x 230 ft. The mounting shop will be 
75 x 300 ft., and the other buildings will be 
of proportionate dimensions. The plans 
have already been prepared, and the 
buildings will be thoroughly modern in 
construction and equipment. 

The new plant is directly across the cpad 
from the rolling mills that are to be erected 
by John White & Sons, and both places will 
be on the new belt line that is to connect 
with the London and Port Stanley Railroad, 
by means of which the new enterprise will 
be brought into close touch with outside 
markets. The McClary Co. intend to build 
also a sub.switch that will run from the belt 
line right into the heart of their new 
establishment. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



The Best Selling 
Range Ever Made. 

Popular with dealers in every part of the country be- 
cause it is so enthusiastically praised by every buyer. 

Our Imperial Oxford 



has won its laurels — it is the favorite range of Canada 
— widely advertised and everywhere appreciated for 
its practical superiority. 

Are you familiar with its 
Diffusive Flue Construction 
Front Draw=Out Grate 
Draw=Out Oven Rack 

and other talking points 



•> 



If there's any range business in your locality you'll 
get it by handling the Imperial Oxford. Fullest details 
if you write 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. jh wmmmmmmmssmMiims^kjmg^ 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 




.-* 




44 



ART 



1) 



tk 



TREASURE 



New for Season 1902. 



A Merchant Should Buy 



from a firm who will give him the most value in 
the same quantity of goods. 

Try the TREASURE LINE of STOVES and 
RANGES for 1902. 



THE PRICES ARE RIGHT. 



Your customer will be your friend and his friend 
will be your customer. 

The D. MOORE COMPANY 



Agencies: 
WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



[LIMITED 



HAMILTON. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



/# 



V* 







"Sunshine" 



Furnace 



The Best known and most suc- 
cessful warm-air, coal and wood 
furnace on the market. 

Made in four sizes and two styles. 

We have many unsolicited letters 
testifying to the success of the 
"Sunshine." 

Write for catalogue and complete 
information. 



Sectioial cut shows Grate Surface, Direct and Gas Dampers, Fire-pot, 



ll-steel Dome, Space between Radiator and Dome, Galvanized 
Casing, with one large Pipe off top, as used in Churches, etc. 



" Famous Magnet" Furnac 

17 styles and sizes. Portable or Brick Settings. 

For the smallest house or largest public building. Has no equafas a wood furnace. 
\ * >r 

Will giVe more heat from the same amount of fuel, anci^requires less attention than 

any other furnace of its kind. 



Full particuj 



and advertising matter supplied free. 






ME McCLARY MANUE 

Head Offices and Works : London, Ont. Foundries: London and 

Branch Warehouses : Toronto, Montreal, 

11 Everything for 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 




"Cornwall" 



Steel Range 

For Coal, Coke or Wood. 



y v» 



Decidedly the most handsome*, 
and best equipped steel range on 
the market. 

Has a rich nickle dress which 
contrasts beautifully with the 
highly polished steel body. 

The most extensively adver- 
tised, and therefore the best 
known steel range in Canada. 



WITH RESERVOIR AND HIGH CLOSET. 



'Famous Active" Range 

Made in six styles and seven sizes. For Coal or Wood. 

Has more good talking points, is better known and therefore a faster seller than any 
of its rivals. 

It would pay you to place a sample of this Range on your floor. 

tCTURING COMPANY 

iamilton, Ont. Tinware Factories: London, and Montreal, P.Q. 

Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 

the Tinshop." 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




LAMP GOODS FOR FALL OF 1902 



'llll l l l llll l I M » MMMMM 

FOR GAS. 

We have something new in our 
Rochester Cluster Gas Light, 

consisting of four incandescent 
gas burners. This light will give 
a greater brilliancy than the 
electric arc light at half the cost. 
It is made for both inside and 
outside lighting, and is unsur- 
passed for use in the store or 
public building. 

We are still agents for the 
famous Leader Incandescent 
Lamps and Mantles. These 
goods are equal to, if not better 
than, any upon the market, and 
we can sell them at manufactur- 
ers' prices. All grades of Man- 
tles kept in stock. 



IMMMMTVTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTVTTTTTTTTTTV 

FOR OIL. 

We have some very dainty and 
beautifully-decorated designs in 
Parlor Lamps suitable for 
Christmas trade. 

The famous Rochester Lamp 

can only be purchased in Canada 
from us. This light needs no 
comment as it is universally 
acknowledged to be far superior 
to any other lamp for public 
buildings or private use. 

We have also a full assortment 
of bedroom, kitchen and general 
purpose lamps, etc. 



IMIMfff*****TV*TWTTTV 




ASK FOR PRICES. WE HAVE EVERYTHING IN LAMP GOODS 

The Rochester Lamp Co. of Canad 

21 Front Street West, Toronto. 




If you want a specially good Axe at a medium price 
as a leader, 



SEND FOR A SAMPLE BOX 




__ ^'^""""'^ This Axe has been 

TESTED and TRIED and 
has PROVED t0 De a special favorite 
with CHOPPERS. 



Give our special " GOLDEN STAR " Cross Cut Saw a trial. 
It will give satisfaction. 
It will be a good leader. 



"5oTofcN 




M» Cut ^ 



4 78 ST. PAUL ST 



When in a hurry 
use our long distance telephone. 

THE SEYBOLD and SONS CO. 

MONTREAL 



77 D'YOUVILLE SQ. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



FAVORITE STOVES and RANGES 





Three Sizes, With and Without Ovens. 




FAVORITE Stoves and Ranges 

are built to suit the 
Canadian trade. 



OUR LINES ARE MODERN 
THE DESIGNS ATTRACTIVE 
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 

Every Stove and Range we make is 
guaranteed to give satisfaction. 



FindlayBros. 

Carleton Place, Ont. 




HORACE WILSON, Winnipeg, 

Agent for MANITOBA and N.W.T. Three Sizw » With and Without 0ve ™. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRIUMPH STEAM HEATER. 

THE accompanying engravings repre- 
sent the "Triumph" steam heater 
manufactured by The Dominion 
Radiator Co., Limited, Toronto. In pre- 
senting this sectional steam heater to the 
trade The Dominion Radiator Co. claim 
that the best construction that can be de- 
vised by competent engineering and me- 
chanical ability has been combined in same, 
and that it will be found to possess more 
practical and desirable features than any 
other boiler now upon the market, and they 
ask a thorough examination with reference 
to construction, economy and capacity. 

The "Triumph" heater is made in 
three series, viz., No. 300, No. 500 and 
No. 700, representing a capacity of from 



need never be dumped to clear out the 
clinkers. Any grate bar can be removed 
through the fire door and another one 
readily substituted. 

Provision is also made for a positive 
interior circulation in each section inde- 
pendently, making it a complete heating 
apparatus in itself, and rendering it impos- 
sible to fluctuate, prime or foam, no matter 
how carelessly the piping of the apparatus 
may be installed. Perfect circulation at 
any pressure is insured by the arrangement 
and size of the water and steam passages. 
The fire box is large and roomy, and the 
large feed door will be found very satisfac- 
tory in operation. The heater has a large 
amount of fire surface, and more effective 
fire travel than is usually found in boilers of 



the flues are so constructed that every inch 
is efficient and all the effective heat of the 
gases is absorbed. 

The construction of the "Triumph" 
heater is absolutely correct from a mechan- 
ical standpoint, adapted for all low pressure 
warming purposes, and possessing every 
improvement and attachment which insures 
absolute safety, perfect reliability, and 
economy in the consumption of fuel. 



DIED OF HEART FAILURE. 

Mr. P. J. Murphy, representative for 
the Fairbanks' Co. in the Maritime Provin- 
ces, died suddenly of heart failure at Lunen- 
burg, N.S., on Tuesday, July 8. 

The deceased gentleman had been con- 
nected for some time with the above firm, 





• I 



2oo to 4,000 sq. ft. when used separately, 
and they can be twined together for larger 
work. 

One of the chief features in the construc- 
tion of this heater is the application of the 
screw joint, which made a world-wide repu- 
tation for the Safford radiator, manufac- 
tured by the same company. The sections 
are made of the best cast iron, and are 
connected to cast iron drums by wrought 
iron nipples. The construction is such that 
it admits of 90 per cent, direct fire surface, 
and only-enough flue surface to absorb the 
heat from the waste gases and smoke 
before passing off into the chimney. 

Special attention is also directed to the 
rocking grate which is shaken by a lever, 
and can be operated with perfect ease. All 
ashes and clinkers are ground up and 
removed from the fire, so that the grate 



this construction, and it will also operate 
successfullyWith either coal or wood. 

The manufacturers claim that the 
"Triumph" is ihe only boiler made for 
house heating whicn\dds flue surface and 
fire surface in exact proportion to grate sur- 
face, when the size of the boiler is increased. 
The gases and particles of combustion 
pass from the rear to the front of theSfcoiler TIMELY HARDWARE TOPICS. 

through the lower tier of flues, and then «to The Hardware Section of the Toronto 

the rear through the upper tier, thus suffi-^SBranch of the Retail Merchants' Association 
ciently heating every part of each section. oPeanada held a meeting in their rooms 

on Bay*St«Mt, Toronto, on Thursday even- 
ing, July nSw.and selected a number of 



and was one of the most valued members of 
the travelling staff. Mr. Murphy had not 
been feeling quite himself for some days, 
and had been under the doctor's care. 

Immediately upon the receipt of the news 
at the Montreal office, Mr. John E. Botterell 
left for Lunenburg to bring the remains back 
to Orillia. Mr. Murphy leaves an aged 
mother, three brothers and one sister. 



Then they are carried by means of a smoke 
box, bolted on the back down to the bottom 
of the boiler, and thence to the smoke pipe 
connection. The value and economy of 
the down draft principle will be readily 
appreciated. The hot gases impinging 
upon all the surfaces -add greatly to the 
available heating power of the boiler, and 



topics for discuHion at the convention of 
the Association toN|jj» held in Toronto, 
September 9 and 10. sftwteof these sub- 
jects will be : " What ProIhV Shall the 
Retailer Place on His Goods ? '^ " What 
Percentage Shall be Added to the Cost to 
Cover Expense?" and "The Unsatisfac- 
tory Condition of the Graniteware Business." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



SHEET METAL WORKING TOOLS. 




No. 23 -INSIDE CUTTING SHEARS, with Reversible Knives. 



BROWN, BOGGS & CO., HAMILTON, ONT. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO.'S PICNIC. 



THERE is a tradition that when the 
annual excursion of The Gurney 
Foundry Co., Limited, is held the 
Fates always smile upon it, and that the 
Weather Clerk is always generous. At any 
rate, good weather is commonly known as 
"Gurney weather" around the establish- 
ment of The Gurney Foundry Co. 

On Friday, July u, the company's annual 
excursion was held to Niagara Falls, and 
the weather was of the "Gurney" brand, 
sure enough. There was just sufficient 
ripple on Lake Ontario to make the water 
dance and glisten in the sunshine, and the 
air was balmy and bracing. It was, in 
fact, an ideal day for an excursion of the 
kind. 

The steamer Garden City had nearly 700 
people on board when she left the Yonge 
street wharf shortly after 8 o'clock. These 
were all made up of the members of the 
firm, its employes and their friends. Mr. 
Edward Gurney was on board and took a 
fatherly interest in everything and every- 
body. And as he had given even more 
supervision of the arrangements for the 
excursion his concern for the welfare of his 
employes and their friends was even keener 
than usual. He had able lieutenants in his 
son, Mr. Cromwell Gurney, and Mr. T. B. 
Alcock, the secretary of the company, to 
say nothing of the heads of the various 
departments. ^^s, 

The excursionists were landed at f\r* 
Dalhousie after a pleasant sail of two hours 
and a half. There electric cars were in 
waiting and the Falls were reached about 
noon, after a most delightful ride through 
that part of the country which is so famous 
for its orchards and gardens and its historical 
recollections. 

Luncheon over, the excursionists were 
soon scattered abroad visiting the many 
points of interest which are to be found at 
the famous resort. The homeward journey 
began at 5.30 p.m., and Toronto was 
reached shortly after 9.30 o'clock. 

Everybody voted that it was the most 
successful of the many excursions the 
Gurney Company have held. And when 
the boat touched the whaif the excursionists 
expressed their satsifaction by crowding 
around Mr. Gurney and singing " He's a 
Jolly Good Fellow," and finishing up with 
loud and prolonged cheers. 



factories at St. Petersburg, Russia ; Arling- 
ton, N.J., as well as St. Louis, and is now 
recognizing the importance of the Canadian 
trade. 

Mr. George Morrisette, a well-known 
hardwareman, of Three Rivers, Que., paid 
a business visit to Toronto this week and 
was registered at the Queen's. 

Messrs. S. R. Kennedy, Chas. Small- 
piece, W. R. Tait and M. Morrell, western 
representatives of Lewis Bros. & Co., are 
spending a few days in Montreal. 

Mr. J. D. H. Brown, of Moore & Brown, 
hardware dealers, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., 
has been visiting in Toronto and London 
during the past week, attending the funeral 
of his father.in-law at the latter city. 

Mr. Wm. Vallance, of Wood, Vallance 
& Co., wholesale hardware merchants, 
Hamilton, Ont., has left for the Old 
Country on a business trip. He is not 
expected back until about September. 

Mr. Briggs, of The Hart Emery Wheel 
Co., Limited, Hamilton, is to take up his 
residence in London, Eng., where he will 
manage the branch of their business, which 
has grown much beyond expectations. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. E. C. S. Hunt, of The Hoyt Metal 
Co., of St. Louis, Mo., was in Toronto on 
July 12 making arrangements for the erec- 
tion of a factory. The company has already 



THE CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS' 
ASSOCIATION. 

AT the annual meeting of the Cana- 
dian Manufacturers' Association, 
Toronto branch, July 15, it was 
shown that the branch had achieved all the 
ends aimed at except the attempt to get the 
cityv^cAncil to pay the estimates of the 
Techrrreal School Board in full. The manu- 
facturers^d^scussed a scheme to educate 
Canadftrds t*. the importance of using goods 
" made in Ca**&la.V 

Thevreport of the retiring chairman, Mr. 
J. O. T.horn, showed* that the Toronto 
branch had increased to 272 members and 
had during 'the year dealt with questions 
which included the Royal arch, Technical 
School representation, inspection of eleva- 
tors, Exhibition buildings, beautifying the 
city, exemptions on plarit^ electric power 
from Niagara, Temiscamingue Railway and 
removal of garbage from factories; v 

The chairman viewed with regret the 
dilatory and unbusinesslike action of the 
authorities having in hand the new Exhibi- 
tion buildings. 

The most important part of the report of 
the representatives on the Technical School 
Board, presented by Mr. A. W. Thomas, 
in the absence of Mr. Harold Van der 
Linde, was that referring to the lack of 
knowledge of the most elementary subjects 
in pupils coming to the Technical School. 



The report on education also stated in 
part : 

" At present there is no kind of coopera- 
tion between the Public and High Schools, 
on the one hand, and the Toronto Technical 
School on the other. It appears to your 
representatives that a rational scheme for 
the amalgamation of the educational boards 
of the city is worthy your best consideration. 
It appears to be only an ordinary common- 
sense business proposition that the conduct 
of these three grades of schools by one board 
instead of three would not only conduce to 
continuity, which is a prime necessity in 
education, but would also greatly increase 
the efficiency of the schools regarded as 
working machines, and might also effect 
great economies both in cash and energy." 

The action of the city council in cutting 
down the grant to the school 25 per cent, 
met with severe criticism. 

The election ol officers resulted as follows. 

Chairman, W. P. Gundy. W. J. Gage & 
Co.; vice-chairman, C. N. Candee, Gutta 
Percha and Rubber Co. 

Executive Committee — R.J. Christie, 
Christie, Brown & Co ; J. H. Paterson, 
Toronto Hardware Manufacturing Co.; J. 
T. Sheridan, Pease Furnace Co.; D. T. 
Mcintosh, Mcintosh Granite and Marble 
Co.; Robert Crean, Robert Crean & Co.; 
F. B. Fetherstonhaugh, F. B. Fetherston- 
haugh & Co. ; J P. Murray, Toronto Carpet 
Manufacturing Co.; Wm. Stone, Toronto 
Lithographing Co. ; J. H. Housser, Massey- 
Harris Co.; A.W.Thomas, Copp, Clark Co. 

Past presidents of the Association and 
past chairmen of the local branch are also 
members ex-officio. 

Representatives to the Techinal School 
Board— Harold Van der Linde, A. W. 
Thomas, Gerhard Heintzman, F. J. Small. 

Representatives on Industrial Exhibition 
Board, to be elected at Halifax — W. K. 
Mc Naught, W. K. George, Gjorge Booth, 
J. O. Thorn, H. G. Nicholls, J. R. Shaw, 
W. B. Rogers, T. C. Moffatt. jr., J. T. 
Sheridan, T. A. Russell, R. B. Andrew and 
F. Stanley. 

The following were nominated for mem- 
bers of the council of the Canadian Manu- 
facturers' Association to be balloted for at 
the annual meeting at Halifax — J. P. 
Murray. Wm. Stone, J. O. Thorn, R. J. 
Christie, J. H. Housser, T. A. Russell, 
C. N. Candee, W. P. Gundy, Frederic 
Nisjjolls, S. M. Wickett, Thomas Roden, 
J. H. "Paterson, A. W. Thomas, Geo. H. 
Hees, P. H. Burton, Gerhard Heintzman, 
R. Millichamp, Frederick A R.itchie. 

SITUATION WANTED. ~ 

EXPERIENCED YOUNG MAN, STRICTLY 
temperate, desire* position with Hardware or Sport- 
ins Goods house. Boy 95, Hakdware and Metal, 
Toronto. ( 2 ?) 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 







MBtf^yfr 



Thoroughly Reliable. 




These two words state briefly 
our claim in regard to the 



Pease "Economy 



>> 



line of Heating Apparatus. The full measure of this claim has been proved by the 
testimony of many years of eminently successful results. 

The "Economy" line of Heaters covers the whole range of heating requirements 
as does no other line. Every improvement that ingenuity can suggest or experience 
has evolved has been embodied in them. .They are to-day the Standard of Excellence 
in high-grade Heating Apparatus. 

No dealer who has taken the agency for these Heaters has ever been known to 
regret his choice, or has failed to satisfy his customers. First-class Heaters will not 
only increase your profits, but will also bring you profitable business in other lines. 

We have unexcelled facilities for making prompt shipments, and we are sure that 
we can help you to increase your business. 

Why not write for prices to-day ? 




J. F. Pease Furnace Co,, ysM 



HEATING AND VENTILATING 
ENGINEERS, 



189-193 QUEEN ST. E. 

TORONTO 




28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

THE creditors of Gorman & McDonnell, 
general merchants, Douglas, Ont., 
held a meeting on July 15. 

Omer Beaulieu, general merchant, New 
Carlisle, Que., has assigned. 

Goulet & Co., sawmillers, etc., Shawene- 
gan Falls, Que., have assigned. 

A. H. Pare, general merchant, Point De 
Maskinonge, Que., has assigned. 

The Dominion Sporting Goods Co., 
Montreal, has filed an assignment. 

A sheriff is in possession of the premises 
of J. T. Orr, tinware dealer, Victoria, B.C. 

V. E. Paradis has been appointed curator 
of A. Cloutier, general merchant, St.Fabien, 
Que. 

R. T. Stone & Co., general merchants, 
Melancthon, Ont., have assigned to Wm. 
Gray. 

Riordan Bros., traders. Montreal, have 
filed an assignment, and their creditors met 
on July 17. 

P. Boucher, general merchant, St. 
Damase, Que., has compromised at 55c. on 
the dollar, cash. 

The creditors of George Scully, harness- 
maker, Jngersoll, Ont., had a meeting on 
July 15 ; they meet again on July 22. 

Achille Gagnon & Co., manufacturers of 
electric light, tinners, etc., Victoriaville, 
Que., have as their curator Alex. Des- 
marteau. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Fieldman & Milmet, hardware and furni- 
ture dealers, Winnipeg, have admitted as 
partner F. Huffman. 

H. Lovell & Sons, lumber merchants and 
sawmillers, Coaticook, Que., have dissolved, 
and a new partnership has been registered. 

Johnston & Stewart, manufacturers' 
agents, Winnipeg, have dissolved ; W. 
Johnston continues with L. J. Ostrander 
under the style of W. Johnston & Co. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The assets of A. Prevost & Co., general 
merchant, St. Agathe Des Monts, Que., 
have been sold. 

There will be a sheriff's sale of the pro- 
perty of G. F. Fenton, grocer, etc., Hali- 
fax, N.S., on July 29. 

The stock of (the estate of) Wm. Coxall. 
hardware merchant, grocer and dry goods 
dealer, Colborne, Ont., is advertised for 
sale by tender. 

CHANGES. 

Echenberg Bros, junk dealers, Sher- 
brooke. Que. , have registered . 

J.Henry, harnessmaker, etc., Vancouver, 
is succeeded by Carl & Glover. 

Ringwood & Wilson, lumber merchants, 
Lenore, Man., are commencing. 



A. Desmarais & Fils, tanners, St. Joseph 
De St. Hyacinthe. Que., have registered. 

Woodley & Sharpe, lumber merchants, 
Moose Jaw, N.W.T., have opened a branch 
at Caron. 

The book debts of Smith & Lariviere, 
lumber merchants, St. Anne Du Sault, Que., 
have been sold. 

FIRES. 

Thomas Craig, blacksmith.. Extension, 
B.C., has sustained loss by fire. 

E. B. Salyerds, manufacturer of brushes, 
Preston, Ont., was burned out ; insured. 

John Hallam, hides and wool merchant, 
Toronto, has sustained damage by fire and 
water ; insured. 

DEATHS. 

D. C. Corbitt, of D. C. Corbitt & Son, 
general merchants, Didsbury, N.W.T., is 
dead. 

James P. Mitchell, of J. P. Mitchell & 
Co., general and lumber merchants, Mill 
Village, N.S., is dead. 



NEW ADVERTISING NOVELTIES. 

Some attractive advertising is now circu 
lated in Canada by the "Globe" metal 
polish people, Raimes & Co., of No. 164 
Duane street. New York. Their goods have 
a large sale throughout the world. It is put 
up in attractive tins, and the popular sizes 
for retailers are the 5 and 10c. tins. It will 
keep good in any climate, is always clean 
to handle, and is a remarkably good seller 
when once introduced. This polish has met 
with a large sale here during the short time 
it has been on the Canadian market, and 
the company are glad to forward a supply 
of advertising matter to all retailers on 
application. 



PAINT FACTORY BURNED. 

The paint factory established in a build- 
ing on Wellington street, Montreal, by 
Henderson & Potts, proprietors of The Nova 
Scotia Paint Works, was destroyed by fire 
on Friday morning, Julyn, to the extent 
of $2 5,000, which, however, was fully 
covered by insurance. 

It is thought that the fire was due to 
spontaneous combustion, occurring in the 
department where the putty was manufac- 
tured. On this floor were stored dry powders 
and other materials for mixing paints. A 
certain quantity of oil was also placed here, 
though the big tanks were in the, celler, 
which, fortunitely the fire did not reach. 
The fire worked up through the various 
floors, and finally broke out on the roof, 
and being fed by the oils and paints threat- 
ened to spread to the other buildings, of 
which there are a number in the district. 

After half an hour's hard work the fire- 
men succeeded in getting the flames under 



control. The firm are insured for the fol- 
lowing amounts, in the companies named : 

Liverpool and London and Globe $5, 000 

National 5,000 

Northern 5.000 

Western 5. 000 

Royal 2.500 

British America 2,500 

Caledonia 2,500 

Guardian s.soo 

^Etna 2,^-0 

Hartford 2,500 

Phcenix of Haitford 2,000 

Norwich Union 1,000 

Total $38,000 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY TO BE BUILT. 

An electric railway may shortly be built 
between Windsor and St. Thomas. An 
American civil engineer is inspecting the 
topography of the country for a syndicate. 
It is proposed to have the line parallel the 
system of the Michigan Central and the 
Lake Erie & Detroit Railway, through a 
rich and populous district, the residents of 
which have now to haul their produce a 
long way to the railway stations. Just who 
is behind the movement for the new road 
the civil engineer refuses to say. 



We import and 
manufacture 
every description 
of 

Window and 
Fancy Glass. 

Write for our 
new Catalogue. 



Hobbs Manufacturing Co. 




LONDON, CANADA. 



Limited 




A minute or two and your shave 13 through. The "New 
Gem' ,-a f ety Razor i c guaranteed to always shave- any 
growth of b aid. Catalogues mailttl free b*m these 
C'.nadiati az-nts: Montreal Caverhil', Learmont & 
Co.; Quebec-Cbinic Hardware Co.: Berlin .Inn 
Fennell & Son; Hamilton -Wood, Vallanee &Co.; St. 
John, N.B.-Kerr & Robertson; Halifax, N.S.— A 
M. Bell & Cn.; Winnipeg, Man.— J H. Ashdown 
Hardware Co .; Vancouver, B.C. -McLennan, McFeeljr 
SCO.; Victoria, B.C.-M. & a. A. Fo ; or direct from 
maker , The Gem Cutlery Co. 34 K(ade St., N. 
Y.C. ; 9 London St., K.U., London; 9 Piclhuben St., 
Hamburg, Germany. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



28a 



Wheeler & Bain, Toronto 



-MANUFACTURERS OF- 



»ov^ 2 " SUCCESS " ^ 

HOT-AIR FURNACES ^ 

The most durable, economical and best 
heaters made anywhere. 




i^vwwwwwwwwwx^wwwvwwwx 

FARMERS' FEED BOILERS 

50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 gallons capacity. 

It will boil 150 gallons of feed 
in 30 minutes. 

■WWWWWWWWWI-VWVWWVWVWV* 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 




Galvanized 



Iron Eavetroughs, Corrugated Galvanized Sheets, 
and Corrugated Conductor Pipes. 



SHEET METAL WORKING TOOLS 



OF - ANY DESCRIPTION 



Canners' Processing and Can-Making 

Machinery. 

Evaporating Machinery. 

"D. C" and "A. C." Arc Lamps and 
Riggings, etc., etc. 



Hanufactured by. 



BROWN, BOGGS & CO., H flM, c L ™;» 

1902 CATALOGUE JUST OUT. HAVE YOU RECEIVED ONE ? 



28b 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




STOVES J 9 



TRADE MARK. 

INTERCHANGEABLE FIREBOX 



For 
ALL 

V / 



^ 



« 



^V 

3 



Gypsy - 

(Crown Jewel 



Ranges 
Gypsy Jewel 

4 -hole Stove Range 

ALL STEEL 



Made in 6 Styles, with 
either Leg Base or Cabinet 
Base (as shown), fitted with 
DUPLEX Grate for 

Coal, or for Wood, as shown 
above. 

Oven, 18x20x13 inches. 




THE LATEST 

ALL STEEL 

constructions, 

embodying every 

desirable and 



will burn Wood 26 inches in length. 



Thoroughly Tested 

FEATURE 



^ V%OTE SIZE OF THIS TOP 




RETORT 

Will BURN COAL 1 





MANUFACTURED only by 



TESTING Hi 



m BURROW, STCWAi! 



TRADE MARK. 



HamiltoT 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 28c 

.,■.■,■ ft\W ; 



32 RANGES 



MADE IN 



4 SIZES 



12-inch FIREPOT 
14 " 
16 " 
18 " 





NOTE THE SWINGING KEY PLATE, 
Advantageous for BROILING, TOASTING, ETC. 



EL HEATER 

d or soft), or Coke. 





1 • 

J. 




OF OVEN. 



FITTED with DUPLEX GRATE for Coal Burning, 
or the Interchangeable FIREBOX for Wood. 



r, MILNE Combany, 

i Canada 



LIMITED 



TRADE MARK. 



Crown 
Jewel 
Range 

ALL STEEL 

Made in 3 sizes 

12 STYLES 

with Leg Base or Cabi- 
net Base as shown. 

6 HOLES 

INJos. 8.18 
8.20 
9.20 

Sizes of OVENS: 

18 x 20 x 13 inches 
20 x 20 x 13 inches 

WITH or WITHOUT 

THERMOMETER 




TRADE MARK. 



28d 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware and Metal 



President: 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES. 
Montreal - 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

Toronto - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

London, Eng. - - 109 Fleet Street, E.C. 

W. H, Miln. 
Manchester, Eng. - - 18 St. Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 
Winnipeg - Western Canada Block. 

J. J. Roberts. 
Vancouver, B C. - Flack Block. 

J. A. Macdonald. 
St John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
New York - Room 443 New York Life Bldg. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 

,_. . , ... I Adscript, London. 

Cable Address j Adscri ^ t| Canada. 



•WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



Vol. XIV. Montreal and Toronto, July 19, 1902. No. 29. 

FEATURES OF THE COPPER 
MARKET. 

O QUITE a little interest is being 
taken in the copper market these 
days. This is due largely to the 
fact that there is a good deal of speculation 
as to the future. The market, while dull, 
is fairly steady as to price. 

One of the principal features of the market 
is the large increase in the exports of copper 
from the United States. During the month 
of June they were 14.027 tons against 
9,842 for the same month a year ago. For 
the six months the exports from the United 
States aggregated 97.960 tons compared 
with 50,027 tons, during the same peiiod in 
1 90 1. This shows an increase ot 95 per 
cent. The production, on the other hand, 
according to the latest figures, also shows an 
increase, the quantity in the United States 
and other countries being 24.942 tons in 
June, compared with 30,923 tons the same 
month a year ago. The production for the 
six months was 192,984 tons, an increase 
of 8 per cent., compared with the same 
period last year. It is perhaps worthy of 



note that the increase in the stock of copper 
last year amounted to nearly 70,000 tons. 

While the market is quiet at the moment 
the consumption is comparatively large. In 
the United States it is exceedingly so, and 
on this account a steady upward movement 
is eventually anticipated. At present the 
coal miners' strike is somewhat of a dis- 
turbing element on account of the threat- 
ened scarcity of coal, and particularly far 
the mines on Lake Superior. Besides 
this, there is undoubtedly two opposing 
parties contending for the control of the 
market in the United States, and this is 
naturally giving some uncertainty to the 
situation. 



that the opposition from such an important 
body as the International Union has been 
discontinued. It will certainly be more 
satisfactory to the men themselves, to say 
nothing of the interests of their employers. 



MOULDING MACHINES AND THE 
UNION. 

ONE of the most important items of 
business transacted by the Inter- 
national Iron Moulders' Union, 
which has been in session in Toronto during 
the past two weeks, was that in regard to 
moulding machines. As our readers are 
doubtless aware, the union has hitherto set 
its face against these machines, notwith- 
standing the light of history showing the 
futility of such action. 

The first inkling of the turn in the tide 
in the attitude of the union was given early 
last week when the president said it was 
time the union men withdrew their opposi- 
tion to these machines. These remarks of 
the president were afterwards considered by 
a committee, and on Wednesday last a 
report was submitted to the Convention 
dealing with this question. The report 
recommended that it be an instruction to 
the incoming officers to proceed to organize 
wherever possible all competent machine 
operators, radiator moulders, and all other 
classified specialist moulders, granting 
them a separate charter or affiliating them 
with local unions already in existence. The 
report was adopted by a large majority. 

It is evident that what brought the union 
around to its present attitude was more a 
sense of self preservation than a lessening 
in the opposition to the machines, realizing 
that in their opposition to the machines 
they were creating a strong and dangerous 
opposition to their own welfare among the 
men who operate the machines. 

It is, however, a matter for congratulation 



THE STEEL TRUST'S FINANCES- I 

THE suit which has been brought in the 
United States against the Steel Cor- 
poration to prevent the proposed 
$200,000,000 bond conversion, has brought 
out information which enables one to gain 
a clearer idea of the financial strength of 
this, the greatest of all commercial organi- 
zations. The information comes through 
an answer which President Schwab has 
filed in the suit in question. 

The plaintiffs in the case claim that the 
corporation's assets do not equal the amount 
of its preferred stock. 

In his answer President Schwab says 
that the assets will amount to more than 
the entire stock, bonds, common and pre- 
ferred, or more than $1,400,000,000, while 
the earnings for the fiscal year he places at 
the enormous sum of $140,000,000. 



THREATENED TINPLATE STRIKE. 

There is some danger that the amicable 
relations which have existed for some time 
between the tinplate mills in Wales and 
their employes will be broken on account 
of the question of wages. 

The men demand that in "Canadas" 
all plates up to 29 gauge shall be paid for 
on the basis of 112 lb., and those on and 
above 30 gauge on the area of 31,500. The 
employers at a recent meeting accepted 
the suggestion as to "Canadas," but re- 
fused to entertain the other proposals. 

In addition to these, there are a number of 
other points at issue. A rather ill advised 
action on the part of the men has not at all 
helped matters. Some three years ago a 
conciliation board was formed whereby the 
question of wages was dealt with annually. 
This conciliation board appears to have 
worked well up to the present, but recently 
the men of one of the mills presented 
notices for an increase in wages without 
having consulted the board, which was 
contrary to custom. 

The Welsh tinplate industry has had so 
many ups and downs during the last few 
years that it is to be hoped the present 
difficulty will not result in an open rupture. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



BUSINESS MEN AND THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



AT the annual meeting of the Toronto 
branch of the Canadian Manufac- 
turers' Association, on Tuesday 
last, the subject of writing, arithmetic and 
* spelling in the public schools of Toronto 
came in for discussion. The subject was 
introduced by one of the reports, which 
adversely criticized the public school system 
in these particulars. 

This is not a new question to the busi- 
ness men of Toronto. For a long time it 
has been recognized that the pupils from 
the public schools were decidedly inefficient 
in the three essentials to education. 

Wholesale men have time and again 
informed us that they could very rarely 
secure a boy from the public schools who 
was proficient enough, particularly in 
writing, to be taken into the office. It is 
evident, therefore, that the Manufacturers' 
Association has not taken the subject in 
hand any too soon, and it is to be hoped 
that good results will soon be apparent. 
The trouble appears to be not really the 
inefficiency of the teachers, but the system, 
which endeavors to crowd too much into the 
young minds of pupils. If the real purpose 
of the public school system is anything, it is 
to ground children in such essentials as 
writing, reading and arithmetic, but, as 
conditions exist to-day, these are not 
obtained. The pupils are given a smatter- 
ing of many subjects, but are really pro- 
ficient in none. 

A good many, tired of this condition of 
affairs, are sending their children to 
voluntary schools, over which they have 
more direct control and in which the essen- 
tials to education are more thoroughly 
taught. While these voluntary schools are 
increasing, our public school population is, 
on the other hand, decreasing. This is 
shown by the Government returns. 

But it is the few and not the many who 
* can afford to send their children to the 
voluntary schools. And it is obvious that 
those who cannot are compelled to send 
their offsprings out into the world lacking 
in those qualifications which are so essential 
to success in life. 

In Toronto one fourth of the ordinary 
tax rate is on public school account. It is 
obvious, therefore, with this high propor- 



tion, that inefficiency is being bought at a 
pretty high price. 

It is time that business men took a more 
practical and live interest in the public 
school affairs, and it is to be hoped the 
action of the Canadian Manufacturers' 
Association will induce them to do so. 



SUPREMACY IN THE IRON 
INDUSTRY. 

THE Board of Commissioners sent to 
the United States last year by the 
British Iron Trade Association has 
just issued its report. This statement of 
opinion from British manufacturers has 
been awaited with great interest, especially 
because of the enormous increase in the 
production of United States iron and steel, 
which has been going on contemporaneously 
with a decrease in the output of both the 
British and German iron industries. A few 
figures will sufficiently demonstrate this 
condition of the rival nations. 

Pig iron was produced in Britain to the 
amount of 7,761,830 gross tons in 1901, 
a decrease of 1,197.861 tons compared 
with the production of the preceding year. 
Bessemer steel ingots showed a loss of 
138,751 tons over the same period, while 
open-hearth steel ingots alone witnessed an 
increase of 141,741 tons over the 3,156,050 
tons produced in 1900. German reports on 
the production of pig-iron show a decrease 
from 8,520,541 metric tons in 1900 to 
7,860,893 metric tons in 1901. Steel 
ingots and castings witnessed a loss of 
251,647 tons, from the 6,645,869 tons of 
1900. The combined output of pig iron of 
the two countries falls 379,861 tons short of 
the 15,878,354 tons produced by the United 
States in 1901. 

United States statistics covering the ten 
years from 1890 to 1900 bear witness to an 
enormous increase in every line of iron and 
steel production. The capital vested in the 
industries was only 5405,771,786 in 1890. 
In 1900 it had reached nearly $600,000,000. 
But it must be remembered that the present 
steel combine had not then been formed. 
Its capital alone stands at a billion dollars. 
The value of the products has increased 
during the 10 years by over 74 per cent., 
and in 1900 it stood at $835,759,034. The 



number of blast furnaces and forges both 
show decreases, but in the case of the 
former the value of the product witnesses a 
decided increase. Rolling mills and steel 
works have increased in number from 395 
438, and capital and production have 
almost doubled. A notable increase is to 
be found in the iron and steel shipbuilding 
industry. Only 17 institutions were in 
operation in 1890, compared with 44 in 1900. 
A capital of slightly over $7,000,000 has 
been raised to $60 000,000, and the value 
of the product has been increased by nearly 
290 per cent, over its value of $12,929 953 
in 1890. 

These are wonderful figures to be con- 
fronted vith, but the British commission's 
report is optimistic. The gist of it is that, 
while it recognizes the great advances in 
the United States, it yet believes that the 
remedy for the ills of the British iron industry 
lies with the British manufacturers them- 
selves. That is, United States supremacy 
will only be inevitable if they fail to take 
immediate advantage of the modern pro- 
cesses which will enable them to keep up 
an effective competition. 



GOOD OUTLOOK FOR STOVE TRADE 

The Gurney Foundry Co , Limited, is so 
well represented through Canada and by its 
corresponding company in the United States 
that it is perhaps as well qualified to speak 
of the present status of business as any con- 
cern in Canada. Its officers speak in 
qualified terms of the present and future cf 
business in Canada and the United States. 
They seem to hold the opinion that there is 
a prospect of good times lasting longer in 
Canada than the United States, as, although 
in the past, conditions here have been 
dependent on the United States, there are 
at present relations in Canada which did 
not exist before this year. The enormous 
emigration from the United States into 
Canada is spoken of as one of these factors, 
while the growth in Canada of Clergue and 
Sydney enterprises suggests another factor. 

The Gurney Company contemplate build- 
ing immediately another foundry with double 
the output of the present one. Toronto 
Junction has been chosen as the site, and 
seven or eight acres will be required for the 
purpose. The building will be of the most 
modern foundry construction, the idea being 
to move heavy material and goods by 
machinery, and all upon one level. The 
officers of the company feel sure that for 
the next three or four years the demand will 
meet the supply in all branches of manu- 
facture. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



* 



THE PREFERENTIAL TARIFF QUESTION. 

By ROBERT MUNRO, President of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association. 






THERE is much more general agree- 
ment on this subject than we are 
apt 'to infer from the varied opin- 
ions expressed in its discussion. 
It is no question of party politics. There 
can be no doubt that the people of Canada, 
as a whole, are favorable to giving British 
possessions every tariff advantage that is 
possible, consistent with our general 
financial system and the maintenance of our 
industries. 

There is a remnant of our people who 
would refuse to consider our industries in 
the question at all. These do not consider 
that the investment of Canadian capital in 
manufacturing industries amounts to pro- 
bably $500,000,000, and that at least one- 
third ot our population is dependent on 
these. There is also a further consideration. 
These industries were largely induced by the 
measure of protection the tariff incidentally 
afforded, and, as a community, we cannot 
afford to so alter our fiscal conditions as to 
prevent this enormous investment yielding 
some return, nor can we afford to materially 
reduce the number for which these indus- 
tries find employment. 

The Pro-British view ot the tariff looks 
to increased trade between Canada and 
other British possessions. Of this view 
Canada is the author. Its development will 
probably be intercolonial before it becomes 
Imperial. We may expect a return of pre- 
ferences from the other colonies before 
reciprocal preferential trade is adopted by 
Great Britain. Our fellow-Britons in Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, South Africa, West 
Indies, etc., are thinking hard on the ques- 
tion. We may surely arrange to help out 
the discussion with them in detail, and it 
cannot prove fruitjess. A general agree- 
ment among the colonies is the great lever 
which will move Great Britain. This inter- 
colonial agreement is just what many of 
our British people would delight to see in 
operation. The discussion of the principle 
will help to bring the financial systems of 
the colonies into similar lines, and as one 
colony gradually increases its consumption 
of the products of the other, the preferen- 



tial tariff will be a matter of less and less 
difficulty. 

But the Pro-British view has another 
very important feature. It seeks to retain 
British trade for Britons. In carrying out 
this view it has no favors to confer on 
foreign nations. , Nor has it any prejudice 
against dealing with them on a fair "tariff 
for tariff" basis. While one part of our 
creed is to give a preference to British pos- 
sessions, another is to give to every other 
country as fair terms as they give us, but 
we object to 'give more than this. If they 
tax our farm products and our manufac- 
tures we also tax theirs. We want to trade 
with the wide world on a business basis. 
We want to trade with our fellow Britons 
on a preferential basis, and we expect them 
to recognize us as Britons also. 

This view is worthy of Canada. There 
is nothing in it that is not businesslike, 
straightforward, fair and just. 

Now, what would be the outcome of this 
Pro-British policy if carried out from these 
two viewpoints ? 

Based on the existing tariffs of Germany, 
United States and other countries, the prin- 
ciple of tariff for tariff would so restrict our 
trade with these countries that a large 
additional volume of trade would be avail- 
able between us and Great Britain and her 
colonies. One effect would be a higher 
Canadian tariff on a large number of items, 
which is not, in itself, desirable, but it would 
be necessary to.equalize- with foreign tariffs. 
The other effects would be that not only 
would a larger amount of trade be available 
between us and Britain, but that a greater 
percentage of preference could be given to 
Britain. 

I am not forgetful that some few indus- 
tries have suffered severely from the prefer- 
ence now given. These industries were 
established on a tariff which appeared to 
offer a return on their investment, but the 
abatement of one-third upset their calcula- 
tions, and in some cases changed profit into 
loss. These are the exception, however, 
and call to be dealt with exceptionally, but 
generally the increased aggregate business 



that would result from fair trade with 
foreign nations and the special increases 
incident thereto would adjust matters. I 
have tried to deal with principles. Let tne 
give only one illustration in detail. 

Our agriculturists are very heavy 
sufferers in this regard. There is approxi- 
mately $20,000,000 lost to Canada every 
year to pay United States farmers for 
produce for which they will not take 
produce in return, but are paid in gold. 
Every dollar of this is lost to our Canadian 
farmers. 

The pro-British principle of "tariff for 
tariff" to foreigners and reciprocal prefer- 
ential between British possessions is the 
principle that will do justice to Canada and 
her people. ,. 



SCHOOL OF MINES FOR NOVA 
SCOTIA. 

Under a recent date Mr. R. Drum- 
mond, M.L.C., of The Maritime Mining 
Record, writes : " The Province is now- 
ripe and ready for a school of mines or 
some such institution which will supply 
the hundreds of young men and middle 
aged — who have secured certificates of 
competency as managers, underground 
managerSj and overseers at the excellent 
schools of their kind' — established by the 
local Government, more advanced tech 
nical instruction than conies within the 
scope properly of the schools now estab 
lished. Many mining men recognize that 
the time has come when the instruction 
given at our mining schools must be sup 
piemented by something higher if our 
young men who have chosen mining as 
a profession are to hold their own with 
the men of Germany or the United 
States. Those interested in mining pur- 
suits and the development of the vast 
mineral wealth of this Province, are, 1 

am inclined to believe, desirous that- a 

school of mines lie established. 

" If the school is to lie for all the per® 
pie, and not a favored section, some 
scheme should lie hinted at whereby purl. 
at least, of the expense of at tendance in 
Halifax lie remitted or, as in the case 
of the Agricultural School, pupils should, 
in some way, be given opportunity to 
earn their board. 1 have also an idea 
that every candidate who secures a certi- 
ficate as manager from the mining exam 
iners, should have his expenses in Hah 
fax paid call it a scholarship. The Gov- 
ernment ought to provide these scholar 
ships or bursaries." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



r 



■** 




MIDSUMMER 
*> 1902 .* 



To -the 



Hardware Trade : 



The index of our business barometer has for the last five months pointed to STEADY 
PRESSURE. 

The volume of business done is unprecedented in the history of our Company, and we 
desire to thank our clients most heartily for their increased support. 

We have all felt the growing time. Our belief is that Canada will have a long lease 
of it, and our factory arrangements will be based on this belief. 

Our 1902 Specialties have been found just what were wanted. 

For the Summer and Fall trade we have made arrangements to increase the supply 
of PAINTERS' PERFECT WHITE LEAD, which has had an excellent run ever since 
its introduction. 

The MAGNETIC OIL sold fister than we could tank and strain it, but from this for- 
ward there will not be any complaints of shortage. It has become a favorite in all parts 
of the Dominion. 

Our PERMANENT REDS are prepared from first to last in our own factory — no 
middle profit is given away — we are that much ahead of all competitors. You are buying 
from first hands. 

Our VARNISH DEPARTMENT grows most rapidly, partly from the expansion in 
other manufacturing industries. Our test system gives absolute security, and we guarantee 
every sealed can bearing our name. 

You must all have been pleased and helped by our 1902 Catalogue. We commend 
its continued study as an educator. The men who are expert in our business study it most. 



Yours, very truly, 

e CANADA PAINT COMPANY, limited 



TH 



Montreal, Canada. 



Robt. Munro, Managing Director. 



U 



.*$ 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July IS. 1002. 
HARDWARE. 

A GOOD demand during the past, 
week has been experienced for 
the general list of hardware 
articles, this trade being less affected by 
the change in seasons, and in weather, 
than is usually the case, and much less 
than in other classes of trade. All build 
ing materials and harvest tools have 
been moving briskly. Common wrenches, 
it is expected, will be advanced in price 
within the next few days, owing to the 
scarcity of the raw material, which has 
been making itself felt more keenly dur- 
ing the past week or so. Curry combs 
have been advanced H> per cent., and are 
now from 30 and 10 per cent, to 35 per 
cent. off. 

SCYTHES.' — In this line the business 
done during the past season has been 
remarkably good, and at the present 
then; is still a brisk movement. Priced 
have not been altered. Quotations are as 
follows : Lance, No. 80, 85.50 ; Hurd's 
Clipper, §0.50 ; concave, $7.50 ; Sibley, 
§8.50 ; Cradle scythes, cast steel, $8.50 ; 
silver steel, $9.50 ; " Harvest King," 
§10.50. Bush scythes, $0.50. 

BARB WIRE. — There has been no im- 
provement in this market, and trade 
continues somewhat quiet. The price of 
barb wire is $3 per 100-tb. keg, f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE— A few good 
orders are reported this week, but busi- 
ness, generally, is very quiet. We quote : 
Nos. (J, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45 ; No. 0, 
$2.80; No. 10, $3.55; No. 11, $3.65; No. 
12, $2.95; No. 13, $3.05; No. 14, $4.05; 
No. 15, $4.55; No. 16, $4.80; No. 17, 
$5.20 ; No. 18, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— There is a 
moderate inquiry but nothing special is 
doing. No quotable change has been 
made, bright and annealed still selling on 
a base of $2.60 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Mont- 
real, Toronto. Halifax, London, Hamil- 
ton and St. John. Net extras per 100 lb. 
are as follows: Coppered wire, 60c; tin- 
ned wire, $2; oiling, 10c; spring wire, 
•S|. -J.")-, best steel wiic, 75c.; bright soft 
drawn. L5c; special hay-baling wire. 30c. 
KINK WIRE.— We have still to report a 
quiet market in line wire. The discount 
remains at 22.V per cent. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.- Little 
improvement is shown in this trade. The 

market is quiet and discount unchanged 
at Oi) pei- cent. 

FENCE STAPLES.— Then; is a fair in- 
quiry for staples. The price of galvan- 
ized is $3.25 per 100-ib. keg, and of bright 
staples, $2.90 per LOO-lfe. keg ; 25 and 50 
lb. packages, 25c. extra. 

WIRE NAILS.— Business is fairly good 
In (his line. Nothing of importance has 
occurred, and the price is unchanged, 
small lots selling at $2.55 and carlots al 
82.50. f.o.b. Montreal. London. Hamil- 



ton, Toronto, Gananoque, Brantford, 
Windsor, Out., St. John and Halifax. 

CUT NAILS.— Trade continues along 
about as usual with nothing special to 
report. The price is $2.45 per keg, in 
small lots, and in carlots, *'2.'M h per 
keg. 

HORSE NAILS.— The market is not 
active. The discounts are unchanged as 
follows: "C" brand, 50 and 7^ per cent, 
off ; " M " brand, for " Oval " and "New 
City " heads, 60 per cent, off, and for 
" New Countersunk " heads, 66 2-3 per 
cent. off. "Monarch" horse nails are also 
discounted at 66 2-3 per cent. 

HORSESHOES— Business is. quiet, and 
our quotations are as follows : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 
and larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.75 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4.00 ; X L 
steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.60 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; 
feather - weight, all sizes, $4.85 ; toe 
weight, steel shoes, all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. extra. 

SCREWS. — The demand for screws is 
keeping up very well, and there is a fairly 
active market this week. Discounts are : 
Round head bright, 82^ and 10 per cent.; 
Hat head bright, 87£ and 10 per cent.; 
brass, round heads, 75 and 10 per cent.; 
brass, flat heads, 80 and 10 per cent. 

CORDAGE— There is no quotable 
change to report this week. The market 
is rather quiet, except in hayfork rope, 
which is moving out well. Our quota- 
tions are as follows : Manila, I5c; British 
manila, 13c; sisal, 12£c; lathyarn, lie. 
Prices on binder twine are as follows : 
Blue Ribbon, 650 feet to the pound, 15c; 
Rcclcat, 600 feet to the pound, 14c. ; 
Tiger, 550 feet to the pound, 13c ; 
Standard, 500 feet to the pound, \\\c: 
sisal, 500 feet to the pound. lHc. Prices 
are subject to a rebate of {c. in carload 
lots. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— No further 
change has been made in the discounts of 
rivets and burrs. The' market is not 
particularly active. Quotations follow : 
Rest iron rivets, section carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 
and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
with the usual proportion of burrs, 45 
per cent, off, and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5-tb. carton boxes, are 
quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, off list. 

BOLTS.— Business continues fairly satis- 
factory. No quotable change has occur 
red, and we quote the discounts as 
follows : Norway carriage bolts. 55 per 
cent.; common, 50 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 55 per cent.; machine 
bolts, 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws. 
66 2-3 per cent.; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 and 
5 per cent.; blank bolts, 50 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 50 and 5 per cent.; 
plough bolts, 50 and 5 per cent. To any 
retailer an extra discount of 10 per cent, 
is allowed. Tire bolts, 67 £ per cent. ; 
stove bolts. 07£ per cent. Nuts, square, 
3} per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 3£c. 



per lb. off list. To all retailers an extra 
discount of ^c per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER.— Jobbers report a 
good demand for all lines of building 
paper, and the volume of business doing 
is large. Our ((dotations are as follows : 
Tarred 'felt, $1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
ready roofing, 85c. per roll ; 3- ply, $1.10 
per roll ; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; 
dry sheathing, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll; 
tarred fibre, 60c. per roll ; K and I X 
L, 65c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, 
$30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c per roll. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH.— The demand 
for this is very good and the price re- 
mains at $1.37 ^ per 100 square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING.— A fair business 
is doing, but the demand is falling off. 
Canadian or English netting is discount- 
ed as follows : 2 x 2 mesh, 19 wire, 50 
and lit per cent. ; 2 x 2 mesh, heavier 
wire, 50 per cent. Canadian list used. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— Trade continues 
brisk on all lines. Discount. 60 per 
cent. 

FIREBRICKS.— There is not much 
doing in firebricks. English sell at $16 
to $22 per 1,000, and Scotch at $17 to 
$22 per 1,000. 

CEMENT.— The market is quiet. Our 
quotations are : Canadian cement, 
$1.90 to $2.25; German, $2.20 to $2.30; 
English, $2.15 to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 
to $1.95 per bbl. ex-wharf, and Amer- 
ican, $2.10 to $2.20 ex-cars. 

METALS. 

The volume of business in metals keeps 
up well, considering the falling off in 
other lines. Should the cargo of the 
wrecked steamer Monteagle prove to be 
too badly damaged for use, there will 
likely be considerable shortage in sup 
plies felt for a while. This will particu- 
larly affect Canada plates, black sheet 
iron, galvanized iron and tinplates. But 
even with the further supplies which are 
now on the way here some scarcity is 
bound to lie felt in the heavier metals for 
fall. The hardware trade are not loo 
heavily stocked with these goods and 
were awaiting the arrival of the wrecked 
steamer for some time, as the goods 
were wanted immediately. It is state! 
that it will be impossible to repeat some 
orders at the same figures and that bet 
ler prices will be asked for goods arriv 
ing later. At present it is not possible 
to tell to what extent the cargo is dam 
ace, I. but it is feared, to judge by the 
condition of the vessel, thai the loss will 
be considerable. The prices of metals flh 
the local market have been steady during 
the week. Old Country reports slate that 
Canada plates are dearer. 

PIG IRON.— There is no change in this 
market. Canadian pig iron is quoted at 
sis. :,n to $19 and Summerlee, $21.50 t<> 
s±>. 

BAR I RON.— Business continues fairly 
active. Merchants' bar is worth $2 anil 
horseshoe iron. ^2.20. 

BLACK SHEETS.— The demand is fair 
ami improving. We quote; 28 gauge, $2.65; 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



ENGLISH 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 

FIRE 

building 

Enamelled 

SILICA 
MAGNESIA 

DRAIN 
CULVERT 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



BRICKS. 



} PIPES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWEPiPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

m CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 



BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is r. quired; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



.. 



MIDLAND 



n 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land' ' will rival in quality and grading the 
rery best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prices to Silai Agenta 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

#r to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. U«h«« 



26 gauge, §2.60 ; 20 to 24 gauge, §2.50, 
and 8 to 20 gauge, §2.50. 

GALVANIZED IKON.— Trade is grow- 
ing more active in this line. Prices have 
not changed. We quote : No. 28, Queen' 
Head, §4.40; Apollo, 10£ oz., §4.40; 
Fleur de Lis, §4.15 ; Comet, §4.25 ; "Bell" 
brand, §4.30. For less than case lots 
10c. extra is charged. 

INGOT COPPER— We quote J4c. 

INGOT TIN.— Straits sell at, 334c, with 
a moderate inquiry. 

PIG LEAD. — There has been no im- 
provement in the market. The price is 
13.25. 

LEAD PIPE. — Business in lead pipe has 
been somewhat better than last week, but 
the market is not particularly active. 
The price of composition and waste U 
8c. and of ordinary, 7c. The discount is 
still 37.1 per cent. 

IRON PIPE.— An active trade is still 
done in this market. No quotable 
change has been made, and we quote as 
follows : Black pipe, £, §3 ; \, §2.40 ; j-, 
§2.05; -!,, $3; i, §3.7ll ; 1-in., ?5.25 ; 1^, 
§7.40 ; 14, §8.9U ; 2-in., §12.40. Galvan- 
ized, i, §3.20 ; I, §3.45 ; i, §4 ; |, §5.05 ; 
1-in., §7.25 ; l|-, §10.10 ; 1£, §12.15 ; 2-in., 
§10.70. Extra heavy pipe, plain ends, 
arc quoted, per 100 ft., as follows: Black, 
4, §4.35 ; I, §5.30 ; i-in., §7.60 ; 1£, §10.- 
60; H, §12.70; 2-in., §17.45. Galvanized, 
h, §5.35 ; I, §6.70 ; 1-in., §9.60 ; \\, §13.- 
30; H, §15.95; 2-in., §21.75. For 
threads and couplings 5 per cent, is 
added. 

TLNPLATES— There is a good de- 
mand. Charcoals sell at §4.75 to §5.25 
per box ; cokes, at §4.25 per box. 

CANADA PLATES.— The inquiry for 
Canada plates is very good, but stock's 
in jobbers' hands are diminishing rapidly 
and some scarcity is expected for a 
while. Quotations are as follows : 52's. 
§2.70 to §2.80 ; 60's, §2.85 to §2.90 ; 75's. 
§2.80 to §2.85 ; full polished, §3.75, and 
galvanized, §4.25 to §1.35; galvanized, 
60' s ; §4.45 to §4.55. 

STEEL. — There is no change. The 
market is active. We quote as follows ; 
Sleighshoe, §2.10; tire, §2.20; bar, §2.05; 
spring, §2.85 ; reeled machinery, §2.75 ; 
toecalk, §2.70. 

SHEET STEEL.— The demand for this 
has not materially improved and the 
volume of business is small. We quote 
Nos. 10 to 20, §2.511; 3-16, 82. 511 ; j. 
5-16, and |, §2.40. 

TOOL STEEL.— A small amount ot 
business has been done during the week 
at unchanged prices. We quote : Black 
Diamond. 8c; Sanderson's, 8 to 12c . 
according to grade; Jessop's, 13c; Leon 
ard's, 7ic; donas & Clover's, 8 t<> 15c; 
" Air Hardening," 30 to 50c. 

TERNE PLATES.— The market for 
terne plates is quiet and featureless. Wo 
quote §7.50. 

COIL CHAIN.— In this line trade is not 
very active though there is a linn tone 
to the market and higher prices have 
been quoted bv some dealers. We quote as 
follows :No. <;.' I2.',c; No. 5, Kl.'.c.; No. I, 
10c; No. 3, 9ic; £-ineh, 7£c. per lb.; 
5-16, §5; 5-16 exact, §5.25; §, §4.25; 
7-16, §4.05; £, §3.95; 9-16, §3.85; |, 
§3.55; f, §3.50; I, §3.45; 1-inch, §3.45. 
In carload lots an allowance of 10c is 
made. 

SHEET ZINC— The market is still 
quiet and the price unchanged from $5.35 
to §6.25. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Sanderson's Tool Steel 
Merchant Bar Steel 
Bar, Band and Hoop Iron 
Steel Sheets and Plates 
Structural Steel, etc., etc. 

Import orders for wholesale buyers only. 



509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 




McDOUGALL PUMPS 



ARE 



Only the best is good 
enough for our customers 
and we don't ask too 
much for them either. 

Your jobber sells them, 
or if not, he does not sell 
the best. 

We have a Catalogue 
for you. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited, 

GALT, ONT. 



Pig Iron 



We offer to arrive 



No. i Eglinton 
No. 1 Middlesbro' 
No. 3 " 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u.^ 

NEW GLASGOW. U.S. 

Manufacturers o f 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTTH 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



\ Good Thing 

when once tried is sure to make a strong 
appeal to your customers and meet with corre- 
sponding appreciation. 

This is demonstrated by the increasing 
demand for 

Elastilite Varnish, 
Chijap Floor Lac, 
Maple Leaf Varnish Stain 
and Coach Enamels. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



The 



Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



LIMITED 



Toronto, Ont., Canada. 



Canadian Agents for Buehne's "Red, White and Blue" Brand Steel Wool. 



Don't tell a customer you are out of "Ark Brand" 
Paint. 

See to it that you always have a supply. 

Do not wait for our travellers if you find yourself 
running short of 

"Ark Brand" 
Paint 



but write to us mentioning our traveller's name. 

You have our color cards — if not, we will send 
them on application — and you will have your orders by 
mail filled promptly. 

Write to-day and arrange for the agency for your 



town. 



*» 



» FRANCIS-FROST C°i... 



ted 



TORONTO. 
Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



ANTIMONY.— There is little .Icing-. The 
price remains at LOc. 

ZINC SPELTER— This is quoted at 5c. 
Traili-' is still very quirt. 

SOLDER.— There is no change in this 
market, which continues active. Bar 
solder sells for 18c. and wire solder, 20c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The feature of the paint and oil market 
during the past week has been the further 
decline in linseed oil of 2c. and the drop 
of 2c. in turpentine. The reason in both 
eases is on account of the larger sup- 
plies, more than sufficient for the de- 
mand. The market is fairly well sup- 
plied now and the inquiry is not as ac- 
tive as it was a few weeks ago. There 
is also a falling off in orders for the 
general list of painters' materials, and 
though manufacturers do not appeal- to 
be at all slack, yet the usual quiet time 
is settiiiL! in. Slocks of dry white lead 
and zinc and paris green are reported 
very light. Varnishes are still moving 
w ell. We quote : 

WHITE LEAD.— Best brands, Govern- 
ment standard, §5.874; No. 1, $5.50; 
No. 2, $5,124 ; No. 3, $4.75 ; No. 4, 
$4,374 all i'.o.b. Montreal. 

DRY WHITE LEAD.— §5.25 in casks; 
kegs, $5.50. 

DRV WHITE ZINC- Pure dry, in 

casks, <e]c; in 100-Ib. kegs, 6|c. No. 1 

zinc, in casks, 5,jc; in L00-lb. kegS, 5fc 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Pure, 

25 II. irons. 8c; No. I, 7c; No. -2. 6c. 

I'IITTY.--We quote: Bulk, in bbls., 



§1.90 
$2.05 
ders, 
$2.40 
than 



red 
and 



less 

litharge, casks, 
100 lb. 



per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 
bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
n 100 or 200-lb. kegs or boxes, 
in tins, $2.55 to §2.65 ; in less 
100- lb. lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. higher, 
f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL.— Casks, 7c; 100- 
Ib. kegs, 7^c; smaller quantities, 8£c 

RED LEAD.— Genuine red lead, in casks, 
§4.50 ; in 100-Ib. kegs, $4.75 ; in less 
quantities, §5.75 per 100 tb. No. 1 
lead, casks, §4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 

LITHARGE. — Ground, casks, 5c ; 
quantities, 54c; flake 
§5.25 ; smalls, §5.75 per 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, 80c; boiled. 83c 
In ."> to 9 bids., Lc. less. Terms, net cash 
in .'in days. Delivered in Ontario, be- 
tween .Montreal and Oshawa. at 2c per 
gal. advance. 

TURPENTINE— Single barrels, 70c; 2 

to I barrels, 69c Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 

SHELLAC VARNISH.— Pure white, 
§2.35 to $2.45 ; orange, §2.25 to $2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS.— $1.20 to $1.45 
gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— 8| to 9Jc 

lots, and 4c additional foi 

SEAL OIL.-48 to 50c. 

COD OIL— 35 to 374c 

PARIS GREEN.— Petroleum, bbls.. 
hi-c. per lb.; arsenic kesrs, 17c; 50 and 
100-Ib. drums, 174c; 25-lb. drums, 18c; 



per 

in wholesale 
small lots. 



1-lb. packages, 184c; $-R>. packages, 
204c; lib. tins, 194c; 4-lb. tins, 214c 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of de- 
livery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The market this week is quiet and 
without feature. All lines of metals are 
dull. There has, however, been no quol 
able change, and prices are as fol 
lows : Heavy copper and wire, 104c per 
lb.; light copper, 8c; heavy red brass, 
104c; heavy yellow, 9c. ; light brass, 5c; 
lead, 2 to 24;c; zinc, 2£c; iron No. 1, 
wrought, $15 ; No. 2, $7 per ton ; ma- 
chinery scrap, $16 ; stove plate, $12 ; 
malleable and steel, $5 ; mixed country 
rags, 60 to 70c. per 100 tb. ; old rubbers, 
6 to (i£c per lb. 

GLASS. 

Then- is little demand for si'lass on this 
market, and trade continues quiet. We 
now- quote: First break. 50 feet, S-2.IH- 
second, $2.20 for 50 feet; first break, 100 
feet, $4 ; second break, $4.20 ; third 
break, $4.70 ; fourth break, $4.95. 






HIDES. 



The only change to report in this mar 
ket is in lambskins, which are quoted at 
an advance of 5c. Other lines are 
steady. We quote : No. I hides, 10c. -. 
No. 2, 9c; No. 3, 8c Calfskins, 12c. ; 
lambskins, 30c. 

MONTRFAL NOTRS 

No. I lambskins are .V. higher. 
Currycombs have advanced It) per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



ONTARIO MARKETS 

Toronto, July 18, 002. 
HARDWARE. 

FOR .JULY the hardware business is 
being- well sustained. The rains in 
June of this year seem to have 
kept back the crops and retarded trade, 
Aaving some of the business that last 
war was done in June to be done in 
.July this season. Harvest tools are 
meeting with a good sorting-up demand, 
and the trade in builders' hardware this 
year is heavier than last year. Inquiries 
and encouraging reports keep coming in 
from the lumber regions, specifications 
are being forwarded, and some contracts 
already have been closed. There is a 
better demand for eavetroughing this 
year than last, and quite a few orders 
in s loves and ranges are being booked for 
shipment in the fall. Jobbers claim 
that this fall there will be a scarcity of 
stoves, as the factories have not yet 
been able to make their output equal to 
the demand. The prices of currycombs 
have been advanced 10 per cent. The 
manufacturers claim that they had to 
make these changes on account of the in- 
creased cost of labor and material. 

BARB "WIRE.— There is a fair demand 
for bar!} wire, and as there is a scarcity 
of stocks on hand, jobbers can hardly 
wait for their supplies to be shipped 
from Cleveland to fill their orders. Barb 
wire, in carlots, is quoted at $2.65, and 
for less than carlots, $2.77-^- f.o.b. Cleve- 
land. From stock, Toronto, the price 
is 13.00. 

GALVANIZE!) WIRE.— There are a 
number of small orders being received in 
this line. Quotations are : Nos. 6, 7 
and 8, $3.50 to 83.85 per 100 lb., accord- 
ing to quantity ; No. 9, §2.85 to $3.15 ; 
No. 10, $3.60 to $3.95 ; No. 11, $3.70 to 
$4.10 ; No. 12, $3 to $3.30 ; No. 13, $3.10 
to $3.40 ; No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50 ; No. 15, 
$4.60 to $5.50 ; No. 16, $4.85 to $5.35. 
Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. Cleveland are 
quoted at $2.52^ in less than carlots and 
12c. less for carlots of 15 tons. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— The volume 
of trade in this line continues fair and 
prices are unchanged. We quote the 
base price as follows : $2.60 per 100 
lb. Oiling, 10c. ; coppering, 60c, and tin- 
ning, $2 per 100 lb. extra. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Mont- 
real, with freights equalized on those 
points. 

FINE STEEL WIRE.— The demand con- 
tinues fair and prices are steady. The 
discount remains unchanged at 224 per 
cent. 

WIRE NAILS.— The demand for these 
continues to be well sustained, and some 
of the manufacturers are unable to fill 
their orders. The smaller sizes are the 
scarcest. We quote $2.55 for less than 
carlots and $2.50 for carlots. The de- 
livery points are : Toronto, Hamilton. 
Eondon, Gananoque and Montreal. 

CUT NAILS. — The situation in cut 
nails is unchanged. The base price is 
quoted at $2.45 per keg and I2.37.V for 
carlots. 

HORSE NAILS.— The steadiness in 
these noted last week continues. The 
discounts are : " C " brand, oval head, 
50 and 7^ per cent.; on " M " brand, 50, 
10 and 5 per cent.; "Monarch," 60 2-3 
per cent. Countersunk head, 60 per cent. 

HORSE SHOES. -There is a fair trade 
in these being done at unchanged prices : 



IMPROVED BUILDING MATERIALS. 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



All the newest and most effective ideas are embodied in our 
metallic goods. 

Xhe points that make for convenience in handling — for long dura- 
tion — for most efficient service. 

The points that make fully satisfied customers. Isn't it to your own 
interest to sell the goods that never require an after apology or ex- 
planation ? Consult our catalogue for full information about our metallic 

CEILINGS, CORNICES, LATHING, 

SHINGLES, SKY LIGHTS, CORRUGATED IRON- 

SIDINGS, VENTILATORS, FINIALS. 

And other goods for all kinds of architectural purposes. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited, 

Wholesale Manufacturers, 
TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



♦ 



Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, $3.60 ; snow shoes, 
$3.85 : light steel shoes, $3.70 ; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.95 ; iron shoes, No. 
J and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; light 
steel shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $1.95. 

SCREWS. — The demand for screws is 
keeping up very well, and, if anything, 
is better than last week. The difficulty 
experienced in having the orders rilled by 
the manufacturers is as great as ever. 
The' discounts are : Flat head bright, 
*7.l and 10 per cent.; round head 
bright. 82£ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 65 per cent., and flat head bronze, 
70 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— There contin- 
ues to be a scarcity of these in the hands 
of the jobbers and the demand is about 
the same as last week. The discounts 
are now as follows : Iron rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent.; h - on burrs, 55 per cent.; cop- 
per rivets, with usual proportion of 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 
30 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS— Jobbers ' in this 
line are busy, but they find it difficult to 
replenish their stocks. Manufacturers 
claim they are much put about for want 
of workmen. We quote : Carriage bolts, 
common ($1.00 list), 50 per cent. ; 
carriage bolts, full square ($2.40 list), 55 
per cent.: carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3 list), 55 per cent.; machine bolts, all 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent.: coach screws, 
cone points, 66 2-3 per cent.; elevator 
shaft and whiflfletree bolts, 50 per cent. 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS.- 
There is a good demand for screen doors 
and windows, and stocks are well assort- 
ed. Quotations are : Common doors, two 
or three panel, f.o.b. factory points 
as follows : Walnut, stained, 3-inch style, 
$6.80 per dozen ; stained, yellow, $7 ; 
natural color, oil finish, $8.15 ; 4-inch 
style, 20c. extra per dozen. Windows : 
No. 0. $1.60 : No. 1, $1.70 ; No. 2, $1.95 ; 
No. 3, $2.10 ; No. 4, $2.50 per dozen. 



GREEN WIRE CLOTH.— There keeps 
up quite a sorting-up trade in this line. 
We quote 81.37-J per 100 square feet. 

SPADES AND SHOVELS.— There is a 
fair amount of business doing in spades 
and shovels. Discount, 40 and 5 per- 
cent . 

ROPE. — There is the usual amount of 
trade doing in this line at unchanged 
prices. We quote: Pure manila, 15c; Brit- 
ish manila, 13c; sisal, 12-^-c; lathyarn, 
single, lie, double, 1 He; sisal bed cord, 
3-cord, 48 feet, 65c; 60feet, 80c; 72 feet, 
95c. per dozen. 

BINDER TWINE.— There have been no 
changes in prices as yet, and the demand 
is commencing to improve. We quote : 
"Blue Ribbon,'' 650 ft., 15c: "Red 
Cap," 6(10 ft., lie; "Tiger," 580 ft.. 
13c; sisal, 500 ft., 1 lie 

HARVEST TOOLS.— Trade in this line 
is without new features, and the amount 
of business doing is fair. Discount, 60 
per cent. 

EAVETROUGH, ETC.— The busy season 
in this line is now on and jobbers say 
the volume of trade doing this season :s 
in excess of that of the same period last 
year. The prices are firm and unchan- 
ged. We quote: Eavetrough, s:s in p, , 
100 square feet, for 10-inch, and conduc- 
tor pipe at $4 for 3-inch, and $5.25 for 
4-inch. 

BUILDING PAPER.— Business in this 
line keeps up well. Quotations are as 
follows : Dry sheathing, grey or straw, 
35c. per roll ; tar sheathing, grey or 
straw, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per 
roll ; tarred fibre, 60c. per roll. 

LAWN MOWERS.— The season for these 
is nearly over. A few orders are still 
being given to manufacturers for small 
lots, and the discounts arc as follows: .VI 
per cent, on high-wheeled lawn mowers, 
" Star " mowers, 9-in. wheels, $2.25 to 
$3 ; " Daisv " mowers, 7-in. wheels, 
82.25 to $2.50. 

HARVEST WHIPS.— A fair amount of 
business is doing in harvest whips. 

POULTRY NETTING.— This line is 
meeting with a moderate demand at un- 
changed prices. 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



T1NWAKE AND ENAMELLED WARE. 

— The amount of business doing in tin- 
ware is somewhat less than it was. In 
enamelled ware there is a great call tor 
preserving kettles. 

SPORTING GOODS.— Quite a few guns 
are being forwarded to different points in 
the Province. Loaded shells are also 
(el ive. 

CEMENT.— Trade is a little quieter 
this week than before in cement, but the 
market continues strong with no further 
advance. Buyers tire holding hack a 
little, owing to this firmness and the fact 
that at present they are provided with 
sufficient stocks of cement to supply their 
wants for some time to come.. We quote : 
Canadian Portland, §2.25 to §2.85, and 
Canadian hydraulic, §1.35 to §1.60 per 
bbl. 

METALS. 

Business in metals continues steady 
without any large buying movement, and 
the market conditions are similar to 
those of last week. In the United States 
copper was slightly depressed, and as 
many consumers are expecting the prices 
to ease off, they seem to be acting on 
this belief and Restricting purchases. Tin, 
both iii London. Eng., and the Republic, 
is firm. The United States pig iron mar- 
ket is quiet and strong, and production 
is going on at a rapid rate. 

PIG IRON.— In the United States pig 
iron is quiet and firm, with a small 
amount of trade doing. The local mar- 
ket continues strong. We quote' on track. 
Toronto: No. 1 foundry, §21. and No. 
2. §20.50. 

STEEL BOILER PLATES.— These con- 
tinue strong and active. We quote §1.80 
for carload lots, on track, Toronto. 

STEEL BEAMS.— A fair amount of 
business continues at unchanged price-. 
We quote $2.75 for steel beams, from 
stock, and S;> per 100 lb. for carload 
lots on track. 

STEEL BAILS.— Our quotations for 
steel rails are 830 per ton for steam rail- 
way rails, and §.'15 per ton for electric 
railway rails. 

TOOL STEEL- A steady market con- 
tinues locally in tool steel, and our 
quotations are as follows : "B 0" and 
" Black Diamond," 10 to lie; Jessop's, 
Morton's and Firth's, 14c; Jonas & Col- 
ver's, 8 to 15c.; ditto, " Air Hardening," 
30 to 50c; Chas. Leonard's, 8 to 9c; 
Park's " Silver," 12 to 14c; Park's 
Special, 15 to 20c 

MILD STEEL.— This continues in fair 
demand. 

SPRING STEEL.— A fair amount of 
business continues to be done locally in 
spring steel. 

BOILER Tl BES— The values of these 
are steadily maintained on the local 
market . 

BAR IRON.— There is a scarcity of bar 
iron on the local market with a good 
demand. The United States markets are 
firmer and quiet, with some business 
doing for the last half of this and the 
first quarter of next year, but sellers are 
not seeking business. We quote: SI. 05 to 
§2.05 base. Extras cut to length while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c per 100 lb.; 
1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 
20c; over 20 ft. by special agreement, 
according to lencth and size. 

BLACK SHEETS.- The demand is still 
active and the prices are unchanged. We 
quote ; Common, 83.15 for 28 gauge, and 
dead Bat, x-j.50 for 26 gauge. 

CANADA PLATES.— There is at pres- 
ent, a good demand for these. We quote 



All dull. §:! ; half polished. $3.10, and all 
bright, §3.75. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS— The local 
market continues in about the same con- 
dition as last week. We quote in ease 
iots, as follows : Queen's Head, §4.50 for 
28 gauge ; American, §4.40 for 29 gauge, 
Bell brand, §4.20 for 28 gauge. 

TIN. — The outside markets for tin are 
firm. The local demand has dropped off. 
We quote §32 to §33 per KM) lb. 

TINPLATES— A fair amount of busi- 
ness is being done. We quote: Char 
coal, §4.75 to §5 per box, and cokes, 
§1.25 per box. 

COPPER. — Some inquiry has been made 
for ingot copper. We quote : Ingot cop- 
per, x I | per Hill lb., and sheet copper. 
S22 to §23. 

BRASS. — This metal continues unchan- 
ged with a good demand. The discount 
i ; 15 per cent. 

PIG LEAD.— This metal has become 
quiet on the local market during the 
week. Pig lead is quoted at §3.50 to 
S3. 75. and bar. §5. 

IRON PI PL. -The local trade has im- 
proved with the settlement of the plumb- 
ers' strike, and a large amount of busi- 
ness is now doing. Quotations arc per 
100 ft. : i-in., §2.40; fin., §2.65; fin., 
§2.85; f-in., §3.65; 1-in., §5.20; lj-in., 
§7.35 ; H-in., §8.95 ; 2-in., §12.55 ; gal- 
vanized, 1-in., §7.20. Trade discount 4 
per cent. 

ZINC SPELTER.— This line continues 
in fair demand. We quote §5 to §6. 

ZINC SHEETS.— Trade is steady. We 
quote : Cask lots, §6 to §6.25, and part 
casks, §6.25 to §6.50. 

SOLDER. — Trade in solder continues 
brisk, and prices are unchanged. 

ANTIMONY— There is some local busi- 
ness doing in antimony. W'e quote $19.50 

per 100 lb. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The market this week is without new 
features. The declines in linseed oil and 
turpentine have been maintained. The 
stocks of the latter on hand are light, and 
fancy prices are being paid for small lots of 
one or two barrels. The market for spirits 
of turpentine in the South continues to 
weaken and prices have declined some since 
last week. The weakness there was caused 
by unexpectedly large receipts of spirits at 
various ports in the South. On the 
local market there is not much demand 
for raw and boiled linseed oil, owing to 
the buyers refusing to purchase ahead. 
Trade in red leads and white leads ground 
in pure linseed oil shows a slight falling off. 
A number of sorting up orders keep the 
ready mixed paints active. The trade in 
zinc whites this season is exceptionally 
gcod. Putty is commencing to move nicely 
and castor oil is quiet. We quote as 
follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $5 87>£ ; No. i, #5.50; No. 2, 
$5.i2j£; No. 3. $4.75; No. 4, $4 37 X in 
packages of 25 lb. and upwards ; %c. per 
lb. extra will be charged for 12 y z lb. pack- 
ages ; genuine dry white lead in casks, 
$5.12^. 



f\ Jk l/Ly'Q the original and only Genuine Pre- 
111! IV I ¥ «\ paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
UnllL I V 6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LlMITtu 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORM AN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 






PRIEST'S CLIPPERS. | 

Largest Variety, 1 m 

Toilet, Hind, Electric Power! fW 

ARE THE BEST. 4 I 

Highert Quality Grooming and 
Sbeep-Sheving Machine!. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8ZKD FOS CATALOGUE TO 
Am»rUu Skeanr Ulg. Co., Ifuhaa, H.H..C8* 




V 



NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door Closer 
They work silently and effectually, and never get 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE SOLELY BY 

W NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



An 
Experience. 

One of the largest 
operators on the 
North Shore after 
one year's experi- 
ence of CROWN 
JEWEL AXES 
in his shanties is 
so satisfied he will 
not consider buy- 
ing any other. 



Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Haldimand, Jr., Montreal Agent. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



37 



• 4** *P 



s* «►• 



,v* 



Which are being manufactured at our Dominion Works are WARRANTED. Made from selected 
Vast Steel by experienced workmen. We can supply any Shape, Size or Cut in this brand at very 
lowest prices (Quality considered). For sale by the following Wholesale Hardware Merchants : 



Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham & Workman^ Montreal. 
Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Limited, Toronto. 



Thos. Birkett & Sons, Ottawa. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London. 

D. H. Howden & Co., London. 

E. Q. Prior & Co., Victoria, B.C. 



WALTER GROSE, 



SELLING 
AGENT, 



Montreal. 



NICHOLSON EILE CO., Port l1o|>e, Ont. 



Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5 to $5.12^; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 
55.50; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., $4; ditto, 
kegs cf 100 lb., $4. 50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6^c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7>£ t0 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to $6 25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Shingle Stain — In 5-gal. lots, 60c. to 
J 1. 20 per gal. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, 17c. per gal.; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 
$2.25 to 52.35 ; white, $2.35 to $2.45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, 10c. extra. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2 25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2 40 ; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., $2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb.. $2 90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, 51.20 to 51.40 
per gal. ; No. 1, $1.10 per gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, g}4 to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to ioj^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil- Raw, 1 to 2 barrels, 82c. ; 
boiled, 85c. ; 3 to 5 barrels, raw, 81c; 
boiled, 84c. ; 6 to 9 barrels, raw, 77c. ; boiled, 
82c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamilton and 
London, 2c. less. All quantities of 10 bbls. 
snd over of linseed oil. sold only f.o.b. 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Guelph. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 71c; 2 to 
4 barrels, 70c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than, barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

There is a fair demand for glass, but a 
scarcity in some sizes. We quote : Under 
26 in., 5445 ; 26 to 40 in., 54 65 ; 41 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 



THE CELEBRATED 

National Cutlery Co. Shears 

Acknowledged the best and fully warranted. 
Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

Tailors' Shears, 

Trimmers, 

Ladies' 

Scissors, 
Barbers' 

Shears, 
Tinners' 

Snips. 

DECATUR, BULL & CO., Sales Agents. MONTREAL 




to 50 in., $5.10; 51 to 60 in., $5.35 ; 
61 to 70 in., $5 75 ; 71 to 80, $6.25 ; 81 to 
85, $7 ; 86 to 90, $7.75 ; Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London. Terms, 4 months, or 3 
per cent. 30 days. Discount off pane price 
i' st > 33 Vi P er cent. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

Trade in old material, though not so 
heavy as it was, is still fairly well main- 
tained. Prices are unchanged. We quote as 
follows : Heavy copper and wire, io^c. per 
lb. ; light copper, 8c. per lb. ; heavy red brass, 
ioc; heavy yellow brass, 8 to 8j£c; light 
brass, 5c; lead, 2»^c; scrap zinc, 2% 
to 2j£c; iron, No. 1 wrought, $14 per 
net ton ; No. 2 wrought, $6 ; machinery 
cast scrap, $14; stove plate, $10; malleable 
and steel, $6 ; old rubbers, 6c. per lb., and 
country mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — In hides little business is being 
done and the prices are steady. We quote : 
No. 1 green, 7^c ; No. 2 green, 6j£c; 
No. 1 green, steers, 8^c; No. 2 green, 
steers, 7%c\ cured, 8 to S}(c. 

Skins — The prices of shearlings have 
advanced 5c. 0;her lines are unchanged. 
Our quotations are now as follows : 
Veal skins, 6 to 14 lb. inclusive, No. 1, 
ioc; No. 2. 8c ; do., 15 to 20 lb. inclusive, 
No. 1, 9c; No. 2, 7c; deacons (dailies), 



60 to 70c each ; lambskins, 30c. ; shearl- 
ings, 25c 

Wool — The market continues dull and 
featureless. The prices are weak at 13c 
for fleece wool and 7c per lb. for unwashed. 

Tallow — The demand is good and 
prices are firm and unchanged. We quote : 
6X t0 6X C - per lb. for tallow. 
COAL. 

Nothing new has come to light in the coal 
market, and no settlement has yet appar- 
ently been arrived at by the striking men 
and their employers. Should this condition 
of affairs continue much longer very high 
prices will have to be paid for coal during 
the winter. At International bridges our 
quotations are as follows : Soft coal, 53 to 
$4 per ton. 

PETROLEUM. 

There is a fair demand for petroleum 
and the market continues unchanged. We 
quote as follows : Pratt's Astral, 17 
to I7^c. in bulk (barrels extra); American 
water white, 17% to 18c. in barrels; 
Photogene, 17 to I7>£c. ; Sarnia water 
white, 16^ to 17c in barrels ; Sarnia prime 
white, 15 to \^%c. in barrels. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Currycombs have been advanced 10 per 
cent. 



38 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



BUILDING PERMITS IN TORONTO. 

THE following permits were taken 
out during the last week in To- 
ronto : G. McKenzie, for one- 
storey addition on Waliner Road, near 
Lowtber, Tor $450; Edward Blake, for 
one-storey frame anil roughcast dwelling 
at 169 Hamilton street, for $200 ; 
Hooper and Beckel. two wooden veran- 
dahs at 520-522 Ontario street, for $250 ; 
Massey- II arris Co., for one-storey brick 
addition for bolt and nut department. 
King street west, near Straehan avenue, 
for 81,100; Jas. T. Ardell, for two- 
storey brick front and foundation, rough- 
cast sides and back, at 328 Carlton street, 
for $1,200 ; Gilbert Sanders, for two- 
storey addition to dwelling at 31-33 Wood 
street, for $450; Mrs. Clarkson and Mrs. 
Millichamp, for two-storey and attic pair 
semi-detached brick dwellings, Barton 
avenue, near Howland avenue, for $5,000; 
Thos. Swanton, for two-storey detached 
brick-veneered dwelling, 45 Lewis street. 
for $1,250; Alexander Brown Milling and 
Elevator Co.. Limited, for repairs to 
building. Esplanade street east, near 
Princess street, for $420 ;. Maxwell Drury, 
for brick dwelling at 81 Simpson ave., 
I'm- s I, si II i; .1. Casey, verandah at 207 
Jarvis street, for $200; Stewart Harts- 
horn & Co., for addition to factory at 
131 Eastern ave., for $300; J. J. Settell. 
for new store front at 629 Spadina ave., 
for $150 ; Alex. McCurdy, for two-storey 
and attic brick and stone dwelling, de- 
tached, for $2,000 ; Menzie Manufacturing 
Co.. lor three-storey brick factory an* 
smoke stack, 75 feet high, 28 ft. base, at 
11-43 Pacific ave., for §7,000; Sanderson 
Pearcy, for one-storey brick varnish fac- 
tory. Booth ave., near Eastern ave., Eor 
$5,000 ; Leonard Geo. Cross, for pair 
two storey brick cellar roughcast dwell- 
ings at (112 611 Gerrard street east, for 
$700 : H. M. Deeth, for pair semi-de- 
tached brick dwellings. Concord ave.. 
lor $4,300; Thos. Robinson, for two- 
storey dwelling, brick front, roughcast 
sides ami back, 55s Delaware ave., for 
$1,600; The Ramage Process Co., Lim- 
ited, for alterations to factory, brick, at 
12 I I Alice street, for $500 ; Thos. Me 
llwain, for two-storey and attic pair oi 
semi-detached dwellings. Close ave., for 
$6,000 ; Macpherson estate, for two storey 
and attic brick dwelling, Cluny ave.. 
near Kosedale Road, lor $5,000 ; Mac 
pherson estate, for two - storey brick 
dwelling at 23 Crescent Road, for $4,000 



BUILDING IN WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg will bid fair to realize the 
prediction of •) . \V. Wheeler, vice-presi- 
dent of the Minnesota State Bankers' 
Association. that Winnipeg m a few 
years will have a population of 100,000 
if building operations can furnish us with 
a fair criterion. Building Inspector 

Rogers makes the statement : " Our re 
sources aie simply surprising, considering 
the wei weather we have experienced. 
The permits for building to date are 
$222,000 in excess of those of last year 
to -liilv I. In other words we have issued 



permits for $1,328,350 for the period 
January I to duly 1. 

" The month of dune has been an ex- 
ceptionally busy one for builders, for we 
issued permits for $542,700. One good 
feature of the building operations this 
year is the fact that in nearly every in- 
stance in which a permit has been taken 
out the contractors have commenced 
work shortly afterwards. With a short 
spell of good clear weather we look for 
a big increase in the number of permits 
issued — 77." 

REPORTS OF THE ONTARIO 
CONVENTION. 

Secretary W. H. Meredith, of the Pro- 
vincial Association, is distributing print 
ed reports of the formation convention 
<^i the Ontario Association. He reports 
that a great number of local associa- 
tions are affiliating themselves with the 
Provincial Association. The secretary 
hopes to have a complete report ready 
for the national convention to be held 
in Halifax, beginning August 13. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

Purely, Mansell & Co., 46 Adelaide 

street west, Toronto, have taken during 
the week contracts for plumbing for the 
residence of Mr. H. H. Cook, Downing 
avenue ; for the Star Theatre, and also 
for the Ontario Bank, corner of Yonge 
and Carlton streets. 

J. B. Reeves, 783 Queen street east. 
Toronto, reports the following contract-: 
Overhauling and repairing 720-722 Gcr 
rard street east for Gooderham estate; 
plumbing and lighting a new house on 
Gerrard street east for T. Bedley ; also 
plumbing and lighting a new house on 
Simpson avenue for P. C. Drury. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Breton & Presseau, plumbers, Montreal, 
have dissolved. 

Jos. Label! & Cie, plumbers. Montreal, 
have registered. 

H. A. Despocas is curator of Joseph \. 
Giroux, St. Henri de Montreal. 

V. E. Paradis has been appointed 
curator of Win. Ford, plumber. Mont- 
real. 

The journeymen plumbers and steam 
litters, of Montreal, held their annual 
picnic at Otterbiirn Park on July 15. 

Ciiest ,.v Co.. s(i Church street. To 
lonio. have placed a 3-inch hydraulic 
water motor in The Waterous Engine 
Works, Brantford. 

Edward St. George, of St. George. 
Guilbout, Ouellette iV Desjardins, plumb- 
ers, Montreal, declares he is no longer a 
partner, and t hat the business is con 
tinceil by the remaining partners. 

A contract involving about $50,000 for 
the construction of a waterworks system 
in Lexis. Que-., has been awarded to J. 
A. Laforest, for some time superinlen 
dent of the Montreal waterworks system. 



BUILDING PERMITS IN MONTREAL. 

BUILDING permits were granted dur- 
ing the week to the following : 
W. Daniels, for a two-storey dwell- 
ing on St. Hubert street, for SI. (Mill ; 

Edwin Hanson, for alterations to dwell 
tng at 1152 Dorchester street, for $1,000; 
J. Marchand, 02 Sanguinet street, for 
alterations to house on River Lane, for 
$1,500; E. Major, for one house, one 
store and anc warehouse, five storeys, on 
St. Catherine street, for $16,000 ; Camille 
Poirier, for one house of three dwellings, 
three storeys, 27 and 29 St. Adolphus 
-ireet. for $1,500 ; Bernier cV Freres, 117 
and 111) Sanguinet street, one house, two 
dwellings. two storeys, on Morreau 
street, for $1,250; F. Fleury, 96 Desey 
street, one house, three dwellings, on St. 
Catherine street, for $2,500 : Beanlmore 
& Co.. 26 St. Peter street, for one ware 
house, seven storeys, at 57 St. Peter 
street, for $30,000; Wire and Cable Co 
Guv street, cistern, for $3,550 ; George 
W. Stevens, 18 St. Alexis street, altera- 
tions at 82-84 St. Francis Xavier str 

for $4,000 : George R. Hooper, 24 St. 
Mark street, alterations to three-storey 
dwelling' at corner of Boyle and St. 
Mark street . for S3,500. 



A USEFUL HANDBOOK. 

Montreal's inspector of buildings. 
Alcide Chausse, is compiling a handbook 
which will be of great value to those en 
gaged in the building industries and kin 
died industries in Montreal. The work 
is a volume of 350 pages, printed in 
English and French, and will contain : 
The building laws and ordinances, plumb- 
ing and sanitary laws, rules and regula- 
tions, drainage, and sewerage laws of 
Montreal : engineers' rules and reg 
tions, and steam boiler inspection laws 
and ordinances ; building and electric 
glossary of technical terms, and electrical 
rules and information. A list of the 
municipal officers and their office hours. 
Manv tables of daily use and application 
in the trades. It is proposed to have 
the publication ready for distribution to 
the trade in about six weeks. 



BUILDING PERMITS IN OTTAWA. 

During the past week only nine per 
mits were granted at Ottawa, the aggre 
gate value of which was $14,250. The 

m. t>rii\ of permits wan tar extensions 

to resiliences. The following is the list : 
I) Skuce, brick - veneered dwelling on 
Maria street $800 : F. McCullough, ad 
dition to brick dwelling. Waller Streel 
$350 • R Strothers. solid brick dwelling. 
Cambridge street. $3,500; W. (> Hugh 
son solid brick stables and coach house. 
Sparks street. $1,500 : Charles Living, 

brick veneered dwelling. Peter street, for 
y> 500 • J Wilson, for brick addition to 
dwelling, Lisgar street. $400 ; J. Gor 
mullv o'ii' 1 brick addition to dwelling. 
Dab avenue. $1,200 : John Kehoe solid 
brick shops. Besscerer street. $2,000; 
David MacLaren. solid brick addition t" 
house and also stable. Frank street, tor 
$2,000. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



39 



WINDOW 



A 




ooth 



Cuts 



Copper Co., Limited 



^We have good stocks on hand, all in prime 
condition, Window Glass, Picture Glass, Double 
Glass, 26-oz., 32-oz. Rolled Glass, Ornamental 
Glass, Stained, Enamelled and Embossed Glass. 
Send us your specification for Star and other 
Glass. 



A. RAMSAY & SON EST'D 

MONTREAL 1842 



GLASS IMPORTERS 
PAINT MAKERS 



Copper and Brass 



SHEETS— TUBES— RODS 



to any size. 



FULL STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND. 
PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 



The BOOTH COPPER CO., Limited 



119=123 Queen St. East, 

TORONTO 



REED'S PIPE STOCKS 



#' 

\ * ^ 

& «# 

f 



AND DIES. 






The Reed Pipe Dies embody all the good 
features of any Solid Dies. The sections or cut- 
ting bits are made of high-grade English Steel 
that is particularly adopted to thread-cutting pur- 
poses. Anyone who has had experience in tem- 
pering steel will understand the advantage in 
making the cutting bits separate, as shown in the 
accompanying illustration, and thereby insuring 
more even and durable cutting qualities than 
possible in a Solid Block Die. 



is 




SEND FOR CATALOGUES AND PRICES. 



The Fairbanks Company 

MONTREAL and VANCOUVER. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA. 



40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



/ \ 

MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLY 

DEPARTMENT 



NEW TYPE OF STORAGE BATTERY. 



IN an article entitled " The Storage 
Battery and the Motor Car," Thomas 
A. Edison gives further information as 
to the new type of storage battery upon 
which he is working. The tests applied 
point to the new nickel-iron battery as being 
in fact the only real storage battery known. 
A real storage battery must be reversible, 
lake a dynamo, which converts power into 
electricity, and vice versa. A storage bat- 
tery, to deserve the name, should be a per- 
fectly reversible instrument, receiving and 
giving out power like a dynamo motor, 
without any deterioration of the mechanism 
of conversion. The present lead battery in 
an automobile, Mr. Edison alleges, does 
not meet this condition. It gradually be- 
comes less and less efficient, and in a few 
months wholly inoperative. The acid 
environment prevents a proper mechanical 
construction, its chemical reactions are of 
the most capricious character ; it must be 
watched and treated with great care — so 
great care, indeed, as to make it impractic- 
able for general use. It can be made, as 
far as mere weight is concerned, of sufficient 
lightness to meet all the wants of commerce 
and pleasure ; but if made light it rapidly 
becomes useless. 

On the other hand, the nickel - iron 
storage cell has an ideal environment. 
Being in an alkaline solution, none of the 
ingredients is attacked by the solution in 
any degree. The chemical reactions are 
also of the most simple and stable char- 
acter. The conditions permit of a perfect 
mechanical construction, and, finally, it 
remains uninjured under any condition 
which one could imagine, when in the hands 
of an inexpert. The weight can be made 
to meet every exigency of commercial 
vehicle traction, and up to the present time 
there are no signs of chemical deterioration, 
even in a battery which has been charged 
and discharged over 700 times. 

Mr. Edison says he has been working 
for some years on the problem of a true 
storage battery. The experiments have 
been continuous for the past three years. 
The above may be considered the first 
stage. 

Tests on the battery have been going on 
for over a year and a half ; this was the 



second stage. The construction of chemical 
works and a manufacturing plant for the 
cells was the third stage. The manufac- 
ture of standard cells from the tools is the 
fourth stage. 

Twenty-one cells made in the factories, 
weighing 332 lb., were placed in a Baker 
automobile, the total weight with two men 
in the vehicle being 1,075 lb. The vehicle 
made a run, on one charge, of 62 miles 
over country roads, containing many grades, 
some as steep as 12 ft; in 100. At the end 
of this run the vehicle was making 83 per 
cent, of the original speed. The average 
speed over the entire distance was 11.2 
miles per hour. On a comparatively level 
country road, a little heavy from recent 
rain, the same vehicle, on one charge, 
came to a stop at the 85th mile. 

The fifth endurance test of the nickel - 
iron battery, which is demonstrating that the 
storage battery is indeed an accomplished 
act, is now being made with five different 
models of automobiles, in each of which 
the new cells have been installed. They 
are of various weights and construction, 
and each of them is being run 5,000 miles 
over country roads, at an average distance 
of 100 miles per day. If these tests shall 
show no loss of capacity and no mechanical 
defect in the battery, and that it is in all 
respects exactly the same at the end as at 
the commencement, we can be reasonably 
assured'that at last we have a real storage 
battery. 

Mr. Edison expresses the conviction that 
the storage battery carriage, by the aid 
of the new battery, will come ultimately 
within the reach of the man of moderate 
means. Driving through the many miles 
of streets in the suburbs of New York, he 
has been impressed with the fact that some- 
thing like 80 per cent, of the residences have 
no carriage houses. The storage battery 
carriage, with the new battery, should enable 
the owners of 40 per cent, of these resi- 
dences to have a serviceable pleasure 
vehicle at their beck and call, without hiring 
a coachman to keep it clean and run it, with 
no horses.to eat their heads off, and no oats 
and hay to buy. With an initial outlay of 
from $700 and upward, the storage battery 
automobile can be used once a week at the 



cost of a 50c. charge, or twice for $1, and 
so on, the cost of use being met as it is 
incurred, and so ceasing to be the bugbear 
that fixed charges must always be to the 
householder of moderate income. For safe 
and successful use the automobile must, 
however, be made with heavier running 
gear, on the lines of the later French 
automobiles. Especially should stability 
be secured in the wheels and frame ; the 
superstructure may be made gauzy. It seems 
likely that two general types of electric car- 
riage will be developed, a light buggy type 
and a heavier touring carriage, the battery 
varying accordingly. The question of types 
of automobiles is further discussed, and the 
conclusion arrived at that the electric car- 
riage of the future, and of the near future, 
will not only supersede other types of auto- 
mobiles, but it will be built and run on such 
practical lines that accidents will soon 
become things of the past. 

THE CONTRACTS ARE AWARDED. 

The following contracts were awarded 
this week for the factory building that is to 
be erected for The Deering Harvester Co., 
of Chicago, in Hamilton : Mr. George 
F. Webb, brickwork ; Mr. James Findlay, 
roofing ; Stamp & Co., painting. The 
contract price amounts to a little over 
#100,000. A couple of days ago the 
Hamilton Bridge Company was given the 
contract for the steel work in connection 
with the building, the price being between 
$12,000 and $13 000. 

AUTOMOBILE FIRE ENGINE. 

An automobile fire engine is being 
brought out, in which the power that drives 
the pumps can alternatively be applied to 
propel the engine through the streets to the 
place where its services are required. A 
machine of this type has been in successful 
use for some two years in Mauritius ; but in 
the present instance a further advance has 
been made by the adoption of liquid fuel, 
which seems to present distinct advantages 
for this kind of work, not only on account 
of the ease with which it can be manipu- 
lated, but also because the amount that can 
be stored in a given space will yield con- 
siderably more power than the same amount 
of coal. Steam can be raised from cold 
water, in a very few minutes, and if, as is 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



41 



WANTED-- 



AN AGENT 
TO SELL 



Stocks, Dies and Taps and other En- 
gineers' Hand Tools and Platelayers' 
Tools to Hardware Factors, Railroad 
Companies and Mines, on a commission 
basis. Apply, 

/.asterbrook, Allcard & CO., 

LIMITED. 
SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 



ORE BUCKETS. 

13052— Iron Ore Bucket, 24 in. x 30 in. x 36 in. high. 

WEIGH SCALES. 

14861— Planer Knife Balance Scales. 
14942— 2,000-lb. Platform Scales. 
12821— 1,200-lb. " " 

13=06— 240-lb. " " 

GRIST MILL MACHINES. 

16121— 20-in. Waterous Chopper and Elevator. 
16123— Two-R ill Grain Grinder. 
10822— No. 3 Raymond Cnopper. 
14963— Three Roll Chop Mill. 



SAUSAGE MACHINES. 

No. 12024B— Buffalo Sausage Stufier. 
No. 12027B-" Simplex " Sausage Machine. 
No. 15832^0-lb. Knowles Meat Chopper. 
No. 15902— 20-Ib. " " " 

DROP HAMMERS. 

No. 16163- New 125-lb. Drop Hammer. 

No. 15342— Small Trip Hammer. 

No. 15919— 8C-10. Scranton Power Hammer. 

Canadian Agent for Jewel Automatic and Centre Crank 
Engines. Write for Stock Lists and Prices. 

H. W. PETRIE, 141-145 Front St. W., Toronto 




Blacksmiths' 



Drills. 



The very 
best. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER. 

U.S. Patent June 25th, 1895 Canadian Patent December lSih, 1894 




^aut, vo^f 



Made by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. A. R WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ont. 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices 




James Warnock & Co, 



Gait, Ont. 



6. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 




SARNIA, ONT. 



LIMITED 



I Manufacturers of' 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 



STANYON ENGINEERING CO. 



Phone Main 2177. 



402 MCKINNON BUILDING, 



-TORONTO 

CONTRACTING AND CONSULTING ENGINEERS. 

Steel Works, all kinds of Rolling Mills, Wire, Mills, etc., all built complete. Machinery designed forany purpose 
General Offices, - PITTSBURG, Pa. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York : 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. 



Galvanized Plain Wire. 



Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 



42 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



frequently done, the water in the boiler is 
kept warm while the engine is standing in 
the fire station by means of a ring of gas 
jets, the petroleum burner can get up a full 
head of steam (120 lb. per square inch) in 
one minute. The vehicle is controlled from 
the front by a throttle valve, reversing 
lever, and foot brake, and, although its 30 
horse-power engines enable it to attain a 
high speed and its weight complete ap- 
proaches three tons, it can be stopped dead 
in a few yards. 

DO NOT OVERWORK A BATTERY. 

The life of the storage battery depends 
on the amount of work it is required to do 
within a given time, and the cost of main- 
tenance is governed greatly by the rate of 
discharge at which it is operated. When 
the rate of discharge exceeds a given 
amount for a cell of certain size the chemical 
action is so great that the plates are 
soon destroyed or so rapidly deteriorated 
that they waste away in such a manner that 
the loose particles and the pieces which 
break off soon cause a short circuit between 
the plates that ruins the cell for use until it 
is removed. 

These things are the source of dissatifac- 
tion in the use of cells in the hands of those 
who are not fully informed as to their char- 
acteristics, or who think that the rated dis- 
charge can be exceeded with impunity, 
thereby endeavoring to get out of the cell 
more than it was ever intended to stand. 
Such reckless usage soon ruins the cell, as 
the same kind of practice would soon 
destroy any kind of machinery or any device 
of mechanical or chemical construction. 

MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES. 

It is reported that 35 machinists are on 
the way from Scotland to take the places of 
strikers in the Kingston Locomotive Works. 

The McLachlan Gasoline Engine Co., 
Limited, 201 Queen street, east, Toronto, 
are sending a 22-ft. boat, fully equipped 
with canopy, cushions and curtains, to Bay 
St. Louis, Miss. 

The Toronto Electrical Works Company, 
Adelaide west, Toronto, have sold one of 
their % horse power machines of their new 
design to the J. F. Brown Company. The 
machine will be used to run a sewing 
machine. 

The C.P.R. took formal control of the 
Hull Electric Railway last Friday. The 
purchase of the Hull electric line is really a 
part of the acquisition by the C.P.R. of the 
Gatineau and Pontiac Railways, which were 
amalgamated with the electric line. The 
three lines cost the C.P.R. in the neighbor- 
hood of $700,000. 



A POWERFUL ENGINE. 

ONE of the most powerful engines 
ever built for driving a" dynamo 
has been completed by an engineer- 
ing firm of Leeds, Eng., and is to be utilized 
in connection with the municipal electric 
lighting plant of that city. It is, as de- 
scribed by Scientific American, of the verti- 
cal double-acting triple-expansion type, and 
every part is inclosed. The three cylinders 
are at the top of the structure and have 
respectively diameters of 23 in. (high pres- 
sure). 35 in. (intermediate) and 55 in. (low 
pressure). The length of the stroke is 30 
in., the shaft on which the cranks are set at 
120 deg. is 12 in. in diameter, while the 
total height from bedplate to top is 22 ft., 
and it is designed to make from 200 to 250 
revolutions of the crankshaft per minute. 
Some fine castings have been employed in 
its construction, notably the bedplate, which 
measures 21 x 8 ft. and weighs 16 tons. 
The casing is cast in two pieces and weighs 
22 tons, while the low-pressure cylinder 
weighs q% tons. The total weight of the 
complete engine is 105 tons. The cylinders 
are fitted with slide valves, and are self- 
draining. The forced system of lubrication 
is employed. The oil is supplied to all the 
working parts by a pump without valves or 
packing, driven from the crankshaft, which 
discharges the oil at a pressure of 10 to 25 
lb. per square inch through specially de- 
signed oil channels. The oil that escapes 
from the bearings drains into the crankpit, 
and is used again. The engine is coupled 
direct to a dynamo with a normal output of 
1,400 kilowatts, but capable of generating 
1,540 kilowatts. The steam pressure of the 
engine is 200 lb. maximum per square inch, 
developing 2,500 indicated horse-power. 

A NEW PLANING MACHINE. 

A Cincinnati firm has placed on the 
market a new and improved planing 
machine with single cylinder. The planes 
are 24, 27 and 30 in. wide, and 6 in. thick. 
Feed is driven from cylinders ; is powerful, 
steady and uniform, and under instant con- 
trol of friction clutch convenient to operator. 
They have a patent sectional feeding-in roll 
in four sections, with each section centre - 
geared and gear driving downward. Each 
section independently raises and lowers far 
variation in thickness of work. This 
arrangement allows of the working of stock 
varying % in. in thickness. The planer 
has as well four powerfully driven feed rolls, 
upper feeding out one raising parallel for 
different thicknesses. Rolls have sectional 
weights, insuring at all times perfect pres- 
sure on material. The bar before cut is 
sectional to correspond with feeding-in roll; 
bar after-cut is adjustable by hand-wheel. 
Bed is substantial and easily raises and 



lowers. Cylinder is of improved construc- 
tion for assuring smooth and even work. 
All adjustments are easily, quickly and 
accurately made. 

MACHINE FOR LAYING BRICK. 

F. S. S. Johnson, of Stanbridge, Que 
reports a recent invention, which consists of 
bricklaying by machinery instead of by 
hand. He says : "The machine, worked 
by two men and a lad, will lay 400 to 600 
bricks per hour. Door and window spaces 
cause only a slight delay. The machine is 
suited for all plain work, such as walls, 
sheds, mills, factories, rows of cottages, 
piers of bridges, etc. Considerable pressure 
is put on the bricks, and it is claimed that 
the work is more firmly done than by hand. 
The invention will do the work of six or 
seven skilled bricklayers, and it is believed 
that a machine adapted to build a factory 
covering about 60 by 40 feet could be put 
on the market for #5co. The apparatus 
can be readily worked after a fortnight's 
instruction." 



"SLICK" OIL CANS. 

IN this number, Hardware and Metal 
produces a cut of the " Slick" oil can 
made by The Kemp Manufacturing 
Co. This oil can possesses some very 
special advantages. It can fill a lantern or 
a lamp in the dark much more easily than 
an ordinary can is able by day. This oil 
can entirely obviates any difficulties so 
frequently met with in the case of an ordi- 
nary can, filling a lantern or a lamp with a 




metal font. It completely removes the risk 
of spilling oil, or soiling clothes, or dirtying 
lamps, as it is impossible with the "Slick " 
oil can to overflow the article when the 
tubes extend into the opening. The pump 
is attached in the simplest and strongest 
manner possible, and is detached by turning 
half way around. It is well nigh impossible 
for it to get out of order with ordinary use, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



43 




rthur, Corneille & Co. 



MONTREAL 

a Manufacturers and Importers of . . . 




White Lead, 

Oils and Colors, 

Prepared Paints, 
Window Glass, 

Varnishes, etc. 



GlLJe and 

©elating 

In extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 
PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

ENGLISH VARNISHES 

Of CHAS TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shlngleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cablet 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

■ ■ Limited 

Weatera Ontarle Representative— 

wh. b. stewart. MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel 94. IT Front St. Waat. TORONTO. 




Winning Favor in Australia 

"The engineering merchants here consider your Solid Box Blacksmiths' 
Vises superior in quality and workmanship to any they have ever handled. 
They say they are remarkably suitable, and give perfect satisfaction." 

[Extract from letter received from our Australian Agents located in Melbourne.] 



Our facilities are unexcelled for making 



Blacksmiths' and Machinists' Vises 

Modern equipment and methods, high-grade material and workmanship 
are combined in our plant, producing 

THE BEST VISES MADE 



Lamplough & McHaughton 



CANADIAN SALES AGENTS 



19 De Bresolcs St., Montreal 
Manufactured by 



THE COLUMBIAN HARDWARE COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

NEW CATALOGUE JUST ISSUED WRITE FOR IT. 




44 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE TRACTOR IN LUMBERING OPERATIONS. 



THE roads in the hill country of Cali- 
fornia, Oregon and Washington, 
where are located the principal 
lumbering camps, are in a very crude con- 
dition, most of them having no paved sur- 
face, while the grades are extremely steep 
in many instances. Much of the formation 
is of a red clay, which in wet weather is 
turned into liquid mud, through which an 
ordinary wagon can scarcely be forced, al- 
though three or four horses or mules may 
be attached to it. Loose stones falling from 
the hill sides increase the difficulty of travel 
over these mountain highways, so that 
where animal power is used, double and 
treble the ordinary number of teams are 
required to "freight" lumber or other 
material from the woods to the mills or the 
railroad stations. 

For the purpose of substituting steam 
power for animals, the Holt Brothers, of 
Stockton, the inventors of the farm tractors, 
have designed a powerful engine, which 
accomplishes remarkable results where it 
has been placed in service. The sizes range 
from 40 to 60 horse power. The driving 
wheels have tires comparatively narrow, 
from 18 to 24 inches in width with corru- 
gated or roughened surface, in order to give 
them more traction upon the highways. 
Power is communicated to the driving 
wheels by roller chains on each side of the 
truck, which revolve about aft axle which is 
driven by two sprocket wheels, also con- 
nected by roller chains with the engine. 
The tractor is guided or steered by a smaller 
front wheel, which is connected with a hand 
wheel by a sprocket chain, so that the 
motorman can turn it in any direction 
desired merely by using the strength of one 
hand. Most of the engines are provided 
with a steel drum upon the forward end of 
the truck frame. Upon this is reeled a 
wire rope or heavy manila cable, kept for 
the purpose of hauling when the tractor may 
be detached from the cars of logs or mater- 
ial to be transported. 

On a level surface the motor will readily 
pull a train of trucks loaded with lumber 
weighing from 200 to 250 tons without diffi- 
culty. On the highway it can attain a 
speed of from 8 to 10 miles an hour, if 
desired. 

It is used, however, in the forests where 
no highways exist, for transporting logs 
from the stump lots to the mills or the rail- 
road stations. In this case the logs are 
usually chained together.sometimes mounted 
upon rollers, and then attached to the 
tractor, which pulls them to their destination 
by the most convenient route. Such is the 
strength exerted that it can actually be 



forced through bushes and over young trees 
5 and 6 ft. in height, while being able to 
turn in a circle of 150 ft., it can be guided 
in and out among the trees. It will haul in 
this way a dozen large trunks, a single one 
of which would require the strength of 10 or 
12 horses or mules to move ordinarily. 

The ordinary highways have such steep 
ascents that frequently the tractor can reach 
the summit only by being separated from the 
trucks or cars which it is drawing. The 
drum, or cable, is used to haul its load to 
the top of the hill. The cable is unwound, 
fastened to the cars or trucks at the bottom, 
and the tractor converted into a stationary 
engine, exerting all its power upon the rope. 
In this way, trips can be made over routes 
which are literally impassable for waggons. 
Another great difficulty encountered, espe- 
cially in California, is sand. This is partly 
overcome, also, by the broadness of the 
tires, which prevent the engine, in spite of 
its weight, from sinking into the surface of 
the road to such an extent as to become 
stalled. 

The type of tractor, says The Scientific 
American, used especially in lumbering and 
mining operations is what is termed the 
freighting engine, and weighs from 14 to 21 
tons when equipped and ready for service. 
It will consume about 225 lb. of coal per 
hour when working at its full capacity, or 
about one ton daily, while its consumption 
of water is about 300 gals, per hour. 

Since the use of oil in industries on the 
Pacific Coast has extended into Oregon and 
Washington, some of the tractors have 
been fitted with apparatus for burning oil in 
place of coal. It is calculated that one will 
utilize about 28 gallons of the ordinary oil 
hourly when in service. The boilers fur- 
nished are of two types — corrugated flue 
and water-leg. In freighting outfits a 
smaller force of hands is required than in 
farming operations with the tractor. The 
larger types have an engineer and fireman 
if coal is used. The latter may also act as 
trainman, coupling and uncoupling the cars 
when necessary, so that really only two 
men are required to transport the material. 
As a substitute for horse drills In planting 
seed, the motor has been very successful, 
accomplishing 20 to 30 times as much at a 
time as two or three teams of the heaviest 
draught horses. 

Calculations made of the economy of 
operating with the tractor show that it will 
plow and harrow, seed and harvest a certain 
area at about one-sixth of what it costs 
when men and horses are used. Lumber- 
men who have tested it for freighting pur- 
poses estimate that the cost is about one- 



third of the sum expended when teams are 
employed. In these estimates the fuel and 
water and repairs are all carefully estimated 
and deducted. 



WHALEN PLANER TOOL. 

A new combination planer tool is being 
put on the United States market. Il*"is 
formed with an apron and tool block, and 
is provided with a turret movement that 
works in the end of the shank. It will cut 
in any position desired, across a surface, 
down the sides, and do right or left under- 
cutting. In order to set the turret, the nut in 
rear is loosened and the thumb nut at the 
side screwed down. The latter operation 
withdraws the locking pin, leaving the 
turret free to be set in any position. The 
main object of the tool is to do away with 
the lifting or dragging of large and heavy 
tools on the return stroke when planing side 
work or undercutting. It is particularly 
useful for planing slots in the side of a piece 
where a side head cannot be used to good 
advantage. 



A GOLDEN WEDDING. 

IT has not fallen to the lot of many of our 
subscribers to have the privilege or the 
opportunity of attending golden wed- 
dings. Mr. S B. Noble, hardware mer- 
chant, St. Catharines ; C. E. Noble, hard- 
ware merchant, Dundalk, and Rev. S G. 
Noble, of Rural Valley, Pennsylvania, and 
Mrs. Marshall (sister), Niagara street, 
Toronto, started on July 15, via C.P.R., 
to attend the golden wedding of their 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Noble, of 
Oxbow, Assa.. N.W.T. 

Mr. and Mrs. Noble, senior, were married 
in 1852 and made their home near the place 
where the flourishing town of Dundalk is, but 
which was at that time a howling wilderness. 
They spent over 40 years clearing up the 
farm, going to the West nearly 10 years ago. 
Like most people in a new country they were 
blessed with a large family, six sons and six 
daughters, all living and well but one 
daughter. Of the 1 1 children living, 7 are 
in the West. Messrs. A. B. and C. E. 
Noble, who have been subscribers to 
Hardware and Metal for many years, 
know well the trials and hardships that 
young people in the early days had to 
endure. They did not have the privilege 
and opportunity of receiving even a good 
common school or business education, but 
what little they got they made good use of. 
Mr. A. B. Noble carried on a successful 
business for 20 years at Shelburne, and has 
by his energy, push and ambition built up 
a fine business, and has the best store in 
the Niagara Peninsula. Mr. C. E. Noble 
has also made a success, and enjoys the 
reputation of being a good business man. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



45 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

* LONDON, ONT. 



Our stock of goods for the spring trade is 
now complete, and we can fill all orders promptly 
on the following lines : 

Wire, IS ails, Cordage, Window 
Glass, White Lead, Paints, Whit- 
ing, Churns, Linseed Oil, Spades 
and Shovels, Screen Doors, Wove 
Wire, Poultry /Setting, Builders' 
Hardware, Guns and Sporting 
Goods. Finest stock in the 
Province of Cutlery. 

Prompt Shipment. Prices Right. 



DOMINION 

Wire Manufacturing Company, Limited 



Head Office 

MONTREAL 

Que. 



Annealed, 

Oiled and Annealed, 

Bright, 

Bright Spring, 

Coppered, 

Coppered Spring, 

Brass, Brass Spring, 

Copper, Tinned and 

Galvanized WIRES. 







Branch Office 

V; TORONTO 

Ont. 



Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws. 
Jack Chain. 
Cotter Pins. 
Bright Wire Goods. 
Door Pulls. 
" Crescent " 
Coat and Hat Hooks 
Tinned Bottling 
Wires. 



Fence, Poultry Netting, Bed and Blind Staples. 

COPPER AND GALVANIZED WIRE 

For Telegraph and Telephone Lines. 



.v* C "X 




IF YOU ARE HANDLING SILVERWARE 



you must surely be interested in STANDARD SILVERWARE, 

for it represents THE BEST in Canada to-day. 

We have a standing offer to take back at par value any 
imperfect goods bearing our brand. Could anything be fairer 
than this ? 



Beauty of Design and Perfect Quality is our Motto. 

It seems early yet to talk about Christmas orders, but 
already we are beginning to feel the throb in the pulse of this 
trade and very soon it will be " all rush." Let us advise you 
to secure the pick of our stock before this rush begins. It 
doesn't cost any more, and is much more satisfactory all round. 

II Big Catalogue full of illustrations and trade news sent free for the asking. 

STANDARD SILVER CO., -„„ 

31-43 llayter Street, TORONTO 



t 
t 



46 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT AND THE JOBBER. 



By Arthur S 

MANUFACTURER is defined by 
Webster as "a person engaged in 
the business of working raw ma- 
terials into wares for use." 

Agent is defined by the same authority 
as " one intrusted with the business of 
another," as an attorney, a minister, a 
deputy, a factor. In law agent implies a 
kind of service in which the one serving has 
some discretion as to the manner of accom- 
plishing the object. Hence the manufac- 
turers' agent is a complex or composite 
type of representative, and may be either 
an itinerant salesman or local broker. Now 
that we have established the character and 
province of the agent, we must fix his rela- 
tionship to the manufacturer and the jobber, 
and the first question we will ask ourselves, 

IS HE A NECESSITY ? 

From the time of the first commercial 
transaction the travelling man has played 
an important part in the history of the world, 
and has been a potent factor in the distri- 
bution of manufactured products ; first, as 
the representative of the manufacturer to 
the jobber, and then the jobber to the 
retailer, and in Great Britain to.day, under 
the name or title of factor, he represents 
the manufacturer direct to the retailer. This 
condition does not prevail to any extent in 
this country as yet, but as our country be- 
comes more densely populated, we may 
expect that it will. You would hardly deny 
that the manufacturers' agent is a necessity, 
because the trade conditions prevailing to- 
day would disprove the assertion. The 
experiences of the past twenty years have 
certainly established his value. Throughout 
this broad land there are distributed manu- 
facturers of more or less importance, each 
of whom is entitled to certain representation, 
on the shelves of every jobber engaged in 
the sale of hardware. In years gone by, 
when the product of the manufacturer bore 
to him a profit of from 50 to 75 per cent., 
and to the jobber of 100 or more per cent., 
the small manufacturef could well afford to 
employ his 

INDIVIDUAL REPRESENTATIVE 

to visit the trade and pay him well for his 
services ; but in the evolution that has 
taken place in the last decade conditions 
have so changed and profits have been so 
reduced that he can no longer afford the 
necessary outlay of travelling expenses and 
salary, notwithstanding the fict that the 
goods he manufactures and offers the trade 
possess the same merit and are of the same 
high standard. Naturally, the smaller 
manufacturer was the first to realize the 

"Paper read before the Southern Hardware Association. 



Jones, Memphis, Tenn. 



value of the manufacturers' agent, but it 
was not long after that the larger and more 
pretentious ones perceived the necessity of 
curtailing their expenses, and out of this 
very necessity, and others equally as impor- 
tant, arose the manufacturers' agent. It is 
estimated that 65 per cent, of the hardware 
and other kindred lines manufactured in 
America is sold through the individual 
efforts of the 

manufacturer' agent, 
or broker, as he is sometimes called, and, 
as a further proof of his potency, it is only 
necessary to assure you that a very consid- 
erable proportion of our wares sold in 
foreign countries are handled through his 
agency. If these statistics are not mis- 
guiding, his worth, then, to the manufac- 
turer is conclusively shown, and it only 
remains to establish and fix his relation to 
the jobber. 

Our authority defines a jobber as " one 
who buys of the manufacturer or importer 
and sells to the retailer." 

The success, then, of the jobber is de- 
pendent on the amount of profit derived 
from the sale of his wares. If all manufac- 
turers were in a position to 

DICTATE A SCHEDULE 

of selling prices, as we find in some lines 
to-day, the jobber's profit would no longer 
be governed by his ratio of expenses, but 
fixed and dictated by a higher power. 
Many factories now being represented by 
manufacturers' agents, if they were com- 
pelled to pay the travelling expenses and 
salary of a representative of the same stand- 
ing, would be forced to either advance 
prices, reduee the quality of their goods, 
or, in the extreme, abandon the field 
entirely. The ultimate result of this would 
be the pooling of interests. Competition 
would be strangled — higher prices would 
prevail — selling schedules be dictated, and 
the jobber's profit reduced. The manufac- 
turers' agent's success lies in his ability to 
handle his various accounts and do justice 
to each. 

The successful agent is specially endowed 
with a knowledge and gift, which not only 
applies to his salesmanship, but that of his 
ability to impress those with whom he comes 
in contact favorably. 

In this he is of an advantage to the man- 
ufacturer and a convenience to the jobber. 



Boyce's Hustler, and said : " My son, in 
a few years I wish you to take my place and 
continue the business I have established. I 
think all the world of you, and there is 
nothing I would not sacrifice for your benefit. 
The first thing necessary for you in con- 
ducting the business is experience. If I 
could buy experience for you I would glacfc/ 
pay $100,000. I would not hesitate a 
minute. But since the world began no 
man has been entitled to start in at the top. 
If you are to make a success it is necessary 
for you to give careful attention to every 
feature of the business you expect to man- 
age. You must begin at the bottom and 
spend several weeks in each department of 
every kind of work so as to learn for your- 
self how to do the things which you tell 
others to do. No one is fit to manage until 
he has himself been managed. Whenever 
you read about a house continuing in pros- 
perous business through several generations 
you may be sure that the successive proprie- 
tors started in at the bottom and learned 
how to do the things they afterwards told 
others to do." 



BEGIN AT THE BOTTOM. 

A successful business man sent his son to 
college, and when the young man graduated 
the father called him into his office, relates 



A MERCHANT KNIGHTED. 

Sir Robert Boak, as President of the 
Legislative Council, has done much service 
for the Province of Nova Scotia, and 
deserves his knighthood. 

Sir Robert was born in Leith, Scotland, 
on September 19, 1822. His father, 
Robert Boak, of Shields, in the county of 
Durham, Eng., on his retirement from the 
army, became an officer in Her Majesty's 
Customs in Halifax in 1837, and retained 
that position until he was superannuated. 

The present knight came to Halifax with 
his father in 1831, and in 1847 became a 
member of the firm of John Esson & Co., 
wholesale grocers. In 1854, he retired 
from that firm and formed the firm of 
Esson, Boak & Co., and engaged in the 
West-Indian trade. In 1864 this latter 
firm was dissolved, and he then continued 
business in his own name, and under the 
firm style of Robert Boak & Son, until 
1875, when he retired from business. Sir 
Robert became a member of the Legislative 
Council in 1872, his commission as M.L.C. 
being dated February 20 ; on March 20, 
1878, he was appointed president of that 
body. He was a member of the Govern- 
ment and treasurer of the Province from 
December 1877 to October 1878. 

It will be seen that Sir Robert Boak has 
been for 30 years a Legislative Councillor, 
24 of which he has presided over the 
second chamber. His services well entitle 
him to be marked out for the honor of 
knighthood now conferred. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



47 





LOCkS and 

Builders' Hardware. 

We have a most complete line of all these goods, including the 
very newest ideas in 

Bronze and Brass Knobs, 

Door Sets and Escutcheons. 

LOCKS AND LATCHES OF ALL KINDS. 

Any dealer asking for a catalogue will be sent full prices, discount sheets, etc., etc. Drop a card. 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 



itf^fjfo 



INCORPORATED 1893. 



Tnc Garney-Tilden Co#, L 

Hamilton. Toronto. Montreal. 



MITED 



AGENCIES:— ST. JOHN, N. B., VANCOUVER, B. C. 



Boeckh's 
Brushes, 
Brooms, 

and 

Cane's 
Wooden- 
ware. 



CUSTOMER 
SATISFIED 

DEALER 
GRATIFIED 





This is always the case with dealers handling our goods, because they 
never fail to give splendid margins of profits and the most perfect satisfaction. 
We are now offering better values than ever in 

KITCHEINWARE Brooms ' B ™shes, Pails, Tubs, Towel 

Rollers, Racks, Can Openers, Carpet 

Whips, Wooden Spoons, Rolling Pins, Potato Mashers, Pastry 
Boards, Chopping Trays, Bread Boards, Pie Plates, Self- Wringing 
Mops, Mop Holders, Clothes Wringers, Tub Stands, Washing 
Machines, Clothes Horses, Etc. 

Dealers and consumers know, in purchasing these goods, that they have 
articles that will cause them no trouble whatever. 

If our representative does not visit your town, write us, and we will, if 
possible, arrange for him to call upon you, or we will send you quotations and 
full particulars of these goods by mail. 



UNITED FACTORIES, Limited, 



OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 



Head Office : Toronto. 



LONDON WAREHOUSE, 
65 Dundas Street. 



48 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



How to Succeed. 

A Business Man's "View. 




AN address was recently delivered in 
London, Eng., before a gather- 
ing of young men. The speaker 
was a well-known business man, and his 
remarks were so interesting and valuable 
that " Hardware and Metal " lakes 
pleasure in reproducing a few of the most 
pointed of them : 

YOUTH IS YOUR PRESENT GLORIOUS 
POSSESSION 

Value it. It is a time of vision — when we 
build our castles, and weave our roman- 
ces, and dream our dreams ; but it is 
also a time of possibility, of special op- 
portunity, of enthusiasm, of quickened 
and unbounded life, when our characters 
are formed, and our destinies are deter- 
mined. For, although I believe " there 
is a divinity that shapes our ends," I 
also believe that we ourselves have much 
to do in shaping our ends and determin- 
ing our destiny. 

And with this consciousness, I want for 
a few minutes to stand with you upon 
life's threshold, and to ask the ques- 
tion, " What are you going to make of 
life ? How can you succeed ? " For, I 
take it, we shall be in general agreement 
when I submit that it should be the re- 
solute determination of every young man 
to succeed in li'e. He should early form 
a lofty and noble purpose, and then pur- 
sue it with persevering and courageous 
tenacity. A drifting, aimless life is a 
sorry spectacle. A youth without a defin- 
ite aim is like a ship upon the ocean 
without rudder or compass, at the mercy 
of Che wild tempestuous sea. It is im- 
possible to overestimate the importance 
of having 

A WELL-DEKINED NOHI.Y CONCEIVE] I AIM 

Let our aspirations soar high. We may 
probably fall short of them, but it is 
gloriously possible that we may rise 
above them, and it is absolutely certain 
that the higher our ideal the higher will 
be our life. 

Rut supposing we have formed a life 
purpose, and that it is worthy of our 
best powers of mind and heart, the ques- 
tion naturally arises : How is success to 
be attained ? 

Well, first of all, it is not to be attained 
by merely desiring it. We do well to fix 
this in our mind as an unalterable fact. 
Visions never evolve into fulfillment ex- 
cept as they are translated into the prac- 
tical details of daily duty. No man ever 
yet became successful by dreamingly con- 

Uiplai ing his ideal. 



Nor is success secured by spasmodic 
effort. Dash and brilliance may captivate 
and dazzle, and suggest in the minds of 
some great promise, but observation and 
experience show that permanent success 
is not achieved by fitful and capricious 
endeavor. There is no royal road to suc- 
cess. The road we have to travel is the 
highway of life, which is the common 
heritage of all mankind. 

So then for our encouragement let us 
remember that 

SUCCESS IS POSSIBLE TO ALL. 

There is an open competition for the 
world's prizes. It is not, however, ab- 
solutely certain that we shall attain suc- 
cess. Many worthy and good men fail— 
we may ; but it is nevertheless our duty 
as well as our right to strive for it, and 
to do all within our power to secure it. 
'Tis not in mortals to command success, 
But we'll do m-ve .... deserve it. 

Let us see that if we do not succeed 
the fault shall not b,e ours. 

I have closely observed young men for 
nearly 30 years, and have mixed intimate- 
ly with them during that period spent in 
the heart of city life. I have seen men 
succeed, and I have seen men fail. And 
in most, if not in all cases, success has 
been achieved or failure experienced 
through circumstances largely within the 
control of the individuals themselves. 

First, I would suggest that no man is 
likely to succeed who does not throw his 
heart and soul into his work. 

HAI.K-HEARTEDNESS IS FATAL TO SUCCESS. 

Said one to me who had attained great 
proficiency in the art of elocution, " The 
secret is to lose yourself in the piece that 
you are rendering." And so it is. 

The reason why many young men do 
not make headway is because they lack 
spirit and grit. They appear to manifest 
no interest in what they are doing, and 
perform their duties in a listless, apathe- 
tic way. It is with them, so much work 
for so much wage. Not how much, but 
how little they can do. Their thought 
is rather for the hour of leaving the 
office or warehouse than to excel in the 
duties entrusted to them. How can such 
reasonably expect promotion or advance- 
ment . ? or be surprised when they are 
passed over and others selected ? No, 
depend upon it, life's prizes are not thus 
won. We must put our heart and soul 
into our work if we are to succeed in it. 

Self-improvement is another condition 
of success. We do wisely to acquire all 



the knowledge we can of the particular 
work in which we are engaged. There is 
always room for the man of ideas. So 
let us cultivate 

AN INQUIRING MIND 

Be on the alert for information. Not 
be above being told. Let us take painsp* 
do our best, and be ever seeking to fit, 
ourselves for some higher niche. As a 
rule, such men are not overlooked. Let 
us perform our duties faithfully and well, 
not so much for the purpose of securing 
success, as for inward satisfaction, and 
the commendation of our own conscience. 
The conscientious performance of present 
duty is a never - failing preparation for 
some higher sphere. 

Further, in the pursuit of success, punc- 
tuality must be cultivated and exercised. 
An unreliable man cannot expect to suc- 
ceed ; he does not deserve to do so. So 
1 would that we should say to one an- 
other, " Be punctual. Keep your engage- 
ments." It has been well said that 
" Punctuality is the jewel on which the 
whole machinery of successful industry 
may be said to turn." Lord Nelson once 
remarked that he owed all his success in 
life to his being ready for every appoint- 
ment a quarter of an hour beforehand. 

But there is a further point I would 
strongly emphasize, and that is per- 
severance, without which lasting success 
is absolutely impossible. Many men of 
ordinary abilities, by their 

PERSEVERING APPLICATION TO DUTY 

have risen to honorable and distinguished 
positions, while others, possessed of ex- 
ceptional capabilities, through lack of 
this essential quality have failed to 
make their mark in life. It is the man 
who, to use Abraham Lincoln's wise 
maxim, keeps on " pegging away," that 
is most likely to achieve success. Do not 
let us, therefore, be easily discouraged, 
but rather regard every difficulty as an 
obstacle to be overcome, and as a step 
ping-stone to further achievement. Never 
give up. What appears insurmountable 
to-day may be comparatively easy to 
morrow. Do not make the fatal and dis- 
appointing mistake that success is to be 
attained without effort and difficulty. 
You cannot pluck the fruit of success with 
out climbing the tree, and the fruit can- 
not be reached without difficulty oft re- 
peated. 

No man can be really successful unless 
he strives after and cultivates true nobil- 
ity of character. He may win the world's 
prizes, and attain brilliant success, ac- 
cording to the world's verdict, but is is 
the " conscience void of offence toward 
God and man " that will yield real hap- 
piness, and it is the life dominated by 
Christian principles that is the successful 
life indeed. My closing word, therefore, 
is, " Keep your record clean." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



49 




Stove Linings. 



TO THE TRADE: 

Now is the time to look over your stock of 
Stove Linings, Open Grate Backs, Furnace 
Bricks, Range Bricks, Fire Clay, Stove 
Cement, etc., to see that all lines are filled for the 
Fall trade. 

We have a complete stock of all these 
goods always on hand, and can make any special line 
to order on shortest notice. 

Our New Fall Catalogue giving full parti- 
culars may be had for the asking. 

JONES BROS. 

(Near Toronto) BRACONDALE, P. 0. 




Star Safety 
Razor. 

The original and best Safety. 
Shaves Clean Saves Tine Never PulU 



4 Marvel of Simplicity and Durability 

Beware of Imitations. 

The Three Star Safety is the only Safety 
Razor that can be adjusted to a hair's width 
by anybody to suit any face or beard by means 
of adjusting screws, fully protected from in- 
fringers by the U.S. Circuit Court. 




Establish- 
ed 1875. 



For sale by all leading dealers throughout Canada. 
Rock bottom prices upon application to 

KAMPFE BROS., 

INVENTORS AND MANUFACTURERS, 



8 Reade Street 



NEW YORK CITY 




% SMOKELESS OIL HEATERS 



NEW PROCESS 



PRODUCE INTENSE HEAT WITHOUT SMOKE. 

THEY ARE SELF EXTINGUISHING. 

The flame cannot climb up and smoke after the burner becomes heated, 
as on the old styles of oil heaters. 

THEY ARE SAFE AND SIMPLE AS A LAMP IN 

CONSTRUCTION, 

Are provided with a bail with which they can be carried to any part of the house. 
MADE OF SHEET METAL— and are light and durable. 

THE FOUNTS ARE REMOVABLE FOR CLEANING AND FILLING. 

THEY ARE THE MOST POWERFUL HEATERS. 

For Beauty, Simplicity, Convenience and Heating Power, None Excel 
THE IMENA/ F>F?OOESS. 

THE IMPROVED STANDARD HEATER 

Same principle as " New Process," but a cheaper grade. 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. 



Limited, 



MONTREAL. 



50 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax, .July 15. 1902. 

DURING the last week there has 
been considerable falling- off in 
the heavy volume of hardware 
business which has been done during the 
former part of the season. A quiet sea- 
son is not unexpected during July and 
August, ami the hardwaremen are not 
complaining, though there is only the 
ordinary light midsummer business to 
attend to. As in other lines of business 
the employers and staffs are planning 
their vacation trips, which will fill in 
the season until business livens up again. 
There has been another reduction of U'. 
a lb. on manila and sisal, but as this is 
the dull season in all kinds of cordage, 
the change will not be of great benefit, 
except that the stronger financial firms 
may do considerable buying". This may 
not take place yet awhile, as there ap- 
peals to be a prevailing opinion that 
there will be still further reductions in 

the near future. 

* -# * 

The business done in haying tools and 
farm implements has been excessive this 
season, but the trade in this line is now 
abbut over. Builders' hardware is still 
in good demand, though a lighter busi- 
ness is being done than a month ago. 
The hot weather and the approach of rly- 
time induced large sales of wire screens 
and netting, but the demand is now 
about supplied. There has also been a 
good demand in fishing lines, flies, reels 
and rods, but though the fishing season 
is only fairly under way, nearly all the 
sportsmen have renewed their gear for 
the season and the demand is now only 
nominal. This has also been a good 
season for the sale of athletic sporting 
goods. 

The situation in screws, on account of 
recent changes, is not quite satisfactory 
to the hardwaremen. It appears that the 
Canadian Association, having fixed the 
price for selling, has called on the Hali- 
fax jobbers to add the freight to Hali- 
fax. The difference to the' trade here will 
Be considerable. For example: A dealer 
in Amherst buys in Halifax. He has 
virtually to pay the Montreal price, plus 
freight to Halifax, and from Halifax to 
.Am heist, whereas formerly he had only 
the freight of the latter distance to pay. 
It now appears as if it would be cheaper 
fcH' him to buy in Montreal, and Halifax 
will thus he at a disadvantage except in 
trade east of this point. The situation 
with reference to horseshoes is somewhat 
similiar. We understand that the Mari- 
time Association has protested against 
the changes, but with what result we are 
unable to learn. 



somewhat easier, and a 

per gallon is quoted. 



Linseed oil 

reduction of 

Turpentine remains linn. There is only a 

moderate demand for these at present. 
All kinds of illuminating and machine 
oils remain unchanged at former quota- 
tions. 

* * # 

A meeting of the Maritime Hardware 
Association took place at Digby last 
week when uianv matters affecting the 



trade were discussed, only a general 
statement of which can be obtained for 
publication. The Maritime Association 
claims that it is in existence for the pur- 
pose of combating the fixing of high 
prices by the Canadian Association, but 
they no doubt consider, more or less, the 
matter of their own selling price. They 
meet quarterly, and the meetings are 
generally very largely attended by repre- 
sentative firms in the various Maritime 
Provinces. 

* * * 

The exports for last week at this port 
were very large, and the bulk of value 
went in a new direction. The amount is 
$2 1. '5, 858, and is apportioned as follows : 
France, 8139,799 ; Great Britain, $23,756; 
United States, .$22,367 ; West Indies. 
X'.>,7<;2 ; Newfoundland, 88,024 ; Germany. 
86.800 ; Russia, $2,600 ; Italy, $950. The 
large amount exported to France is ac- 
counted for by a very large shipment of 
canned lobsters taken by the steamer 
Manchester Shipper. 

R. C. H. 



TIN PRODUCTION AND CONSUMP- 
TION. 

According to The Engineering and Min- 
ing Journal the total world's production 
of tin in 1901 was '89,878 long tons, as 
against 80.311 tons in 1900 and 73,880 
tons in 1899. As the supply of tin comes 
chiefly from countries in which no accu- 
rate statistics of production are kept, 
estimates are necessarily based largely 
upon trade statistics showing the move- 
ments and consumption of the metal. The 
figures below are compiled chiefly from 
the circular of Messrs. W. T. Sargant k, 
Sons, of London, and from those of 
Richard & Friewald and of De Monchy 
cV. Havelaar. of Rotterdam. These figures 
give approximately the production of tin 
for three years past, in long tons of 
■2:2 III 11). : 

1899. 1900 1901. 
Straits to Europe and United 

States.... 44.5°' 46.058 50.382 

Straits to India and China ... 1,480 1,800 2.650 

Totals, Straits.... 45.981 47,858 53032 

Australian shipments 3.370 2,975 3.276 

Banka, Billiton and Singkep. ... 14935 18,013 19,400 

Bolivian exports 5,000 6,965 9.670 

English production 4,500 4500 4.500 

Total production 73,886 80,311 89,878 

Estimated deliveries 80,900 79,500 87,700 

Surplus *7,oi4 811 2,178 

Estimated stocks 21,572 21505 25,620 

* Deficit. 

In addition to the production given 
above, there i: a small quantity of tin 
ore found in Germany and a little in the 
vicinity of Guadalajara in Mexico. In 
China there is a considerable output, tin" 
amount of which cannot be estimated 
with any accuracy. Although it is not a 
producer, the United States is the largest 
consumer of tin. During 1901 the total 
imports of the metal into this country— 
which are practically the consumption— 
were 3.3.280 long tons, or 37 per cent, of 
the world's production. 'file tin which 
comes here is chiefly Straits tin. part 
being imported directly, though a con- 
siderable share is received by way of 
British ports. Some Banka tin also 
comes here, chiefly by way <>f Holland. 
Great Britain is the second largest con 
sunier of tin, while Germany is the third. 
Holland, while it transacts a large trade 
in tin, consumes only a small quantity, 
most of the metal received from the East 
by the Dutch ports being sold and ree\ 
ported. 



£ 



HOT 

AS 

BLAZES! 



That is what our forging room feels 
like these days. But we have to keep at 
it, hot or cold, to supply the demand for 
"Q" horse nails 

We have completed on the 30th ult., 
another half-year's business, and we are 
now in a position to state, larger than the 
same period last year. The people know 
a good thing in Canada, and they show 
their appreciation of our nail by buying 
more of them every year, and at a better 
price than any of the other fellows can 
get. Of course, they say their nails are 
"JUSt as good," but why don't other 
folks say so, and pay them the same price ? 

Uur "Q" nails are worth more than 
any other horse nail in Canada — bar none. 
We intend to keep them in the front — 
no dropping to the rear rank. 

Don't be one of those fellows who buy 
"cheap" nails, and worst of all those 
blind "Yankee seconds." Fight shy of 
any nail offered you on which the maker 
is ashamed to put his name. "There's 

a nigger in the fence" even although 

he is a "Black Prince." Our name is 
on every box we sell of "Q" brand, and 
it affords a guarantee to the buyer, backed 
up by 37 years' experience in making 
horse nails exclusively, that you are gc't^T; 
to have the best. Good day ! 

Canada Horse 
Nail Company 

MOISTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



51 



THAI OLO RUSTED STOCK 

Why don't you get it together 
and have it made like new ? 

WE REPLATE, REPOLISH 

fe all kinds of Metal Goods in 

Gold, Silver, Copper, Brats 
and Nickel. 

Don't put it off any longer. Get 

the old stock fixed up for your trade. 

WRITE US FOR PRICES. 

MOORE & ORR, E Kr, 

81 Adelaide St. W., - - TORONTO. 

Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 

AND 

. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 




HARNESS PREPARATIONS, 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 

HARNESS DRESSING 



Recognized as 
" THE STANDARD." 

Produces a brilliant jet- 
black gloss which will not 
peel or smut and to which 
dirt will not stick. 




^flNESS SOK ? * 



Frank Miller's 

Harness Soap 

Unrivaled for 
cleaning and soft- 
eniDg Harness. 

Put up in cakes, 
pans, boxes and 
tubs. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil. 



Preserves and softens the leather, 
thus adding life. 

The highest quality of oil on the IP^^^f 
market. 




Papers. 

-Our Kind 
—The Good 
-Kind. 



Every merchant wan's to 
please his customers. You 
will do this if you do up 
your parcels in good 
Wrapping Papers — the 
k'nd that will wear — from 
these mills. 

—None better. 
— See that you 
—have tbem. 



CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



The Oshawa Wire Fence Co. 



OSHAWA, ONT. 

Manufacturers of . . ■ 



Limited 



Woven Wire Fencing, Gates. Etc. 

Also Dealers in Galvanized Fence Wire. 




Ageuts waDted. Send for catalogue and prices 




l^^ENTERPRISE^^g on an art icle is a 
Gua.rss.ntee of QUALITY 



Bone, Shell & 
Corn Mill 




No. 750, $7.50 

Meat Juice 
Extractor 




No. 21, $2.50 



VB~ ENTERPRISE "&§ 

®»-k<mm FOOD 

CHOPPERS 

Four Knivcr 

with ea.cn Machine 

No. 100, chops 2 lbs. per minute \ gl.50 
No. 300, chops j lbs. per minute, $2.25 




Sell every Da.y in Yeaur 
GUARANTEED TO CHOP RAW MEAT 



Illustrated Catalogue FREE 



Ordei through your Jobber 



Cherry Stoners 

5 Sizes if- Styles 




Rapid Grinding & 
Pulverizing Mills 

43 Sizes & Stales for Hum 
& Power, p 25 to 300.00 




No. 2% $4.75 



^0 w«r r e k n streelf' TEe Enterprise Mfg. (g. of Pa., Philadelphia, Pa. San 1( Fr 



105 Front Street 



52 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

GLASS CATALOGUE FOR HARDWAREMEN. 

TH E Hobbs Manufacturing Co. , Limited, 
of London, Ont , have just issued a 
new catalogue of all kinds of glass 
for building purposes, which contains a large 
number of designs of leaded glass, sandcut, 
electro glazed and all other kinds of fancy 
glass. 

This company has recently made con- 
considerable changes with the object of 
increasing its facilities for the manufacture 
of leaded art and other glass, and is able to 
offer exceptionally good value, workman- 
ship and prompt delivery. A large and 
complete stock of all kinds of window and 
fancy glass will be carried. The new cata- 
logue should be in the hands of every 
hardwareman. 

A WELL DESIGNED CIRCULAR. 

The Canada Paint Company have issued 
a midsummer circular ; and, as is usual 
with the advertising this company produces, 
it is bright, tasty, and to the point. A 
thermometer engraved in one corner regis- 
ters 90 degrees, so there is no need of the 
heading, " Midsummer." But the head- 
piece is attractive throughout. It is a 
lithographed view of Old Windmill point, 
near Prescott, Ont., which all Canadians 
know as the place made famous by the 
fight which took place there during the 
troublous times of 1837-38. The signature 
of Mr. Robt. Munro is lithographed at the 
bottom of the circular. The circular thanks 
their clients for their support during the 
first half of the year, and proceeds to give 
reasons why such support should be con- 
tinued and increased during the other half. 
It has all the appearance of a personal 
letter. 

M'CLARY'S CATALOGUE. 

The McClary Manufacturing Company 
have displayed noteworthy marks of genius. 
They have made a stove catalogue attrac- 
tive. Hardware and Metal rarely sees 
more tasteful covers upon any catalogue. 
The arrangement of contents, the character 
of paper used, the distinct, clear outlines 
and bright attractiveness of the cuts in 
every way are creditable to this enterprising 
firm. 

This illustrated descriptive catalogue of 
1902 contains illustrations and detailed 
descriptions of their " Famous " lines. 
Steel ranges and heaters, cast iron cook- 
ing and heating stoves and ranges, gas 
and oil and camp stoves, warm air and 
agricultural furnaces, registers and hollow 
wares comprise the total of this attrac- 
tive and useful volume. 

Other excellent features of the catalogue 
are the directions for operating the 



"Famous" stoves, ranges and furnaces, 
the works and branch warehouse notes, a 
review of trade conditions, and their list of 
telegraphic code words. 

Special attention might be drawn to the 
double.oven ranges. 

In every way this catalogue is a most 
complete production. 

ARTISTIC HARDWARE. 

An exceedingly handsome catalogue is 
the Architects' Edition of Artistic Hardware, 
issued by TheGurney-Tilden, Co., Limited, 
Hamilton, Ont. This edition, the fifth, 
contains a comprehensive grouping of the 
trimmings required for various buildings. A 
complete list of the finishes most suitable 
for the various designs is furnished. The 
catalogue contains many bright, clear cuts 
of locks, latches, pin butts, catches and 
pulls, with quotations. 

The whole edition is handsomely bound 
in a neat cover of blue and white. The 
excellence of the paper is seldom found in 
many of the best magazines. The catalogue 
reflects great credit upon this enterprising 
firm. 

"ECONOMIC" STOCKS AND DIES. 

Decatur, Bull & Co., Montreal, have 
been appointed sole Canadian agents for 
the " Economic" stocks and dies for F. E. 
Wells & Son, Greenfield, Mass. 

In the "Economic " dies you get every- 
thing that is to be had in a solid die except 
unnecessary weight and inferior steel, and 
you get results that cannot, it is claimed, 
be had in any solid die sold at a similar 
price. It is said to be the fastest and 
cleanest-cutting die in the market, and will 



wear longer and oil easier and cut truer. 
It is a perfectly new device made of pressed 
and corrugated steel, so ingenuously con- 
structed that it leaves no room for the rival 
competitor in price, weight, speed, or 
accuracy. Although perfectly new upon 
this market, it has become a popular die in 
England, Germany and the United States? 
They are carried by the leading wholesale 
houses of Canada who will supply catalogue 
on application. 

THE NEW GEM SAFETY RAZOR. 

The many new features and the superior 
merits of the new "Gem" safety razor 
have combined to greatly increase its sales 
in Canada. The trade mark " Well That's 
Fine " is a fair criticism of the satisfaction 
evinced by the many who are now employ- 
ing it. The dealer need have no fear in 
recommending this article to his customers. 
The makers are the ' * Gem ' ' Cutlery 
Company, with works at 34 Reade street, 
N.Y.C. In most of the large cities of 
Canada can be found distributing agents. 
The manufacturers will send them on a 10 
days' trial. 

NATIONAL CUTLERY SHEARS. 

National Cutlery Co.' s shears have proven 
a testimonial for themselves. The rapid 
increase of their sales with some of our 
leading wholesale firms speaks for their 
quality and finish. 

These shears are laid with special steel of 
superior quality, tempered by patented 
method, which process gives uniform 
results. There are no soft spots, no feather 
edges. The only shears made with a steel 
ride, and every shear fully warranted. 
They are put up in separate pockets. 
Decatur, Bull & Co., Montreal, are sole 
Canadian agents. 



Apollo galvanized iron is 
all alike; if not, send back 
to your jobber at our ex- 
pense — we shall hear of it. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

63 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



l| 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




53 



Bell Telephone, 


= 


Main 208 


rierchants' 


P. 0. Box 839. 


311 



ALEX. McARTHUR & GO. 



-MANUFACTURERS 



2 & 3-Ply Ready Roofing, 
Building Papers, 
Sheathing and Carpet Felt, 
Coal Tar Products. 



Hanging and 
Print Paper, 

Brown and Manilla 
Wrapping. 



Paper mils : Joliette. Que. 

Felt Factory : Harbour and Logan Sts., Montreal. 

82 McGill Street, Montreal. 

QUALITY— THE BEST— no better manufactured. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



July 18, 1902 
Thes : prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual ttrms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor m anxious 10 be informed at once of 
any apparent error* in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 
MRT* LS 
TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 aud 23 lb. ingo", 100 lb. $32 00 .$33 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates Bright. 
MLS, equal to Bradley. Per box. 

I C, usual sizes 86 75 

IX. " 825 

I.X.X. " 9 75 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

I.0 6 75 

IX 8 25 

I.X.X 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Grades — 

I. ., usual sizes 5 00 

IX. " 6 00 

I.X.X. " 7 00 

IX XX. " 8 00 

DC, 12%xl7 4 50 

D.X 523 

D.X.X 6 00 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 12x20 4 25 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 75 

20x28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates Terne. 
Dean or J.G. Grade - 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

IX. , Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade- 

X. X ., 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. 1 

" 14x60, " V .... 06% 

" 14x65, " j 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up t ) 2» gauge 8 00 

" " 26 " 8 50 

IRON AND STEEL. 
Common bar, per 100 lb. ... 1 95 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Ho Seshoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoon steel, 1 % to 3 in. base 2 90 

Sleigh shoe stee', " a 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 285 300 

T. Firth & Co. stool eteel.perlb 12% 13 

Jessop's tool steel OH 

Morton's tool steel 12% 13 

Black Diamond and "B.C." 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's to-d steel 08 09 

Park's " silver " tool steel. ... 12 14 
v "special" 0)5 50 

• SJSas ft Coiver's tool steel. 08 15 
„ . ' "air hardening" "0 50 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

,,, „, BOILER TUBES. Per foot. 

1%, 1% and 4 inch 09 

2'/2in 16 

\™: 013 

3% in r> 16 

* n 31 

STUEL, BOILER PLATE. 

'4 in 2 50 2 60 

3-161D...... 2 60 2 70 

% in. and thickc- 2 50 2 60 

BLACK SHEETS. Com. D.FI. 

I'SWige 2 85 3 00 

20 2 85 3 00 

22(o 24 gauge 2 95 3 25 

" 3 05 3 50 

28 " 3 15 

COPPER WARE, 
Discount, 50 per cenr. 



CANADA PLATES. 

AH dul', 52 sheets 3 00 

Half-polished 3 10 

Allb-ight 3 75 

IRON PIPE. 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

% inch 2 90 

% " 2 40 

% " 265 

% " 2 85 

% " 3 65 

1 " 5 20 

1'4 " 1 35 

1% " 8 95 

2 " 12 55 

2% " 2» 00 

3 " 28 00 

3% " 36 00 

4 " 43 00 

4% " 50 00 

5 " 57 00 

6 " 73 00 

Galvanized pipe— 

% inch 3 20 

% " 345 

% " 3 85 

% " 5 00 

1 " 1 20 

1'4 " 10 05 

1% " 12 20 

2 " 16 85 

Discount 4 per cent. 
Malleable Fittings— Discount 35 p.c. 
Cast Iron Fittings — 

On all cast iron fitting, including plugs, 
bushings, unions and nipples, 60 p.c. dis. 
All others— discount ^O p.c. 

GALVANIZED aHEETS. 

Queen's 
G.C. Comet. ' mer. Head. 

In gauge 

18 to 24 gauge... 4 05 3 75 .... 4 05 
26 " .. 4 25 4 00 .... 4 25 

28 " .. 4 50 4 25 «4 40 4 50 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 
*29 gauge. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, 3-16 in. , per 100 lb 

V 4 " ... 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " ... 5 25 5 50 

% " ... 4 50 4 75 

7-16 " ... 4 25 4 50 

% " ... 4 20 4 50 

9-16 ' ... 4 05 4 50 

% "... 4 00 4 50 

% "... 4 00 4 50 

Halter, kennel aid post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 
Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Eoglish B.S., ton lots 14 00 

Lake Superior 

Bar'. 
Cut'eogthi-.round^to'/sin. 23 00 J5 00 
" round and iquare, 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16' 

o/., 1x48 and 14x60 22 00 22 50 

Plain, 14 oz, and light, 60°., 

irregular sizes 22 50 23 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Hanished 32 00 

Braziers' (in i heets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to301b.eacb,perlb 23 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 0-22 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 21 

Boiler and T. K. Pitts. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, lerlb 32 



BRASS. 

Red and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rjlled, 2x4 0.3 

Tubing, base, per lb 23% 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, rer lb 5 50 6 00 

Domestic " 

ZINC SHEET, 

5-cwt. casks 6 00 6 25 

Part c sks 6 25 6 50 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 50 3 75 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 2% lb. sq. ft., by roll 06% 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 05 

None.— Cut sheets %?. per lb. extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 37% p.c. dis. fob. Toronto. 

N T«\ — Cut lengths, netpiice, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.: chilled, $7.00 
per 1 00 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7 50. Dis- 
count, i2% p.c. Prices are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Teinis3 p.c. cash, fieights equalized. 
SOIL PIPE AND FITTING*. 

Discount, 60 p.c. on medium and extra 
heavy, and 55 p.c. on light soil pipe and 
fittings. 

SOLDER. Per lb. Per lb. 

Bar half-nnd-half, guarant'd 20 

Bar, half and-half, commerl 1914 

Refined 19 

Wiping 18% 

AN1IMONY. 

Cookson s.perlb 9 SO 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 5 87% 

No. I 5 50 " 

No. 2 5 12% 

No. 3 4 75 

No. 4 4 37/, 

Munro's Select Flake White 6 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 12% 

Brandram's B.B. Genuine 7 00" 

No. 1 6 00 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $1 75 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, p,r cwt 5 00 

No. 1 , 1 60 lb. casks, per cwt 4 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 4 50 

WHITE ZINC. 

EitraRedSeal 06 08 

No. 1 05% 07 

No. 2 05 06 

DRV WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

bo. I, casks 5 00 

No. 1 , kegs 5 25 

PREPARED PAINTS. 
In l A, %and 1-gall n ti.s. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qua lit its. per gallon 10 

Barn (io bis.) CO 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 140 

Canada Paint Cos pure 1 2i 

Tor nr,o Lead & Color Cos pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcys pure 120 

Stewart & Wood's Champion pure I 10 
COLORS IN OIL. 
?5 lb. tins, standard Quali y. 

Venetian red, p, rib 04% 06 

Chrome yellow 12 14 

Golden ochre 08 10 

French " 06 

Marine black 09 

Chrome green i0 

French imperial green 12 

Sigowriters' black 16 

Burnt umber 11 

" sienna 11 

Raw umber 11 

" sienna 11 



COLORS, DRY. 

Common ochre, bbls 1 20 1 ?, 

Yellow ochre (J.F.L.S.), bbl- . 2 00 

Yellow cchre (La Belle).. . i 15 ] 25 

Brusselaochie ._ _ 2 gj, 

Venetian red (best), bbi. .,." j '75 2 00 
English oxides, per cwt. ... " 300 325 
American txides, ■ bis, . " 1 25 2 00 
Canadian oxides, bbls. '.'.'."' 1 25 17-, 
Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 15 

Burnt sienna, pure, per lb 

" umber, " "....' 1 10 

Raw do , ) \ \ - ' - " „ „„ 

Drop black, pure n no 

Chrome yellow •, pure .'. 18 

Chrome greens, pure per lb. '.' 09 10 

Golden ochre 01 05 

Ultramarine blue, in 18-lb 

botes per lb 06 18 

Fire proof mineral, per 100 li 1 00 

Genuine Eng. Litharge.p rib 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb. ... i'^5 1 5 q 

Pure Indian red, No. 45, lb... 08 10 

Whiting, bbl 55 60 

English vermi lion in 30-lb. tags. 95 

PARIS GREEN. p er lb 

Pe roleuir, c .sks lf!% 1. ig 

Arseuickegs 17 19 

50 lb. *nd 100- b. drums 18^ 19" 

55-lb. drums 19 20 '" 

J; 1 ?- Packages 20 20% 

l^lb b tins, (1 . ...V.V.V. ° ?2 ° 22 * 

%ib. do ..;; 

F.O. B. Toronto. Terms - 3 p.c. off 30days 
or 4 mos. from date of deliveiv 

BLUESTONE 

Casks, for spraying, per lb fl 07 

100-lb. lots/do per lo ... . „ 'i 

PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 an 

Bulk in 1 ss quan' ity " ' ■> n\ 

Blailitrs in btls. % £ 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or 'loose '.'.'.". 2 40 

Bladdeisio25-lb. tins. .1 ii 

Bl,ddersinl2%lb. lins.. .'.'.'. !'.".'." " % g5 
Bladd rs in bu k or tins less than ioOlb 2 90 

VARNISHED 

r, • »r \" 5 " 8al - lo,s - p er gal. Net 

Crriage, No. 1 150 , cS 

V ale durable body 4 10 4 25 

„ .. '.' . ruling 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 2 85 3 00 

No 1 brown japan ." 85 90 

Elastic oak , -n 

Furniture, extra .,' , ,= 

No. 1 ;;:; \ j 

H- a r d f ".'J. « D 'Sh 1 65 175 

Light oil finish 140 1 an 

D * m . ar ,-.; •":: 1 70 1 85 

Shellac, white 2 35 2 45 

m " ° ra ?e e ••. ■ 2 25 2 35 

lurpentuie, brown japan 1 25 1 «o 

" black japan 85 1 JO 

No. 1.. 50 75 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, eaeb, 2 00 

Granitme floor finish, per gal ' 2 75 

Maple Le*f coach enamels : Size 1 ,«1 20- 
si e 2, 70c: sue 3, 40c. each 
Sherwin-Wiiliams' copal varnish, assorted 
cise, from %-pts. to 1 gal. $ '.50. 

CASTOR OIL. 

East India, in cases, per lb. . . 00% 10 

' " small lots 10" 10. 

COD OIL, ETC. 

Cod oil, per gal 50 55 

Pure olive j i0 

" leatsfoot .' ' 90 

GLUE 

Common 08 09 

frenchmedal oil li 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

«hite, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 25 30 

£, tr 'P 18 iO 

£°°P"S 19 20 

Huttner 15 16 



54 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



JAflES HUTTON & CO. 



Sole Agents in Canada for 

Joseph Rodgers & Sons, Limited, 
Steel, Peech & Tozer, Limited, 
W. & S. Butcher, 



Thomas Goldsworthy & Sons, 
Burroughes & Watts, Limited, 
Etc., Etc., 



Have reopened their offices in Victoria Chambers, 



232 McGill Street, 



MONTREAL. 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 
Cartridges. 

B. B Caps Dom. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis 40 p. o., Amer 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 5 ( and 5 p. o 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle 10 P.O. A.oer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.o. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. ; American, $1.6). 
Wads per lb 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags ••■•.• 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 19 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges I 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10 3 4 

Hav Budden, 80-lb. and over .... 09% 

Brook's, .... Oil'! 

Angers . 

Gilmour's discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Huntcs' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality. ...... ••...;•••.. 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tabs. 

Zm o 600 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 
5%-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

Antl-Frictlon Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

" B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 41 

^T.;:::::::""^"'./::::::::: 1% 

Aluminum, 99 p.o. pure "Syracuse".. 45 

Bells. 

Hand 
Brass, 60 per oent. 
Nickel, 55 per oent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro',disoount 45 per cent 
Farm. 

American , each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard. 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jeuuings' Gen. net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike , per gross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 .0 12 

Bolts and Nnts. Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, common (.$1 list) ... 55 
" " full square ($).40 list) 55 

" " Norway iron ($3 list).. 50 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 50 and 5 

Plough Bolts 50 and 5 

Blank Bolts 50and5 

Bolt Ends 50and5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65 and 5 

Coach Screws, cone point £6% 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3%c per lb off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 3 3 4c. per lb. off. 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c . 

Nuts, in 50 lb. lots '4c. per lb extra, in less 
than 59 lb. lots, %c extra. 

Boot Calks. 
Small and medium, ball, per M — 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 6 i% per cent 

Broilers . 

Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% percent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent 

Henis,No.8. " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 11 00 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Butcher Knives. 

Bailey's, per doz 60 6 30 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 1b 1 70 

Ready rooting, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per rol 85 

Ready rooting, 3-ply, not under 65 lb. 

perroll 1 10 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 00 

Dry sheathing, per roll, 400 sq ft 35 

Tar sheathing, " "' " 45 

Dry fibre " " " 5j 

Tarred fibre, " " " 60 

O.K.tl.Xl, 65 

Resin-Bized. " " " 40 

Oiled sheathing, " 600 " 110 

" 400 " 70 

R of coa'ing. in birrels, pergal 17 

■' " small packages 25 

Refined tar, per barrel 4 50 

Coal tar, " 4 00 

Coal tar, less than barrels, per gal... 15 

Roofing pith, per K0 lb 85 

Ball Rings. 

Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 



Butts. 

Wrought Brass net revised list. 

■ Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, die., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Loose Fin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

American, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 8 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 !5 3 00 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

f'unartian hydraulic 125 ' sn 

Arrow 2 25 

Buffalo 2 00 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels . 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. ft W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames — 20o. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 56 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 54 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. *9 63 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Teu. SyphonWashout 6 00 
Emb. Elgin orTeu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonio, plain 9 60 
" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Out. Sy. Jet, plain 1170 

emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

BasinsP.O., 14 in 70 

" oval 17x14 in 150 

" 19x15 in .. 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Conductor Pipe. 
Plain or Corrugated. 

2-iDch, per 100 feet 3 00 

3 4 00 

4 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 900 

Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. 4 D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

6, " 15 

Boynto pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, die., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard die. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 



EAVE TROUGH. 

10-inch, per 100 ft S3 10 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) per doz. 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 20 

7-inoh 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 " 

Kearney* Foot 70 " 10 " 

Disston's 70 " 10 " 

American 70 " U " 

J. Barton Smith 7' " 10 " 

McOlellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 " 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 61. 10 and 5 " 

Royal 80 " 

Globe 70 to 75 " 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per oen' . 
Nicholson File Co 's "Simplicity" file handle, 
per gross 85c. to $1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under26 2 20 4 25 .... 6 25 

26to40 2 40 4 65 .... 8 75 

41to50 5 10 .... 7 50 

5lto60 5 35 .... 8 50 

61 to 70 5 75 .... 9 75 

71 to80 6 25 .... 11 00 

81 to 85 7 00 .... 12 55 

86to90 7 75 .. 15 00 

91to95 17 50 

96 to 100 2u 50 

GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's Nos. 26 to 33, each... 1 65 2 40 

HALTERS. 
Rope, % per gross 



;to% 



9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web, —per doz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent Can. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic per doz 110 

Sledge. 

Canadian per b 07% 08* 

Ball Fean. 
English and Can., per lb — 22 
HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 

Store door, per doz 1 00 

Fork. 
CAB., dis. 40 per cent, rev list. 

Hoe. 
C. ft B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. ist. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 1 00 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Cross-Out Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13^4 

HANGERS. doz. pair,, 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 Ou 

Stearns, 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-ft.run 

No. 11%,10-ft.run 

No. 12, 10-f t.run 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS 
Canadian, dis 40 to 42% per cer. t. 



dis. 



1 20 



25 



3 00 
1 50 



1 J»> 

3 75 



8 40 
10 80 
12 60 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



55 



Wire-Edged Ready Roofing 

The above Roofing is fast becoming the popular substitute for Shingles, because it is Durable, 
Ifcconomical and Fire-proof. We wish to supply customers through the Retail Hardware 
Merchants, and, with that object in view, we are spending thousands of dollars in advertising our goods. 
It will be your fault, not ours, if we are forced to sell direct to the user. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montreal. 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-iu., per lb. . . . 06% 
5-in., " .... 06% 
" 6-in., " .... 06 
" 8-in., " .... 05% 
" 10-in., " .... u 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 60 p.o. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount, 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 100 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can. dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, disoount 45 per oent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 
HORSE NAILS. 
"O'brand 50 and 7%D.o.off new li tl Oval- 
"M ' brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J head 
Countersunk. 60 per oent. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium and heavy. . 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899. 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 0) 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.o. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb I 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.o. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P.,per 

doz .... 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 9i 1 0) 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 6) per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

,;old Blast, per doz... 7 00 

No. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No.0 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 1 87 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 120 130 

LINES. 

Fishpergross 105 2 50 

Chalk 7l 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS 
Canadian, dis 40 p.c. 
Russel fcErwin per doz.... 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle dis. 30 p.c. 



Padlocks 
English and Am. per doz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head discount 20 p.o. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz 125 I 50 

Carpenters', hickory, per do?. 125 3 75 

Lignum Yitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulkingeach 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.o. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are ; Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 45 $3 55 

3d 3 10 3 22 

4and5d 2 85 3 05 

6and7d 2 75 2 10 

8and9d 2 60 2 70 

10andl2d 2 55 2 65 

10 and 20d 2 50 2 60 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 45 2 55 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.50 
Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 75 p.o. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 per cent. 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round, and octagon 

per groBS 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh,19w.g., uis. 51 and 5 to 5C and 10 p.c. 
2-in. Mesh, 18 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.o. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

U.S. Navy 7 25 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oi 
car, with pump, 5 gal. 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wash tubs discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, di?. 40 p.c. 
6, lu and 14-qt. flaring pails, diB. 40 p.o. 
Creamer cans, dis. 4Up.c. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per gross... 1 75 3 00 
Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PINE TAR. 

% pint in tins, per gross 7 80 

1 " " " ... 9 60 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 40 per ceil. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian < r American 7% 
to 40 per oent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button'* Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Standard Compression work, diB. 60 p.o. 
"J.M.T." Cushion work. dis. 60 p.c. 
Fuller work, dis. 65 p.o. 
6 doz. lots and ver of the above extra dis. 
10 pc. 



Lever Handle Stops and Waste, discount 

60 pc. With, in lots of 2 doz. and over, 

an extra dis. of 10 p.c. 
"J.M.T." Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 55 p.c. 
Standard Glooe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 6i p.c. 
" J.M T." Radiator Valves, dis. 55 p c. 
Standard " " dis., 65 p.c. 

Patent Quick Opening Valves, dip. 70 p.c. 
No. 1 compression bath cock, net . . 2 00 

No. 4 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 90 

Nn. 4%, " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, per doz 15 00 

Patent Compretsion Cushion, bath 

cock No. 2208 2 25 

Square head bross cocks, fO p.c. 

" " iron " 60 p.c. 
Compel ition Globe, Angle and Check Valves 

discount, 70 p. c. 
Competition Quick Opening Radiator Valves, 

discount, 70 p.c. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 2i% per ce^t. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Scrsw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductor's ' 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid per set 00 72 

" hollow ptr inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS. Net. 

Dominion, 30 gal 5 75 

Dominion, 35 " 6 75 

40 " 7 75 

Ronald's Galvanized, 30 gallons 6 50 

35 " .... 7 50 

40 " .... 8 50 

Copper, 30 gallons 10 00 

" 35 " 23 20 

" 40 " 26 40 

RAKES. 

Wood, per doz.net 110 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 0G 

Ueo. Butltr JUJo.'s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

KingCutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 0" 12 00 

Bailey's 6 00 12 00 

Carbo Magnetic Razor 1 5 00 

Griffon Barbers' Favorite 10 75 

Griffon No. 65 13 

Griffon Safety Razor.) 1 50 

" Stropping Machines 13 50 

All other razurs 50 p.c. off catalogue price. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AND BURKS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and lu per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartonp, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper RivetBwithniual proportion burrs, 45 

p. c. dis. cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, 30 and p.c. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivetr, 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPF, ETC. 

Sisal 12% 

Pure Manilla )5 

"British" Manilla 13 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

%inch 22 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute S 

Lath Yarn 11 



Sisal bed cord, 48 ft per doz. 65 

60 f " 80 

72 ft " 95 

KULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 55 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, diB. 37% Co 40 p.p. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 70 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B & A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Rmery, 40 per cent. 
GarLet(Rurton'B), 5 to 10 p.c. advance od list 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. 9 50 

SAWS. 
Sand Disston's, diB. 12% p.c. 
S. & D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, DisBton'f, per ft.. 35 56 
S. & D. , dis. 35 p.o. on Nob. 2 and 3 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

" frame only 75 

SASH WE1UHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, " 1 75 2 00 

SASH CORD. 
Peril 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln an i Wh t'ng, per doz 4 75 

Hand Sets, No. 1 Woodjait (Moirill) 4 25 
X-cut S t»,No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

Sf'ALEH 
Burrow, Stewart & Mi ne— 

Imperial standard, 40 p< rent. 
Wtigh Beams, 35 per c nt. 
Cbanipkn Scales, 55 per cen 
Fairbanks Staudard, 35 p.v.. 
Dominion, 55 p.c. 
" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Warren's n<w Standard 40 p c. 
Champion 55 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS 

Sargent's per doz 65 1 00 

SCREW, 1 -. 
Wood, F.B., Drieht and steel, 87% and lJ| . . 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and lu p.c. 

" F. H., brass diB. 80 and 10 p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.u. 
F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.u. 
" B.H. " 70 p.-. 

Drive Screws, 87% and 10 per cent. 

Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 i 00 

iron. " 4 2'. 5 00 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cen . 

SCYTHES. 
Perdo?.,net 5 00 8 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SUGARS. 
Bailey Cu.lery Co. , full nickeled, dis. 60 atd 

2% p.c. 
Bailey Cutlery Japan handles, 67% p.c. 
Seymour'?, dis. 50 and 10 p.t. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dip. 40 and 5 per ceni. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discoui t 45 per cent 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 26 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1160 

SOLDKKINU IRONS. 

1, l%lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 56 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis 60 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plair, die., 75 and 12V 2 p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dip., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 2i 3 5' 

Plain 2 90 3 15 

Coopers', discount 45 percent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 



56 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



—TO IMPORT. 



Prompt Deliveries 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BEST GLASS of all kinds, our own manufacture. Closest 



'rices. 



TORONTO PL/VTE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



Warerooms and Offices— 135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



STOCKS AND DIES. 

American dia. 25 p.O. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

" Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Srind,2in,40 to 200 lb, per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

5and6iuch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4— 3 dozen in case.net cash .... #4 80 
No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 & 12Vi 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... .85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 15 

T ' " tinned 80 & 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only . .80 

" Vt weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80410 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12% k 12% 

" brush, blued & tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 4 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet lacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 54% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and lu 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 



Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Pine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

" " " bulk 40 

Shoe nails 60 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz.... 2 75 5 00 
English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Bailey's, dis. 25 p.c. 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H.tN„ P. S. 4 W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 
Disston s discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. 4 D , discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 19 

" " 4-ply 23 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, • " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brook's 12 3 4 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 350 

No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge $2 60 



10 
SI 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



6c. extra. 
12c. 



20c. 

30a. 

. 40c. 

. 55c. 

. 70c. 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning 
Extras net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c 
spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c 
best steel wire 75c, bright ah drawn 15c 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, paoked in 
casks or cases 15c, bagging and papering 
10c, 50 and 100 lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. 
bundles 15c, in 5 and 10-Ib. bundles 25c. in 
1-lb. hanks 50c, in %-lb. hanks 75c, in %-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 22% per cent 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5— No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65-No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26 
$9.50— No. 27, $10— No. 28, $11 No. 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13-No.31,$14-No. 32 $15, 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nob. 26-31 
$4— Nob. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil, 
ing, 10c. — in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-Ib. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, lOo 



TORONTO 



Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and lOperoent. net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Galvanized Wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 6,7.8, $3.50 
to $3.85— No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10, 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10- No. 
12, $3 to $3.30— No. 13, $3.10 to $3.40— 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50— No. 15, $4.60 to 
$5.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5.35. Base sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52% f.o.b. Cleveland. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18, *2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hol- 
low 6 strand, No. 17, $4.30; No. 18. $2 70, 
No. 19, $2.35; No 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamil 
ton, Toronto Montreal 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

Salvanized, plain twist 3 00 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77% 

in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 

WIRE CLOTH 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. 1 37% 

Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 6 

White 8 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.o 

Towers' Engineer, each 3 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G ft K.'s Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket , per doz 35 3 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " .... 24 00 

Royal American., " .... 24 00 

Sampson " 24 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c 30 days 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 




ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 

"Pullman" 

Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No. 11. 

Pullman Sash Bal. Co. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 






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I STEVENS-M AYNARD JR RIFLE \ 

J 

Jr. It ♦ 



i- 



The 

Young Gentleman's 

Rifle. 




The 

Young Gentleman'! 
Rifle. 



you want the best cheap rifle ever made we have it in the Stevens-Maynard 
will be a great seller this year. Better place order now. 



The leading Jobbers handle Stevens products. 



t J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2I *°* Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. | 

A A A A AAAA A A A A aaaaaaaaaaaaaxAa^aXAAaaaaAAAAaX*A1AaAA4AAA^aXA 
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6ELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, ete. 




■CKNOWLEDSED THI BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

Hot connected with Any Shear Combination. 



NEW YORK OFFICE. 9* CfaaafcereM. 
NBWARK, N.J.. U.S.A. 



ONTARIO 

NUT WORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Hut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
'r 13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto berepresentedin Canada. 

"THEEMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 



Cables- 
Machinery," Newport. 



Emlyn Engineering Works, 
Newport, Mon., England. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

u , , , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 




WRIGHT'S 

Insect 
Sprayers 

PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 

"BEST ON EARTH." 



Manufactured by 

E.T. WRIGHT & CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT., and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

J. H. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



WHERE 



OUR LARCE NEW FACTORY Shears, Scissors, 

Razors, Butcher 
Knives and other 
Cutlery are made 



Dy 




BAILEY CUTLERY 
CO,, Limited 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 

Write for catalogue and prices. 



CHAS. P. CLARK, President. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849. 



JARBD CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 846 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and the 
controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information, no effort is spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify Its claim as an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
furnishes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service famished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Hpeclnc 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. ' 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING; Gen. Man, Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON, Gen. Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1 825. 



.MONTREAL. 

75 YEARS- 



u 



Syracuse Babbitt: Metal 



' IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular end Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.Y. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Gold Street, New York. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



\ 



!! 

Il 



il 



•t.18 




Inc. 1895 



Black Diamond FileWorks 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ^^^j***, Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




< %^%^%%%^%%^%^%%^%^ 



I 



PATENT INTERLOCKING 

RUBBER TILING. 

The most perfect floor covering for Hotels, 
Cafes, Business Offices, Banks, Court Rooms, 
Churches, Hospitals, Vestibules, Halls, Billi 1 
and Smoking Rooms, Lavatories and Bath Rooius. 

NOISELESS NON -SLIPPERY 

WATERPOOF SANITARY 

Carefully selected range of soft, beautiful 
colors affording ample scope for combinations in 
harmony with surroundings. 

Write for Prices and Particulars. 



Sole] Canadian Manufacturers 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OP TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms— 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



Factorles-I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 



CANADA. 



CASTOR OIL 



BRITISH MANUFACTURED. 



We have a full stock of 



Pharmaceutical 
First Pressure 
Second Pressure 



In Barrels and Cases. 



Prices from stock and to import on application. 



B. & S. H. THOMPSON & CO 



53 St. Sulpice Street, 

MONTREAL 



LIMITED 



VARNISHES and JAPANS 

McCASKILL, DOUGALL & CO. 



Manufacturers 



MONTREAL 




Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Wont turn white from the effects of water and sun. 

Standard Piano, Fnrnitnre and Decorative Varnishes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and YanLnes 
Architectural Varnishes 



OFFICES : 

161 Summer St., 30 St. John St., 

BOSTON, Mass., U.S.A. MONTREAL. 



The Best Valua for all aachlnery 

Bearings, 

LANGWELL'S BABBIT 

MONTREAL. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 26, 1902 



NO. 30. 



<$s»r bo**; 

Tp>*^ MANUFACTURER ^Cj 

ARROW#BRAND 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

i HARDWARE j 

e -1s SPECIALITIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



FLEUR JLDE LIS. 
M 



The Second Best 
Galvanized Iron 



'Queen's Head". Quality. Ordinary Galvanizing. 




JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENO. Managers Canadian Branch. 







rill ill 


| jl 


' II 1 ! It 
I 1 i 1 I 






llili 

I 111 II 


I Ii 


ii J 










11 

1 




1 I 1 
til 

II 1 Ii i 


1 III III 

ill! li' ! 








ill : | 




ii ! iHl 


1 H 








iljr i 


1 








ItwL i 








wv 





it 



Safford" Radiators 



Manufactured for Heating all 
classes of Buildings by Hot 
Water or Steam. Made in 
different heights, beautiful de- 
signs. Plain or Ornamental. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 



Head Office and Works: DUFFERIN ST. 



TORONTO, CAN. 



LAWN 



VASES 

SEATS 

MOWERS 

ROLLERS 

HOSE 

SPRINKLERS 

AT 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Write for Catalogue and Prices. ^^TORON 



Canada Plates. 

Ordinary All Bright 

18x21 x 60 Sheets 18x21 x 60 Sheets 

1 8 x 24 x 52 " 1 8 x 24 x 52 

1 8 x 24 x 60 

18x24x75 

20 x 28 x 40 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

27 Wellington St. West, ^TORONTO, ONT. 

English House : SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 164 Fenchurch St., LONDON, E.C. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every desoiption of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



GARDEN HOSE 

Seamless Tube 



SEAMLESS TUBE 



LAPPED TUBE 




All brands of our GARDEN HOSE are 

made with our 

Patent Seamless Tube 



WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Lightning, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 






ARE 



Well Advertised. 
In Demand. 
Easily Sold. 
Satisfactory in Use. 
Of Known Reputation. 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops. 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers. 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free. 



EXCEL IN 



Easy Running. 
Quick Freezing, 
Economy. 
Convenience. 
Practical Results. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., PhHade u'I h A ia ' Pa - 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




No. 101 



WEDGE POINT 

Dealer's Card on Head in Gross Lots. 



No. 112 






No. 110 



lr^ 



WEDGE POINT SPRING PICK. 

No. 113 Dealer's Card on Head in Gross Lot?. 




WEDGE POINT 



No. Ill 



^ ^ 



WEDGE POINT SPRING PICK 
Splits Ice like an Axe. 

ANTI-RUST N1CKEL=PLATED 




NEEDLE POINT. 
WALKER'S QUICK AND EASY ICE PICKS. 

ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



Steel Tempered; will not Bend, 
Break or Rust. 



FREE INSURANCE AGAINST FIRE 




th 'BELST 



AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY TOWN. 



Plaster 



Fire Proof 
Frost 
5ound " 
Will not ca^ck. 



Will Hold Up a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracketis for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light- 
The saying in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 

BSg- Order director through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 

The Best Ready Roofing on Farth. 




TRINIDAD ASPHALT MFG. GO. 

Asphalt and Asbestine Gravelled 
READY D 00F1N6 

WITH INTERLOCKING LAP. 

Fire, water, acid or gas proof. 
Shipped with cement and nails for laying. 

ASPHALT PAINT, CEMENT, COATING, ROOF- 
ING, DEADENING and SLATERs' FH'LT. BUILD- 
ING and INSULATING PAPEK nf all kinds. The 
trade supplied. Prices and samples from the 

Canada Supply Co., Agents, Windsor, On!, 



STOVE BRICK 

FIRECLAY AND ASBESTOS 
FURNACE CEMET 

all kinds of Fiie Clay Products made to order from 
patterns. Write us for varieties and prices. 

JONES BROS., Bracondale, P.O., Ont 

(near Toronto.) 

WILLIAM ABBOTT, Agent, 

Representing Manufacturers, 

Steel Beams, Channels Angles, etc. 
Bar Iron and Steel, Plates, Tubes, etc. 
Brass and Copper Rods, Sheets, Pipes. 

CAST STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES. 
13 St. John Street, ■ MONTREAL. 



BISHOP & CO. 



Established 
1850. 



37 and 28 Little Trinity Lane, 



LONDON, ENG. 



54 Scotland St., SHEFFIELD 

Table Cutlery, all qualities. 



23 Vittoria St, BIRMINGHAM 

Wrought Steel Pots, round or oval. 



Samples on view at the following Agencies: — 

Alex. Thurber, 446 St. Paul St., 

E. Fielding, 34 Yonge St., 

E. L. Denoncourt, 74 St. Joseph St., 



Tinned inside or ename'led. 

MONTREAL. 

TORONTO. 

QUEBEC. 



WIRE ROPE 



Wire Rope. 



OF. 




All Kinds and Sizes 



AND FOR 



PRICES RIGHT. 



All Purposes. 

PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 



The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 



Hamilton, Ont. 



Montreal, Que. 



Black Beauty 
Leather Dressing. 

An absolute black, free from acid. Will not rot stitches, 
but preserves the leather. Renews color and life of a 
harness, no matter how old, red and stiff. Weather and 

water proof. 

Ask your dealer for it. If he has none in stock ask us 
for sample ana price. 

We are sole agents for Canada. 



The Zanzibar Paint Co. t Limited, 



Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SS!!f1!ffWf!f!WtfffWW?!!fl!f1ff1!f1!f1!f^" 



| IT'S SPELT 

e' 

e 



=3 



'G -E-M." 



IT'S PRONOUNCED 



'THE BEST. 



Fruit and Lard Presses. 
3 Juice Extractors. 



| IT'S WRITTEN 



f IT'S DEFINED 



ON MORE ORDERS THAN ANY 
OTHER MAKE. 



AS THE SIMPLEST, YET THE MOST 
PRACTICAL EOOD CHOPPER ON 
THE MARKET. 



3 
3 

3 



Aug iu jy<M 





E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 

E 
E 



ENTERPRISE 

No. 24 — 4 quart. 
No. 35 — 8 quart. 



No. 



20 



Heavily Tinned Self-Sharpening Cutters. 3 

3 



Weight, lbs., P., 5 7 : ., 

Four Steel Cutters of different size 
holes with each machine. 




j^ The GEM is well advertised in all the ^3 

^^ leading periodicals. You will have calls for 



ENTERPRISE 

No. 34 — Capacity, i quirt. 



the GEM. Send your orders direct to 



g 3 ENTERPRISE 

g LEWIS BROS. & CO. 3 



ORDERS FOR THESE GOODS WILL 
BE PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY 
EXECUTED AND BILLED AT 
PRICES THAT WILL MEET WITH 
YOUR FAVOR. 




SENSIBLE 

No. I — 2 quart. No. 2 — 4 quart. 
Has the split nut cross beam, allowing the 
instant removal of pressure plate without 
turning the screw. 






MONTREAL 



3 Meat and Food Choppers. 



tfJUUUUJUJUlUJUJUUiJUiUlUtUUif?. 



Carried in all sizes and capacities. 
Prices on application. 




% 



Wholesale 
Hardware 



Lewis Bros. 1 Co, 



Kitchen 
Supplies 



MONTREAL. 
Toronto : 87 York Street. Ottawa : 54 Queen Street. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 




HRS&C° 

PATENT LEAD HEAD NAILS. 
COIL and CABLE CHAINS. 
SHOVELS ^d MINING STEEL. 
BAR ^ HOOP IRON ^ STEEL. 

Canadian Office : 

6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TINWARE AND TIN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
Jacketed Oil Cans, 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Pails, Etc. 

JAS. A. McGOLPIN 

156=162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



THE 



DANDY SHINER 

(nickel plated) 
A HOUSEHOLD NECESSITY 





MS-Hil 




A 




Y •■■■_ 


j£lj 




^n 


ffT 




1 






^<t£r j. 



Holds shoe rigid. Fits any shoe. 3 lasts (men's, 
women's, child's) go with each shiner. 

Write for wholesale price to 

L. H. Packard & Co., Montreal. 



WATERBURY 
Et » d BRASS CO. 

Main Office and Mills at Waterbury, Conn. 

New York Store, No. 122 to No. 130 Centre St. 

Providence Store, No. 131 Dorrance St. and 

No. 152 Eddy St. 

Pope's Island "White"' 

and 

"Gold Non-Corrosive Metal" 



Suitable for Spinning, Drawing, Stamp- 
ing and Jewelers' Work. 

Brass, German Silver, Bronze and 
Copper in Sheets, Wire Rods, Brazed 
and Seamless Tubing. Metallic Eyelets, 
Shells, Ferrules and small brass wares 
of every description. 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited, 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan - American Exposition. 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 
SISAL PHPF Lath Yarn, Shingle Yarn, Hide RIMnPP TUflMC 

MflN1L KUKL, Cordi pu|( ; Cord f clothes ' Lines BIWUtK TWIWE 

Transmission Rope a Specialty. 





DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 



"Maxwell Favorite Churn " Lawn Mowers. safSii 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improv- 
ed for season of 1902. Steel or Wood Frame 
as desired. 



Low Wheels, 
to 20-in, 
widths. Cold Rolled 
Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate. 



Wheelbarrows, i- 



Four different Sizes. 



Steel Frame Churn 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 



"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



KNOX HENRY 



Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32 Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application.,, 

HORSE NAILS-" C " Brand Horse- Nails 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

" BRASSITE " GOODS — Gunn Castor Co. 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 

Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Glotbes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 







Jjuii.0 fO-PAY 4n€ti, 
U/|f*H A flft/*J ANP 

arnpLG- 0a5£.'* 

DO YOtf? 

ihdvetlisemeet t 
•*• in the 4» 

«//// bring you, 
fenders/ram tfit 
fast contractors 



More Bennett's Patent 
Shelf Boxes. 




The best testimonals are 
second orders. 

"Chicoutimi, P.Q., May 24th, 1902— Please send us 
212 more shelf boxes like the last.— Cote, Boivin 
&Co." 

Write for prices to J. S. BENNETT, TORONTO 




"DAISY" CHURN oe 

Has tempered steel cased bicycle ball bearings, strongest, neat- 
est and most convenient frame. Only two bolts to adjust in 
setting up. Steel Bow Levers, suitable for either a standing or 
sitting posture. Has four wheels and adjustable feet to hold 
stand steady while churning. When churn is locked to stand 
the bow can be used as handles to move it about on the front 
wheels as handy as a baby carriage. Open on both sides to 
centre, giving free space for pail. Made with wood or steel 
stands, with Cranks only, or Bow Levers as desired. 



Vollmar 
Perfect 
Washer 



Has a most enviable record. A 
perfection of its kind— will wash 
more clothes in less time, do it better 
and easier, with less wear and tear, 
than any other machine. 



The Wortman & Ward Mfg. Co., 



LONDON, ONT. 

Eastern Branch, 6o McGill Street, Montreal, Que. 



Limited 



Luxfer Prisms! 



1 he best investment for 

Improving Business 

Premises. 



•wwwwwwwwwwvwvw 



Why 



do up-to-date busi- 
ness men install Luxfer 
Prisms in their store 
fronts or any place they 
are short of light ? 

i 

/WWWWWWWWWWWWW 



WRITE US. 




Interior Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. 
Prisms in Front Windows. 



<vwwwvwwvwwwwwvw 

Because 

to get the best re- 
sults they must have the 
best goods. Thus ob- 
taining good clear white 

light which makes it 

easy to show and sell 
goods. 

Q 

wvwvwwJvvwvwvwwvwi 



Luxfer Prism Co., Limited ^ 



&$ 



100 King Street West, 



TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Best Selling 
Range Ever Made. 

Popular with dealers in every part of the country be- 
cause it is so enthusiastically praised by every buyer. 

Our Imperial Oxford 



has won its laurels — it is the favorite range of Canada 
— widely advertised and everywhere appreciated for 
its practical superiority. 

Are you familiar with its 
Diffusive Flue Construction 
Front Draw=Out Grate 
Draw=Out Oven Rack 

and other talking points 



•> 



If there's any range business in your locality you'll 
get it by handling the Imperial Oxford. Fullest details 
if you write 



THE GURNEY F 



CO., Limited 



TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 




THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 




«£ Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, • 



Fink's Buildings. 
Post Office Chambers 

Park Row Building. 



- AZ Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 



5^ (Krd (Ml fv^: 



^» L/M/rco. 

WE LEAD 

IN THE HANUFACTURE OF : 

Cold Pressed Nuts, 
Square and Hexagon, 

Finished and Semi-Finished, 
Cap Screws, 
Set Screws, i» 

Thumb Screws, Bolts, 
Special Milled Work, etc. 

Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 

14-16 King St. East, TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FIRE 



Partially destroyed our Montreal factory, which was a 
severe handicap, 



BUT 



We now have a stock up from our Halifax factory and are 
able to fill our customers' orders as promptly as ever. 

Anchor Liquid Paint; 

No other can equal it. 

Can be shipped promptly. 

How is your stock ? 

Order at once. 

Ready to hear from you at any time. 



BRANDRAMS' 
B.B. GENUINE 
WHITE LEAD 



COACH COLORS 
VARNISHES 
COLORS IN OIL.Etc. 



OIL STAINS 
VARNISH STAINS 
ENAMELS 



HENDERSON & POTTS 



Mont 



and 



Mali-fax:. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 





LOCkS and 

Builders' Hardware. 

We have a most complete line of all these goods, including the 
very newest ideas in 

Bronze arid Brass Knobs, 

Door Sets and Escutcheons. 



LOCKS AND LATCHES OF ALL KINDS. 

Any dealer asking for a catalogue will be sent full prices, discount sheets, etc., etc. Drop a card. 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 



INCORPORATED 1893. 



The Gurney-Tilden Co M L 

Hamilton. Toronto. Montreal. 



IMITED 



AGENCIES:— ST. JOHN, N. ... VANCOUVER, B.C. 



FOR PRESERVING TIME 



Kemp's 
Enameled 
Preserving 
Kettles 




10 SIZES, 3 TO 30 QUARTS. 
Hanufactured in three popular grades 

DIAMOND 

PEARL 

GRANITE 

How is your stock ? You should not be short at this time of 
the year. We are prepared to supply your requirements 
promptly on receipt of order. 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO. 

TORONTO, CAN. 



INDELIBLO 




COLD WATER PAINT 

You buy it in a dry powder, there is no mess about it and 
no smell. It is milled as fine as flour. It is easily 
mixed with cold water. The color costs a little, water 
is free. You can get it in any quantity you want. It is 
the only genuine satisfactory cold water paint yet dis- 
covered. It is sold all over the world. Made in different 
colors, besides white. Ask for color cards, prices and 
information. 

Agents : 



A. RAMSAY & SON, 
J. ri. ASI1DOWN, 

Mclennan, mcfeely e> co., 



MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 

VANCOUVER 




VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 26, 1902. 



NO. 30. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

,hc MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal 



232 McGill Street. 
Telephone 1255. 
10 Front Street East. 
Telephones 2701 and 2702. 
ioq Fleet Street, E.C. 
W. H, Miln. 
- 18 St. Ann Street. 
H. S. Ashbumer. 
- Western Canada Block. 
J. J. Roberts. 
- Flack Block. 
J. A. Macdonald. 
No. 3 Market Wharf. 
J. Hunter White. 
NEW York • Room 443 New York Life Bldg. 



Toronto 
London, Eng. 
Manchester, Eng. 
Winnipeg 
Vancouver, B.C. 
St. John, N.B. - 



Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address {f d ^Pt. London. 



•WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



MORE BUSINESS MEN WANTED. 

THERE is one feature in connection 
with the retirement of Lord Salisbury 
from the British Cabinet that has not 
/W attracted much attention, and that is in 
regard to the business element in the 
Government. 

As our readers are well aware, there are 
very few business men in the British 
Cabinet, and this fact has been the subject 
of some criticism by the British trade 
press. 
According to a cable despatch received 



this week, it is evident an effort is to be 
made to create a stronger representation of 
business men in the Cabinet, which will 
necessarily have to be reorganized on 
account of the retirement of Lord Salisbury. 
No less an authority than The London 
Times says that there is a strong feeling 
developing that now an excellent oppor- 
tunity is afforded for securing reform in 
tbis direction. It is significant that the 
men in the present British Cabinet who 
have been most successful are Chamberlain, 
Ritchie and Arnold-Foster, almost the only 
commercially-trained men in the Govern- 
ment. 

This agitation for a stronger representa- 
tion of business men in governments is 
gradually increasing. Strong as may be 
the feeling in certain quarters in Great 
Britain that a change is necessary there, it 
is a great deal more so in Australia, where 
all the members of the Cabinet of the 
Commonwealth are lawyers. Our trade 
paper exchanges from there are very out- 
spoken in regard to this deficiency of 
business men in the Government of that 
country. The new tariff has been before 
the Australian Parliament for about nine 
months, and it has only so far passed 
through the Lower House, being still in the 
Senate. This long delay in dealing with 
the tariff is doing a great deal of harm to 
the trade and commerce of the country, 
and the business men are not only dissatis- 
fied with the delay, but they are awakening 
to the absence of the business element in 
the Cabinet. 

This is, if it is anything, a commercial 
age, and it naturally follows that there 
should be in our parliaments a strong 



representation of practical business men, if 
we are to have businesslike legislation. 

Great Britain, essentially a commercial 
nation, is the Mother of Parliaments ; it 
would be a consummation much to be 
desired if she became the mainspring in the 
movement for inoculating parliaments and, 
of course, cabinets with the business- 
element. 

When the members of trades unions 
strike business frequently gets a black eye. 



IT PAYS TO BE ALERT. 

IT always pays business men to be not 
only on the alert, but to take active 
and immediate steps to remedy griev- 
ances as far as it lies in their power. 

A cable despatch a week or so ago stated 
that the British Government, in asking for 
tenders for supplying Bermuda station with 
flour, specified a brand which was purely a 
product of United States mills. The matter 
attracted some attention from the press in 
Canada at the time, and the comments 
were not by any means favorable to the 
action of the War Office, which should 
have been better informed unless it was 
really desirous of giving the contract to a 
foreign country. 

Mr. F. W. Thompson, the managing- 
director of The Ogilvie Milling Co., when 
he became aware of the condition of 
affairs, immediately drew the attention of 
the Dominion Government to the matter. 
The Government in turn sent a despatch to 
Lord Strathcona, who brought the matter to 
the attention of the War Office. The result 
was that the conditions of the contract were 
amended, and a Canadian company has 
received an order for the flour. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADA'S PROBABLE LONDON AGENT. 



RUMORS current in the daily papers 
lend plausibility to the general belief 
that a Canadian trade commissioner 
will very shortly be appointed to take 
charge of this country's commercial interests 
in London. Several names have appeared 
in print as likely appointees, but so far as 
we can make out the name of the man who 
will in all probability get the position has 
not yet been suggested. Mr. James Cum- 
mings, of Lyn, who has been mentioned, 
and who made an excellent report after 
conducting investigations as special com- 
missioner to Africa, is indeed a strong man, 
but his chances for the appointment are 
considered slim. Another aspirant is Mr. 
Peter Ball, of Toronto, a nephew of the 
late Hon. George Brown, who, if he 
possesses similar abilities to his distinguished 
relative, would fill the office well. 

But we have good authority for saying 
that neither of these gentlemen will be 
appointed. The Government's choice is 
going to fall on Mr. George Anderson, of 
Toronto. Such is the dictum of a gentle- 
man who is in close touch with the Ottawa 
authorities and who usually knows whereof 
he speaks. 

True, Mr. Anderson is at present on his 
way to the Yukon, but this is merely a 
preliminary canter, for he is working for 
the Government along trade lines there. 

Mr. Anderson has excellent qualifications 
for the post. Six years ago he was special 
trade commissioner to Japan. Business 
men will recall the good work he did there 
and the splendid report on Japanese condi- 
tions which he prepared. Ever since he 
showed the trade possibilities of the Eastern 
country, Canadian business has grown in 
the Orient. 

To review the situation, the movement 
for the appointment of a commissioner 
began early last year when Mr. George H. 
Hees, of Toronto, addressed the Manufac- 
turers' Association on the subject. He had 
experienced the advantages of the presence 
of Mr. G. S. Larke in Australia and urged 
that London should be similarly equipped 
with a commissionership. Since then the 
press and the Manufacturers' Association 
have carried on an active campaign to 
secure an appointment and this paper has 



not been behind in lending support to the 
movement. At the last interview between 
the Government and the Association, it was 
intimated that an appropriation had been 
made, which The Globe announced next 
day amounted to $20,000. At the same 
time the Hon. G. W. Ross promised assis- 
tance to the amount of $5,000. There can 
be no further doubt that the Government 
will establish a trade commissioner in a 
good building in London within the next 
six weeks. 



LINSEED OIL AND TURPENTINE 
LOWER. 



G 



UITE a marked decline has taken 
place in Canada this week in the 
price of both linseed oil and tur- 
pentine. In linseed oil the reduction is 3c. 
and In turpentine 2c. per gal. The decline 
in both instances appears to be due more to 
local influences than to outside market con- 
ditions. 

Turpentine has been weaker in Savannah, 
but on Tuesday prices were firmer and quo- 
tations were advanced %c. per gal. in New 
York in sympathy. Since then there has 
been a further appreciation in the primary 
market. But while this improvement was 
taking place in the outside markets the local 
market was taking an opposite course. 
Stocks here have been light for some time. 
Early in the week, however, a small ship- 
ment arrived which relieved immediate 
necessities. And on Tuesday, owing to the 
near approach of a large shipment, the market 
broke and prices were marked down 2c. 
per gal., as already pointed out. The weak- 
ness that existed on the Savannah market 
until a few days ago was due to large 
receipts at that and other ports in the South. 

At the time of writing the tone of the 
turpentine market is strong. And should 
it continue so it is quite possible that 
there will be some recovery in prices in 
Canada before the week closes. 

Competition among the domestic crushers 
is the cause of the decline in linseed oil, 
although the fact that some shipments have 
recently arrived in Montreal from Great 
Britain has doubtless exercised some influ- 
ence. Stocks of linseed oil in Toronto are 
light, and an improvement in the demand 



might possibly lead to an improvement in 
prices. 

It is perhaps worthy of note that the 
importation of turpentine into Canada 
during the 11 months of the fiscal 
year ending May 31 last is less 
than during the same period in 190 1, thp 
quantity being 670,362 and 701,171 gallons 
respectively. In the imports of linseed oil, 
however, the results are the opposite. 
During the 11 months ending May, 1901, 
the quantity imported was 33,886 gallons, 
while for the same period this year the 
figures were 49.193 gallons. This increase 
is altogether due to the larger imports from 
the United States, the quantity from that 
country being 38,189 gallons in 1902 and 
17,714 gallons in 1901. The imports from 
Great Britain were 15,636 gallons in the 
the latter year and 11,004 gallons in the 
former. 

MARITIME BOARD OF TRADE. 

ACTIVE preparations are being made 
by the officers of the Maritime 
Board of Trade for the annual 
convention, which is to be held in Sydney, 
Cape Breton, the third week in August. 
This body, which is composed of leading 
business men in the Maritime Provinces, is 
yearly becoming more important, and its 
influence is necessarily becoming greater in 
public affairs, particularly in matters apper- 
taining to the commercial welfare of the 
Maritime Provinces. 

The fact that the meeting is to be held in 
Sydney lends more than usual interest to it. 
We are not aware what subjects are being 
prepared for discussion, but we may depend 
upon it that they will be of the usual inter- 
esting character. There is one subject 
which we would like to see discussed, and 
that is, Confederation of Canada and New- 
foundland. There is no class of business 
men in Canada more concerned in this 
question than the business men of the 
Maritime Provinces, and there are none^ 
who are, therefore, in a better position to 
discuss it in a more intelligent manner. It 
is to be hoped the officers of the board will 
see the wisdom of giving some attention to 
this important subject. 

Business men's organizations are gradu- 
ally extending their influence. And the 
more this influence is extended the better 
may we expect to see the affairs of the 
country administered. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



n 



"Firsts' and "Seconds' in Graniteware. 



THE subject of "firsts" and "seconds" 
in graniteware, and the desirability of 
having each class stamped, has en- 
gaged the attention of the hardware trade 
at different times. The trouble arose in the 
first place with the custom among certain 
manufacturers of selling a second class of 
goods, chipped or disfigured in some other 
way, to department stores, which took, 
frequently, the whole of a manufacturer's 
stock, buying them at very low prices and 
selling them at a very small margin. This 
hurt the trade of the regular hardware 
dealer, who handled nothing but " firsts," 
and could not compete, as regards price, 
in any way with the dealer in " seconds." 
Customers, however, knowing nothing of 
the difference between the two classes of 
goods, paid little attention to a rough edge 
or other defacement, and thought they were 
getting a very great bargain. 

When the dealer in " firsts " quoted his 
prices, he was met with, "But I can get 

this at 's at half that price." He 

then had to explain that the goods offered 
at half the price must have been a poorer 
quality, but such an explanation to one who 
could not recognize the difference in value 
had only very little effect. Had he been 
able to say to the customer, " If you look 

at this cheap graniteware of 's you 

will see the word ' seconds ' or ' second 
grade' stamped on it," his remarks would 
have carried more weight. But there was 
no stamp to refer to. The only way to dis- 
tinguish was that the first grades were 
stamped, while the second had no stamp 
whatever. 

Now and then there appears on the 
market, usually in department stores, some 
second-grade white enamelware. This is 
usually imported from Germany. But 
according to manufacturers there are no 
" seconds " in graniteware whatever. They 
are no longer sold on this market and have 
not been for some time. 

In regard to this it might be well to 
quote the manager of one of the largest 
Canadian manufacturers of graniteware, 
with factory at Montreal. He said to a 
representative of Hardware and Metal : 



A MANUFACTURER'S EXPLANATION. 

" If the members of the retail trade believe 
that the manufacturers are selling ' seconds' 
to the department stores, or, for that matter, 
to any other kind of store, they are very 
much mistaken. No Canadian manufac- 
turer has sold anything but firsts on this 
market since last year. I am quite positive 
of that. We used to do it, but came to the 
conclusion that it would be to our own 
advantage, as well as to the advantage of 
the retailer, to stop. Now, all ' seconds ' 
are sold out of the country, and it would be 
impossible for a retailer to buy any unless 
he sent to another country for them, which, 
of course, would be absurd. 

"We have often been told that we should 
not give the department stores better prices 
than the dealer who bought only in small 
quantities. That's a subject, of course, 
which allows of a good many arguments on 
both sides. The department stores, of 
course, use these goods a great deal for 
advertising purposes, and frequently sell 
them below cost. We do not care to see 
that any more than the retailer. The 
department store trade hurts us as well as 
them. But the fact is, that if we refuse to 
sell to them, as one or two of our customers 
have suggested, they would merely get the 
goods somewhere else, perhaps even import 
a second grade of goods and sell it at a 
price that wou'd be even harder on the 
regular dealer. It is a subject that affects 
every trade almost — dry goods, groceries, 
books and others besides hardware — and 
there is no way out of it that I can see." 



RECEIVED THANKS OF KING 
EDWARD. 

Mr. Geo. Stephens, MP., one of the most 
r. romin ?r t hardware merchants of Chatham, 
is rejoicing over the good fortune which has 
befallen his elderly colored domestic, Mrs. 
Gale. This estimable old lady has a high 
standing in her section of the city as a 
" vaudoo," and.accordingly.is paid peculiar 
reverence. 

Eighty years or so ago, before being in a 
position to enjoy British freedom and justice, 
she purchased a highly ornamented prayer 
totem, which, lettered on parchment, was 
held to be extremely efficacious in warding 
off evil. 

As soon as she heard of His Majesty's 
illness, the loyal old lady sent it to him with 



instructions for its use, and, as by a peculiar 
coincidence, it arrived at the most critical 
period after the operation, she attributes her 
liege lord's recovery to its powers. 

A day or so ago a letter of thanks, 
signed by the King himself, arrived, and 
now a keepsake, which is too valuable for 
common eyes to feast on, is held by her in 
the highest esteem. 



GOOD ADVERTISING POINTERS. 

THE prime object of advertising is to 
create a demand for an article. How 
many can pick the better of two 
pianos from which the brand has been 
removed ? Yet men will pay more for an 
article whose name has become a household 
word by judicious advertising. Men some- 
times say that if they had something new 
or exclusive they could succeed ; but this is 
a mistake. 

The cash register wouldn't go for years ; 
the same way with the typewriters. There 
is nothing harder to advertise than new 
commodities. But judicious advertising 
can create wants and tastes. The con- 
sumption of oatmeal in Kansas City has 
increased six fold in ten years. 

H. J. Heinz once told me that a merchant 
was a man who sold goods at his own price. 
The test of a real merchant is to create a 
distinctive demand for his goods, and to 
compel the people to buy them. 

All there is in advertising is in carrying a 
message to the dealer and consumer. No 
medium should be used blindly. A great 
many use newspapers just as the Indian 
slept on one feather because the white man 
slept on a feather bed, and he wondered 
why the feather didn't help him. 

The ultimate object of all advertising is 
the creation of prestige. People accept 
what a successful man says. Prestige 
doesn't come to everybody over night. It 
is acquired by persistent adherence to 
fundamental principles. It creates a peculiar 
constituency and as near a monopoly as is 
possible in these days. — John Lee Mahin, 
in Michigan Tradesman. 



WHERE STOVES ARE NOT USED. 

The following is the report, in full, of 
United States Acting Consul Childs at Zan- 
zibar: 

"Zanzibar. — Referring to the instruction 
to prepare a report on heating and cooking 
stoves, I beg leave to state that stoves are 
never used in Zanzibar. This, I think, 
entirely covers the subject." 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RAILWAYS IN THE WEST. 

IN his annual report, J. S. Dennis, 
Deputy Commissioner of Agriculture, 
deals thoroughly with the Territorial 
railway question. He says in part : '* This 
question is allied to our road problem be- 
cause thickly settled districts which now 
have to deliver their produce to existing 
railways by long hauls over roads that we 
are called upon to improve, will abandon 
such roads the moment they are within 
reach of the nearer railway facilities which 
will be provided by branch lines that sooner 
or later will form a network throughout the 
Territories. At the present time we have 
thickly settled districts, which produce large 
grain crops, situated 30 and 40 miles from 
the nearest railway station, and labor and 
hardship consequent upon haulage of grain 
for that distance to market. 

"The situation in this respect throughout 
the Saskatchewan Valley will be relieved by 
the extension westward of the Canadian 
Northern Railway. 

" In portions of Eastern Assiniboia, 
which at present produce the larger portion 
of the wheat crop of the Territories, the 
need of branch line railways is very acute. 
"Throughout the whole length of Eastern 
Assiniboia the main line of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway runs parallel to and some 
distance south of the Qu' Appelle River, and 
the thickly-settled districts lying north of 
the river are cut off from railway communi- 
cation except by long hauls, including the 
crossing of the Valley of the Qu' Appelle 
with its steep hills. This condition has 
necessitated an attempt on the part of the 
Department to provide and maintain long 
main roads north and south across this 
valley. 

"In Southeastern Assiniboia the necessity 
for further railway extension is also becom- 
ing pressing, and as the country between 
the main line and Soo branch of the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway has developed in the 
way of settlement in a marked degree 
during the past year, it is evident that an 
extension of the Pipestone branch of that 
railway through this district will become an 
urgent necessity within the coming year, if 
these settlers are to be provided with such 
railway facilities as will obviate a long haul 
for the large amount of grain that they will 
probably raise in the near future. 

"The construction of the projected 
branch line of the Canadian Pacific Railway 
north of and parallel to the valley, which is 
looked for this year, will at once relieve the 
residents of the country traversed by this 
branch line of the present long haul to the 
main line, and will altogether change the 
present trend of travel over the roads and 
bridges we have been striving to provide. 



' ' Anyone who thoroughly studies the 
question will easily recognize the necessity 
for immediate railway extension to provide 
for the great development which had taken 
place in the past few years." 



NOVEL GAS FIRES. 

Everyone delights in the log fire of our 
ancestors. Those hissing and spluttering 
tree chunks, however, cannot be used in 
hotels, where labor must necessarily be 
curtailed to the utmost limit. 

Hence, proprietors desirous of pleasing 
their guests have turned to the log gas 




fires, which can be fixed in ordinary grates, 
or, for better effect, can be stood upon and- 
irons in a beautifully tiled recess. Thus a 
healthy and warm glow can be promptly 
obtained with practically no trouble to the 
maids or attendants. The fire is ready at 
all times, and all seasons — a great consid- 
eration in a variable climate such as ours — 
and, of course, makes neither ashes nor 
dust. The logs are made in upwards of 30 
designs and patterns, upright for ordinary 
grates, whilst a large number of designs, 
including the split stick, the three stick, 
and the fork stick logs, are prepared for 
use with the brass and copper dogs and 
andirons. 

" Ye Old Yule Log " is strikingly popu- 
lar for comfort, cleanliness and convenience. 



DEATH OF J. A. CHIPMAN. 

The death of J. A. Chipman, of Halifax, 
occurred Friday, July 18. Deceased was 
about 55 years of age. He was a native of 
Annapolis, and resided at 27 Inglis street. 
He came to Halifax when young, and for 
years was in the flour business, but latterly 
was engaged in the commission business. 
He was a prominent member of the board 
of trade, and the promoter of the resolution 
urging that the C.P.R. take over the I.C.R. 
between St. John and Halifax, which pro- 
voked much discussion a few months ago. 
Mr. Chipman was for years a member of 
the firm of Chipman & Mutch, which firm 
did an extensive business. Up to the time 
of his death he did business under the 
name of J. A. Chipman & Co. He leaves 
a widow and a daughter. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

The American H ardware Corporation of 
New Britain, Conn., announce the election 
of Mr. A. N. Abbe, of New Britain as pur- 
chasing agent. 

Mr. C. R. Peckover, of Bainei & Peck- 
over, dealers in bar iron, bolts, rivets, etc., 
Bay street, Toronto, is spending his holidays 
in Northern Ontario. 

Mr. C. L. Lightfoot, manager of the 
Gurney Foundry Company, Vancouver, 
stated after his return from a four weeks' 
trip through the Kootenays and Boundary 
country that business was fairly quiet, 
though satisfactory in his own line. He 
said he found a tendency among the up- 
country merchants to place orders with the 
Coast firms in preference to eastern houses. 



LARGE ORDER FOR STAINED GLASS. 

After some years in building, the Jesuits' 
Memorial Church at Penetanguishene is 
about completed, and in consequence a 
large order for decorative and stained glass 
windows has been placed with the Luxfer 
Prism Co., of Toronto. It was not before 
the committee had very carefully looked 
into the merits of the goods that this was 
finally decided upon, but after comparing 
with others, it was decided to give them the 
orders. 

A large portion of the windows are to be 
installed in August, and the figure windows 
soon afterwards, as the members of the 
congregation are anxious to have the church 
opened early this fall. The outsides of 
the windows are all guarded with expanded 
metal. 

TRADE CHAT. 

The contract for the new public library 
building, Chatham, was let on Monday to 
Robertson & McKie, of that place, at 
$15,589. 

Mr. D. Drummond, of the Montreal 
Pipe Company, stated at St. John the other 
day in connection with their recent heavy 
fires at Londonderry that there was a 
chance for St. John to secure the Acadia 
Mines Mills if concessions were made. It 
is stated that the Bank of Montreal wants 
to have the works rebuilt at Londonderry. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



RIVAL COMPANIES FOR NIAGARA 
POWER. 

ON Tuesday, July 22, The Canadian 
Niagara Power Company inter- 
viewed Hon. Messrs. Harcourt, 
Stratton and Latchford of the Provincial 
Government in reference to the new agree- 
ment with The Ontario Power Company. 

The Canadian Power Company asked 
that before the new agreement with the 
Ontario Power Company be ratified by the 
Government they should be heard before 
the Park Commissioners, and that they 
should be furnished with full particulars and 
dimensions of the proposed works of The 
Ontario Power Company, in order that their 
engineers may judge if the new works will 
interfere with the flow of water to the intake 
of the Canadian company's works. 

J. W. Langmuir, representing the 
Park Commissioners, explained that by the 
agreement of April, 1899, the monopoly of 
the Canadian company was done away 
with. Immediately the Commissioners 
entered into an agreement with the Ontario 
company, giving them the right to take 
water from the Welland River and lead it 
to the park, where they had a right to 
develop power immediately under the bank 
surrounding the park, and then to lead it 
through the park to Table Rock House, to 
a power house to be constructed in the 
gorge below the falls. 

In the early part of this year the Ontario 
Company desired to secure the privilege of 
taking water from Niagara River at Dufferin 
Islands in addition to that from the Welland 
P-iver, leading it across the park to join 
their canal from the Welland River. The 
commissioners were willing to grant this 
privilege on certain conditions to which the 
company agreed. These were that instead 
of an open canal through the park the water 
should be led by underground pipes, that 
the right to the first development under the 
bank should be abandoned, and that the 
Table Rock House should be raised and that 
crucial part of the park made more in har- 
mony with a state of nature. The company 
further agreed to pay for the supplementary 
privilege, the same as if they were granted 
new rights. 

Mr. Rankine, on behalf of the Canadian 
company, said he simply wished it to be 
thoroughly examined into whether the 
granting of such powers as had been con- 
ferred by the commissioners would not 
operate against them in the flow of water 
into their intake. He asked for a hearing 
before the Park Commissioners before the 
Order- in-Council was approved. The com- 
pany's engineers said the new works might 
interfere with the Canadian company's in- 
take, but their plans were not sufficiently 



The Value of Quality. 



The one thing and the most essential thing in any article that dis- 
tinguishes it, that makes it better and more satisfactory than other 
similar articles in quality. 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

has every essential of quality. It's a well made paint — one that always 
gives satisfaction to the user and never brings discredit on the dealer. 
It's a paint that a dealer may pass over the counter and be certain of 
good results. 

In addition to intrinsic worth, it has the selling qualities that build 
up trade and make money for the dealer. It's well advertised and is 
known and sold all over Canada. 

Our B-13 booklet tells how Sherwin-Williams Quality and Sherwin- 
Williams Advertising builds up paint business. Write for it to-day. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO. 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON. SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY 




detailed to enable a positive judgment to be 
made. 

On behalf of the Ontario company, Mr. 
Z. A. Lash stated that this was an agree- 
ment between his company and the com- 
missioners, and that the Canadian company 
were not interested in this matter. This 
was the one season when work could be 
carried on ; his company have made their 
arrangements, and the delay that would be 
involved by the course suggested was of 
consequence. The duty of the commission- 
ers towards the Canadian company was a 
question that might safely be left in the 
hands of the Government. 

Speaking for the Canadian company, Mr. 
Wallace Nesbitt, K.C., stated that the com- 
pany's engineers had said that the new 
intake would interfere with their works, 
although they could not make a definite 
statement until they had more detailed 
maps, showing dimensions and methods of 
construction. They asked that the matter 
should be referred back to the commis- 
sioners, where they wanted to be heard. 

Mr. Harcourt suggested a friendly settle- 
ment ; the Government were anxious to see 
both companies prosper and prosecute their 
works with all speed and diligence, and 
wanted nothing to happen which would 
couse delay. He promised to give an 
answer to the companies in two or three days. 



A VISITING HARDWAREMAN. 

Mr. Thomas Marshall, of Congdon & 
Marshall, hardware dealers. Dunnville, 
Ont., was in Montreal this week, and spent 
several days visiting his friends among the 
wholesale trade and taking in the sights 
generally. Mr. Marshall was much inter- 
ested in the picturesque features of the city, 
especially some of the older buildings 
erected under the French regime, as he is a 
bit of an antiquary. He was much struck 
with the establishment of E. Cavanaugh & 
Co., on Notre Dame street, one of the best 
equipped hardware stores in the country. 
Considering that the place was nearly two 
miles from the real business centre of the 
city the store was a surprise, both on account 
of its splendid appearance and the amount 
of business done. All the staff are in 
uniform, and the goods in the store and 
windows are very artistically displayed. The 
showcases of cutlery, gun materials and 
other lines were more like an exhibition 
than an ordinary store display. The lock- 
room, where the handsomest locks procur- 
able are displayed, received great praise 
from Mr. Marshall, and he warmly con- 
gratulated Mr. Cavanaugh and his able 
assistant, Mr. Default, on the admirable 
appearance of the place. 



John Fairley, general merchant, Carberry, 
Man., is succeeded by T. R. Brough. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS MEET. 

THE regular monthly meeting of the 
hardware section of the Retail 
Merchants' Association of Canada 
was held in their boardroom, corner Bay 
and Richmond streets, Toronto, on July 17, 
1902, E. R. Rogers in the chair. 

The chairman explained to the members 
the action that had been taken at their last 
meeting regarding the amalgamation of the 
Retail Hardware Association, and the forma- 
tion of the hardware section of the Retail 
Merchants' Association of Canada, and 
trusted that it would result in great benefit 
to hardwaremen, not only in the city, but 
to those throughout the Province. 

The question of holding a Provincial con- 
vention on September 9 and 10 was fully 
concurred in, and the following subjects 
among others were proposed for discussion, 
and will be submitted to the various branches 
throughout the Province: 

1st. The best plan of organization, as laid out by 
the Association, so that direct communication can 
be obtained between all sections of the hardware 
trade throughout the Province. 

2nd. The best plan to adopt to bring about 
better conditions for the retailing of hardware. 

3rd. What proportion of expense should be 
added to hardware merchandise so as to ascertain 
the actual cost ? 

4th. What should the general profit be on goods 
sold in everyday business, such as nails and heavy 
hardware, granite and tinware, paints, oils and 
glass, poultry netting, stoves, spades and shovels, 
harvesting tools, etc.? 

5th. The injurious effect department store 
methods have on the retail hardware trade, and 
the best way to remedy it. 

6th. The effect on the retail trade caused by 
wholesalers and manufacturers selling direct to 
consumers. 

7th. The advisability of holding joint conferences 
with wholesalers and manufacturers, so as to 
exchange suggestions for trade improvements. 

It is proposed that members from various 
towns read papers on the above subjects, 
and all unite upon some common plan for 
future work. 

The question of selling second quality 
graniteware for first quality was very fully 
entered upon, and, when the subject comes 
up at the convention, the question will be 
considered as to the advisability of having 
a mark placed upon first and second 
quality goods, so that the public will be able 
to discriminate between them. 



LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONES- 

The entire telephone system throughout 
Lewis Bros. & Co.'s establishment at Mont- 
real is being converted into a long distance 
service. This will be a great convenience 
to customers at outside points, especially in 
such weather as has prevailed lately, and 
will doubtless have the effect of increasing 
the number of orders from the surrounding 
places to Lewis Bros. 



The name IVER JOHNSON on a SINGLE BARREL 
SHOT GUN stands for absolute DEPENDABILITY 

A result which has established for it a world-wide reputation; has eaused the 

trade to prefer it to all others, and the public to demand it. 
To produce the best that money can buy, that experience can produce, is our 

CONSTANT AIM. 




Semi-Hammerless. Trigger Action. Ejector, or Non-Ejector. 
12, 16-Gauge. 28, 30, 32, 34-ln. barrel. 

LIGHT SURE SAFE 

Send for new Catalogue just published. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CY CLE WORKS, 

New Vork Salesroom: 99 Chambers St. S W FITCHBURG, MASS. 

THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

. . . Successors to . . . 
The Toronto Branch of THE COPP BROS. CO., Limited. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Mantels, Orates, Tiles, etc. Coal Grates. Gas Grates. Gas Logs. 

HOT-AIR REOISTERS A SPECIALTY. 

Stove repairs for the Copp Bros', make of Stoves and Furnaoes. 

New Address-76 York: St., TORONTO. 





if 


j_ j_._„ 


5^05^? 


61 Page Metal Ornamental Fence. ^ThTws 




13 






is wanted for door yards, division fences in town lots, grave 










■ Pfntd^^tafkat^only 20 C,S - PER RUNN,NG F °° T - 








1 


.p. Just think of it. Let us send you full particulars. We also 
make farm fence, poultry netting, nails and staples. 










Pff The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 8 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
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HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO, 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers. 

Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



Hardware Men Sell 

Our Popular Lines 

from Catalogues and Samples. 

WE MANUFACTURE 

Office and Bank Railings, 

Wire Window Guards, Stable Fittings, 
Roof Cresting Fencing. Etc. 

Specialties in Wire and Metal. 

Our manufactures arc wanted everywhere. We 

want a hardware firm in every town to act as our 

Belling agents. Write for particulars and catalogues. 



The Dennis Wire and Iron Go, 



LONDON, ONT. 



TRADE WITH ENGLAND 

Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with the Old Country 
should read 

1 ' Commercial Intelligence' ' 

(The address is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 4 cents per week, includ- 
ing postage. (Annual subscription, $2.11.) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS i™ 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



Th« 



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CELEBRATED 

GUNPOWDER 



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any other manufacture. A most remarkably and universally popular brand for general 
field and trap shooting. 



SAFETY FUSE 




Hemp Safety Fuse. 
Single Tape Safety Fuse. 
Double Tape Safety Fuse. 



CANADIAN POWDERS 






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Size 4- " 
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A perfect powder for loading rifle cartridges, dense, 
and withstands compression in loading. Absolutely 
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Uniform in velocity and pressure and moist burning. 




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Nos. A and B. 



^csm 



GENUINE 



SCHULTZE SMOKELESS 




Best Hard Grain White Powder made. 

No. 1, Tin ; No. 50, Drum. 

Oldest established. Best known. Most 

reliable. Safer than Black Powder. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED. 



Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



Graham IMails are -the Best. 

Faotory: DutTerln Street. Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



/ i 

MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLY 

DEPARTMENT 



A NEW BAG CONVEYING SYSTEM. 

ANEW YORK machine company 
have just completed a conveyor 
for handling' 250 bags per hour, 
weighing 300 lb. each. The problem in 
this case was to take the bags from cars 
on the track at the side of the building 
to the second floor of a warehouse about 
GO feet wide and several hundred feet 
long. The bags were to be delivered in 
such a way as to reduce the labor re 
quired to stack them in piles to a mini- 
mum. 

A bag elevator is arranged vertically 
just outside of the building, carrying the 
bags on sets of curved projecting arms 
mounted on an endless chain which runs 
between guides. This elevator receives 
the bags directly from the car and dis- 
charges them into an inclined chute ex- 
tending into the building to the centre 
bin, and lying wholly above the bottom 
chord of the roof trusses. The chute 
leads to a conveyor, running the full 
length of the building and carried by 
trussed frames resting on the bottom 
chord of the roof trusses. The conveyor 
has on top a carrying platform made of 
wooden strips so as to present a practi- 
cally continuous floor. At either side of 
the longitudinal conveyor is a cross con- 
veyor, spanning the space from the cen- 
tre of the building to the side walls, and 
having its carrying platform at a lower 
level than that of the main conveyor. 
These cross conveyors form each a sell- 
contained structure, running on tracks 
extending the full length of the building, 
attached along the side walls and along 
bhe centre conveyor trustework. The sys- 
tem of conveyors thus covers the whole 
space of the loft and permits transfer- 
ring bags from the elevator to any de- 
sired point. 

The operation will be readily under- 
stood. The laborers in the car toss the 
bags into a stationary rack placed in the 
path of the projecting arms carried by 
the elevator chain. These projecting 
aims are so spaced as to pass between 
the bars of the rack, and they pick up 
the Iuil: and carry it to the top of the 
building. Here the bags fall into the 
chute, down which they slide to the 
longitudinal conveyor, which carries them 
along to any desired point. The bags 
are unloaded from the conveyor by in- 
clined guide boards, which may be fast- 
ened at any point, and which shove the 
bags off on to a short slide leading to 
the cross conveyor. Prom the latter they 
are in turn unloaded by another guide 



board at the point desired, and by way 
of a hinged skidboard, they slide to their 
place in the stack of bags. The only 
manual labor that remains to be done is 
to slew them around into proper stack- 
ing position. 

The feature of difficulty in the design 
of this plant was to so- construct the 
horizontal conveying platforms that the 
bags could be successfully slid over the 
side by the stationary guide boards 
without risk of catching and tearing. Its 
successful solution makes the plant of 
particular interest to engineers having to 
solve conveying problems in which the 
handling of material in bags is to be 
considered. Two light steel truss frames 
running longitudinally rest on the bot- 
tom chord of the roof trusses. Attached 
to the top longitudinal angle of each of 
these frames is a Coburn track, in which 
roll wheels attached by hanger pieces to 
the conveyor chain. The latter, in turn, 
carries on malleable iron shelf blocks the 
wooden strips that compose the platform 
of the conveyor. Each pair of platform 
strips also carries horizontal guide 
wheels, which maintain its alignment by 
bearing against a longitudinal angle ad- 
jacent to the roller track. The carrying- 
wheels of the conveying chain also sup- 
port the chain on its slack or return 
side, bearing for this purpose on a 
longitudinal shelf angle attached to the 
lower chord of the truss frame. 

The guide board is fitted with project- 
ing strips of wood running along the face 
and pitching slightly upward toward the 
discharging end of the board, the board 
itself leaning backward a little. The 
whole construction is intended, in connec- 
tion with the smooth horizontal surface 
of the conveyor platform, to prevent the 
bags being drawn under the guide board 
when they strike it, and to discharge 
them in proper manner upon the skidway. 
The whole machinery is electrically 
driven. 

DRILLING AND TAPPING MACHINE. 

An English firm has just brought out 
an improved double-geared drilling ma- 
chine fitted with a tapping arrangement 
on balanced slide. The tapping arrange- 
ment, whilst effecting a great saving in 
time and labor, does not interfere with 
the utility of the machine for general 
drilling. The spindle can be immediate- 
ly reversed to withdraw the tap. The 
feed-screw on the spindle can . also be 
quickly disengaged from the nut, thus 
allowing the spindle to be free for quick 
and variable adjustment in working the 
tap or drill. A universal table is carried 
on a strong bracket working from a large 
hinged joint, and this also revolves and 
works on a slide. Universal adjustment 
is thus afforded, and any part of the 
table can be brought under the drill-post. 
An effective arrangement of double gear 
has been adopted, together with an im- 
proved device for changing from single 



to double gear, which is effected in half 
the ordinary time. The machine is made 
in six standard sizes to drill from 8 to 
16 inches deep, and varying in price from 
£38 to £90. 

STOCK LIST OF MACHINERY TOOLS. 

" Hardware and Metal " is in receipt 
of H. W. Petrie's monthly stock list of 
machinery tools and power. The list is 
a neat booklet of 32 pages, containing 
machines for immediate delivery. Each 
machine is designated by an individual 
number, and the exact size of each article 
accompanies the number. 

ORDERS FOR MACHINERY. 

H. W. Petrie, 141-145 Front street west. 
Toronto, reports the following sales dur- 
ing the week : To Kilmaster & Mabee. 
of the new Bay Cliffe Hotel, Port Rowan, 
a large Racine electro-vapor launch ; 
also a gasoline engine and an upright 
pump ; to The Port Rowan Electric 
Light Company, a new boiler for their 
plant ; to Gagelan, Gamble & Place, 
Port Rowan, a new sticker cut-off saw, 
etc., for their planing mill ; to E. T. 
Smith. Concepcion, Chili, a new auto- 
matic knife grinder. 

ELECTRICAL NOTES. 

The Canadian Locomotive Works, 
Kingston, Ont., have purchased from 
Jones & Moore, 22 Adelaide street west. 
Toronto, two 30-kilowatt generators for 
lighting their premises. 

The Cannington Electric Light Com- 
pany have placed their order with Jones 
& Moore, 22 Adelaide street west, To- 
ronto, for a GO-kilowatt power generator 
for supplying current to the several 
motors throughout the town. 

The strike of the Toronto electrical 
workers is now over. The differences were 
adjusted July 21, by a settlement, where- 
by, for the future, the union receives re- 
cognition and the minimum wage will be 
25 cents an hour for eight hours a day. 
This agreement will remain in force until 
March 1. 1904. 

The Government is installing electricity 
in the Orillia Asylum for idiots. At 
Ragged Rapids, on the Severn River, 
some 18 miles from the asylum, 1,51111 
horse -power has been developed, and 
2,500 additional is available. The Gov- 
ernment will purchase the power at $18 
per horse-power, and will use it for light- 
ing, pumping, laundry work. etc. 

The Modern Telephone Company, of 
Hamilton, Limited, has been formed with 
a share capital of $300,000. The pro- 
visional directors are : Oscar Wentworth 
Rogers, Fritz Loftier, of New York ; 
Staunton King, William Asahel John- 
son, Henry Alexander Druuimond, Whit 
ford Vandusen, Samuel Clarke Biggs and 
Joseph Boardman Scovell, all of To- 
ronto. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



WANTED-- 



AN AGENT 
TO SELL 



Stocks, Dies and Taps and other En- 
gineers' Hand Tools and Platelayers' 
Tools to Hardware Factors, Railroad 
Companies and Mines, on a commission 
basis. Apply, 

Easterbrook, Allcard & CO., 

4 LIMITED. 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 



Are you in need oi Machinery? 

The following is a partial list of machines, 
I have in stock for immediate shipment : 

Boilers of every Description. 

Engines, Plain and Automatic. 

Triple Expansion Marine Kusines. 

Tandem Compound Marine Engines. 

Vertical Marine Engines. 

Screw Cut ing Engine Lathes. 

Speed Lathes. 

Turret Lathes. 

Wood Turniog Lathes. 

Iron Planers and Shapers. 

Upright Drilling Machines. 

Friction and Sensitive Drilling Machines. 

Radial Drilling Machines. 

Mining Drills. 

Gear Cutting Machines. 

Boring and Turning Mills. 

Also a large assortment of Tinsmiths' Tools. 

Write for monthly Lists and Prices. 
H. W. PETRIE, 14M45 Front St. W.. Toronto 



Blacksmiths' 

Hand 

Drills. 

The very 
best. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 




THE ADAMS STOVE PIPE REGISTER. 



Design Patented 
June 29, 1897. 

Design Patented 
August 31, 1897. 

Made by 

The Adams 

Company 

Dubuque, 
Iowa, U.S.A. 





"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices 

c 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of- 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 



STANYON ENGINEERING CO. 



Phone Main 2177. 



402 MCKINNON BUILDING, 



^TORONTO 



CONTRACTING AND CONSULTING ENGINEERS. 

Steel Works, all kinds of Rolling Mills, Wire Mills, etc., all built complete. Machinery designed for any purpose 
General Offices, - PITTSBURG, Pa. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York : 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. Galvanized Plain Wire 

Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RULES FOR ELECTRICAL WIRING. 

IN DISCUSSING the question of safe 
rules for electrical work a writer in 
a recent issue of Electricity [.resents 
the following : 

A workman should thoroughly famil- 
iarize himself with the rules and require 
ments of the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters before attempting to do any 
electrical construction. The rules are all 
based on pood engineering practice, and 
an> a necessity for the prevention of un 
reliable and dangerous work. A few of 
the more important suggestions given 
in tin 1 code and applicable to all electric 
light, heat or power construction are as 

follows : 

In all electric work, conductors, how 
ever well insulated, should be treated as 
I. are. to the end that under no eondi- 
tions, existing or likely to exist, can a 
grounding or short circuit occur ; and so 
thai all leakage from conductor, or be- 
tween conductor and ground, may be re- 
duced to the minimum. 

In all wiring special attention must be 
paid to the mechanical execution of the 
work. Careful and neat running, con- 
necting, soldering, taping of conductors 
and securing and attaching of fittings, 
are specially conducive to security and 
efficiency, and will lie strongly insisted 
upon. 

Wires must not be of smaller size than 
X,,. II I',. cV S., except when used for 
wiring fixtures or by special permission. 
Wires must be separated from contact 
with walls, floors, limbers, or partitions 
through which they may pass by non- 
conibustiluj. non - absorptive insulating 
tubes, such as glass or porcelain. Bush- 
ings must be lonu enough to bush the 
entjre length of the hole in one continu- 
ous piece. 

Transformers must not be placed in- 
side of any building, excepting central 
stations, unless by special permission of 
the inspection department, having juris- 
diction. They must not be attached to 
the outside' ' walls of buildings, unless 
separated therefrom by substantial sup- 
ports. 

Switches must be placed on all service 
wires, either overhead or underground, in 
a readily accessible place, as nearly as 
possible to the point where the wires 
enter the building, and arranged to cut 
cl |i' the entire current. Knife switches 
must be so placed that gravity will tend 
to open rather than close (he switch. 
They must not be single pole, except 
where the circuits which they control 
supply mil more than six 16 candle- 
power lamps, or their equivalent. 

Automatic fuse cut-outs must be placed 
on all service wires, either overhead or 
underground, as nearly as possible to the 

point where they enter the building ami 
inside the walls, and arranged to cut oil 
id,, entire current from the building. 
They must be placed at every point 
throughout a system, where a change is 
made in the size of wire I unless the cut 
,,ut in tin' larger wire will protect the 
mailer). All cut - outs must be in plain 
sight, or inclosed in an approved box. 
and readily accessible. They must not b" 
placed in the canopies or shells of fix 
t ures. 

Circuits or- groups of incandescent 
(amp requiring men' than 660 watts 



must not be dependent on one cut out. 
Special permission may be secured for 
departure from this rule in case of large 
chandeliers, stage borders, and illumin- 
ated si l; ns . 

The following is a table showing the 
safe carrying capacity of conductors ol 
different sizes in B. cv. S. gauge as given 
in the rules : 



B &S. 



ooo 

OOCO 



Rubber 


Weatber 


covered 


proof 


wires. 


wires. 


\mperts. 


Amperes. 


1 


<; 


6 


8 


12 


16 


17 


»3 


24 


3* 


33 


46 


46 


65 


54 


77 


65 


92 


76 


no 


90 


'3' 


I, 7 


156 


127 


.85 


15° 


220 


177 


262 


210 


3T2 



Circular 
Mils. 
1,024 
2,58? 
4,107 

6,5'° 
10, j2o 
l6,sro 
26.250 
33,100 
41, 74^ 

52 630 
f6 370 
81.650 
105,500 
133.100 
167 8-0 
21- cV o 



No fuse must have a rated capacity ex- 
ceeding the allowable carrying capacity 
of the wire it protects. 

In open-work wiring supports must be 
placed at no greater distance than i!, 
feet apart. 

AUXILIARY STEAM PLANT. 

Arrangements have been made by The 
Hamilton Electric Light and Cataract 
Power Company to manufacture and in- 
stal next year a steam plant at the Vic- 
toria avenue sub-station. Hamilton. It 
will have a capacity of 3,500 horse-power, 
and it is calculated to insure a contin- 
uity of service, even under the most un- 
favorable circumstances, such as damage 
by storms, etc.. to the electrical plant. 



MACHINERY FIRM FAILS. 

Geo. T. Pendrith <.V. Co.. 71 Adelaide 
street west, Toronto, dealers in machin- 
ery, have assigned to E. R. C. Clarkson. 
Fifty-four creditors have filed claims to 
the assignee to the amount of nearly 
§25,000. The amount of the assets is 
not known, but a statement will prob- 
ably be presented at a meeting of the 
creditors, which has been called for 
Aliens! I. Local linns are in the major- 
ity of the creditors, but the heaviest 
claim is that of the Brodie estate of 
Guelph, which amounts to $17,874. It is 
understood that offers of a settlement 
have been refused. 



CHEAP ELECTRIC LIGHT SERVICE. 

The New York Edison Company and 
The United Electric Light and Power 
Company, which practically control the 
electric lieht service of New York and 
which are working in unison as to a 
schedule of prices, have decided to make 
a reduction of 25 pel' cent, in the price 
of electric lieht service, the reduction to 
take effect September I. 

The circular of The United Electric 
Light and Power Company is as follows : 
" We bee |o announce that the retail 
prices for- the incandescent service of this 
company will be reduced on and after 
September I. from the present maximum 
of i!ll cents to a maximum of 15 cents a 
kilowatt hour-. The full schedule, after 
that date, will be. for' the first two 
hours' average daily use of the connected 



installation. 15 cents a kilowatt hour ; 
for the third and fourth hours, 10 cents ; 
for the fifth and sixth hours, 7.\c; and 
for all over six hours. 5 cents a kilowatt 
hour. To a large number of the users 
of electric befits this change will repres- 
ent a substantial reduction in the cost of 
current." 

One of the officials of The United Light 
and Power Company, in speaking of the 
forthcoming cut, said : " Our step will' 
prove of considerable benefit to apart- 
ment houses, private residences and small 
retail stores." 

GAS ENGINE TROUBLES. 

HC. MUELLER gives " Hardware 
and Metal " readers the benefit 
t of his experience with gas and 
gasoline engines. He gives the following 
helpful hints : The first thing to do when 
an engine slops is to look after- simple 
things. Don't look for complications 
until it is necessary. See that the gaso- 
line tank is not empty, even although 
you may think it is half full. See that 
the igniter is in proper working order. 
See that the exhaust valve opens at the 
rieht time and does not leak when 
closed. Sometimes the air Valve will 
stick or not close properly. Overheating 
often stops an engine, especially when the 
piston is worn a little. Many an engine 
stops for want of lubrication. It may 
get plenty of oil. but not in the right 
place, and often the oil is the wrong 
kind. Oil that will stand the highest 
possible temperature and make the least 
smoke and soot is what is wanted. Ex 
periments usually are expensive, and the 
best is none loo good when it comes to 
cylinder oil. 

The " jump spark." if properly under- 
stood, is by far the best system of igni- 
tion, as it is plain and simple, very re- 
liable, easy to set right when wrong, and 
a good outfit seldom acts wrong, al- 
though it is to be remembered that the 
points should be' close together on the 
sparking plug, as the spark is much hot- 
ter and the strain on the insulation is 
much less, both on coil and plug. 

And another thine- is to be remembered: 
that is, if a coil makes a spark one inch 
lone in the air. it will not spurt one- 
fourth that distance in a compressed mix- 
ture of gas and air. and the higher the 
compression the more it will affect the 
spark. The insulation from coil to plug 
inusi be the best that can be made, for 
there is where lots of trouble comes from, 
and either the engine or the coil should 
have a vibrator', and if properly made, 
it will work without fail. An excessively, 
hieh compression is not desirable, as 
what is gained in one way is lost in an- 
other. 

DISSATISFIED ELECTRICAL MEN. 

It is said that some dissatisfaction ex 
ists among the electrical workers in the 
employ of The Hamilton Electric Lieht 
and Cataract Power Company, Hamil- 
ton, because of the lack of progress made 
in the matter of the select ion of a third 
arbitrator by A. Bruce, K.C., and Rev, 

('. E. Whitcombe. The latter' is the 

arbitrator chosen by the men. and he has 
gone on a holiday, under- the impression 
that Mr. Bruce is blocking the selection 
of a third arbitrator. Another' strike is 
threatening. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 



PICTURESQUE VICTORIA. 



»• 



F 



JCTURESQUE VICTORIA " is a 
handsome little booklet just issued 
by the Tourist Association, of Vic- 
toria, B.C. This voluntary association, 
organized by the business men and citizens 
for the purpose of making known the 
attractions of Victoria and Vancouver 
Island as a tourist and health resort, is to 
be congratulated upon this splendid effort in 
a most praiseworthy cause. The many 
unsurpassed attractions offered by Victoria 
to the summer holiday seeker are presented 
in a manner which reflects credit upon those 
who have the work in charge. 

Many handsome photographs admirably 
display the picturesqueness of scenery, and 
the beauty of places of interest, and go far 
to substantiate the claim that the combina- 
tion of bold and picturesque country with 
old-fashioned English homes, their beautiful 
gardens and air of comfort and content- 
ment, makes Victoria a delightful residential 
city. 

The general attractiveness of Victoria as 
the ideal place for salmon and trout fishing, 
for rifle and shotgun, for excursions and 
drives, for recreation, together with the 
excellent railway and steamship connections, 
is given due prominence. Throughout the 
booklet we are reminded that in Victoria 
there are "no mosquitoes," " no malaria," 
'* no fogs." The Tourist Association have 
a Bureau of Information at 34 Fort street, 
Victoria, B.C. 

CATALOGUE OF MOWERS AND HAKVESTERS. 

"The Harvest Seasons, Deeiing Ideals," 
is the name of an exceedingly handsome 
catalogue of binders, mowers and harvest 
ers, published by The Deering Harvester 
Co. The book contains a comprehensive 
survey of the improvements made from the 
era of the Marsh Elevator Harvester, 1858, 
up to the present time. The cuts of 
numerous medals and awards are produced, 
and as well each portion of their binder 
receives a prominence from the neat cut 
handsomely executed. 

Among the machines whose excellences 
receive due attention are the Deering header 
and binder, the Deering header, the Deer- 
M ing " Ideal " mower, the Deering " Giant 
Ideal" mower, the Deering " Ideal " one- 
horse mower. Reapers and hay rakes and 
corn binders, huskers and shredders, binder 
twine, knife grinders, cultivators and seed- 
ing machinery are all shown with new and 
original points specially emphasized. The 
catalogue contains some very readable 
matter of interest to the farming community 
in the shape of articles and treatises on 
' ' Improved Wheat — a result of experimental 



and scientific crossing of Varieties," on 
"Macaroni Wheat," on the "Rice In- 
dustry," and "Corn Culture." 

An especially noteworthy feature is the 
detailed information given about the Hes- 
sian fly, the chinch bug. Some valuable 
hints are given to the farmer to protect the 
birds who render a wonderful aid by killing 
destructive worms and bugs. 

A DISPLAY CARD. 

The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, 
Toronto, has just issued to the trade 
another suitable display card for the Oxford 
Economy gas range. Its special merits are 
prominently emphasized. A neat cut clearly 
shows the peculiar excellences and uses of 



each section of this "up-to-the-minute" 
range. 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

The celebrated National Cutlery Com- 
pany's tinners' snips, for which Decatur, 
Bull & Co. are agents, are forged from one 
piece of steel, and a shear steel plate of 
special quality welded on the entire cutting, 
edge and face, making their tinners' snips 
the only steel ride snips on the market. 
Hardened in water, and tempered by a 
patented method, they make a tinners' snip 
of excellent quality. Made for right or left 
hand. Ask for catalogue. See their patent 
wire-cutting tinners' snips, put up in separ- 
ate packets each pair. 



THE LONDON SCALE WORKS 

GEORGE M. FOX 

(Successor to John Fox ) 

Manufacturer of Railroad, tlay and 
Platform Scales. 

91 York Street, LONDON, ONT. 



For Sale 

The stock-in-trade, business and 
good-will of the hardware and gro- 
cery store carried on in the village of 
Colborne by the late Wm. Coxall. 

The terms of sale and stock lists, 
etc., may be obtained from the 

NATIONAL TRUST CO., 

22 King St. East, 
Administrator. TORONTO. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 



Paints 



We manufac.ure 
these brands : — 
JON." "PEERLESS," "OWL," 
"RAVEN." also Ready-mixed 
House and Floor 
Paints, Roof, Barn, 
Bridge and Brick 
Paints, Coach Colors. 
Varnishes, Japans, 
etis. Our prices w ill in- 
terest you. Write us, 
The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont. 




Theftsskisi 
Washer 



WARRANTED 

to do the family 
washing 100 PIECES 
IK t HOUR. Noneed 
fur wash board ; no wear on 
clothing. Write for spe- 
cial prices and description. 
ROCKER WASHER CO. 

UUtlW St., rt.Majn«, ln<S. 



YQft^v.STT QhgfrYSr'JS* 

" "N~ Dr. 

OCJtMJ 




200000 

usfc. 



Liberal inducements to lire ageatt. 



It Is Hardware s We Have It 



1 



J)EAIU QUICK AOJUSTFNG cnE4p ENO U<j|1 

BOOT& SHOt FOR ANYBODY 

9LDE.K 




ALL METAL 



NO WOOD 
PARTS 



NICKLE-PLATED 

HIGHLY FINISHED 

SIMPLE, NEAT 

DURABLE 



PAT JULV Ii!.l902. 



For Sale by- 



THE CANADA HARDWARE CO., Limited 



MONTREAL. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LIVERPOOL TIMBER TRADE. 

IN their wood circular, Liverpool, July i , 
1902, Farnworth & Jardine report 
arrivals from British North America 
for the month then past as 14,877 tons 
register, against 29,812 tons register during 
the corresponding month last year, and the 
aggregate tonnage to that date from all 
places during the years 1900, 1901, 1902, 
has been 172,988, 169.224 and 172,991 
tons respectively. 

The cessation of hostilities in South Africa 
has not, so far, created any change in this 
business, but there has been a quiet, steady 
trade throughout the month. The arrivals 
have been on the moderate side, and 
although a short month, on account of the 
Coronation holidays, the deliveries have 
been satisfactory. Stocks, with few excep- 
tions, are not too large, and values gener- 
ally steady. 

Among Canadian woods, in pine timber, 
the first direct shipment of waney (chiefly 
on contract), has arrived and goes largely 
into consumption. Values rule high, and 
stocks are very light. In square pine, 
deck wood, also on contract, has been 
imported more freely, and has gone mostly 
into consumers' hands. Stocks are fairly 
moderate and values unchanged. The 
import of red pine consists of about 5,000 
cubic ft. fresh wood. The demand is quiet 
and stocks appear sufficient for present 
requirements. Prices are steady. The 
arrivals of oak have been moderate, chiefly 
first-class wood for special requirements. 
Deliveries have not been large, but stocks 
are light and values very firm. There has 
recently been more inquiry for later delivery. 
Elm has been imported more freely, and, 
consisting generally of fresh rock elm, the 
deliveries have been fairly satisfactory. 
Stocks are moderate and prices steady, but 
soft elm is practically unsaleable. Ash is 
only in limited demand and stocks are 
sufficient. The imports of Quebec pine 
deals have been large and the deliveries 
show considerable improvement, but stocks 
all around are heavy. Values are un- 
changed. Red pine deals are dull of sales 
and stocks ample. 

In New Brunswick and Nova Scotian 
spiuce and pine deals the import of 10,000 
standards, although exceeding the previous 
month, is slightly less than that of the 
corresponding month last season ; the 
deliveries have fairly kept pace and stocks 
are still moderate; values have ruled steady. 
Pine deals are in fair request ; the stock is 
light and prices unchanged. 

Of birch logs, the arrivals have been 
chiefly from Quebec ; there has been fair 
inquiry at firm rates, and stocks are moder- 
ate. The imports of planks show a marked 



falling off, but the deliveries have been 
very disappointing, and the stock is too 
large. There is little change in value to 
report. 

The arrivals of pitch pine during the past 
month have been five vessels, 3,071 tons 
register, against 14 vessels, 11,973 tons 
register, during the corresponding period 
last year. In hewn, the import has been 
small, and there has been a fair consump • 
tion, but stocks are still ample and values 
low. In sawn, the stock, though consider- 
ably reduced, is sufficient, and, though the 
import has been light, prices show very 
little improvement. Deals and boards are 
still coming forward too freely for the 
requirements of the trade. The consumption 
has been small, and stocks are much too 
heavy. 

There has been no import of British 
Columbian and Oregon pine, but the 
deliveries from recent arrivals have been 
fairly satisfactory at steady prices. The 
stock is not too large. 

Sequoia is in good demand. There is 
no stock. 



PAINT PEOPLE PICNIC. 

The annual picnic of the employes of the 
Canada Paint Co. takes place to-day 
(Saturday, July 26) at St. Hilaire. In 
consequence, all the works, warehouses and 
office are closed up. The party are spend- 
ing the day at the Beloeil Mountain and 
Ottertown Park, near St. Hilaire. 



A SUMMER-TIME STOVE. 

A wonderful contrivance which turns air 
of a temperature of 100 degrees in an 
instant to a temperature which is below the 
freezing point, and operated by no power 
save the air itself, stands in a room at the 
headquarteis of the United States Weather 
Bureau in Washington, writes A. E. John- 
son, in Everybody's Magazine. The 
inventor, Willis L Moore, Chief of the 
Weather Bureau, is glad to allow anybody 
that calls to look at it and feel the delicious 
cool air it gives off. In a few weeks more 
the foreign patents that are now pending 
will have been secured and the public will 
be welcome to examine the interior as well 
as the exterior of the machine that promises 
to become a factor of no mean importance 
in furnishing not only comfort to humanity 
in general, but aid to the manufacturing 
world where room temperature is an item in 
the protection of goods. The gravity 
cooler not only puts cool air into a room, 
but makes it pure and dry. A dust storm 
may be raging outside and the particles be 
laken in through the receiving pipe, but the 
air will come forth perfectly pure. Actual 
experiments have proved time and again 
that the air comes out drier than it goes in. 



A CLEVER INVENTION. 

The " Ideal " boot and shoe polishing 
rest, which The Canada Hardware Co. have 
brought out this week, is the invention of a 
young Canadian, who, to judge by the 
merits which this, his first invention, 
possesses, may be heard of at some future 
time. The contrivance is intended to fasten 
to the wall or any upright plane. It can be 
adjusted to fit any sized boot or shoe, and is 
adjustable to either ladies' shoes or men's 
boots. It's strong, being made entirely of 
iron, and is finished in dull nickel. This 
is one of the best of its kind on the market, 
and, although only out a few days, has 
made remarkable progress in the city of 
Montreal. The trade should inquire for it. 



CHANGE IN HARDWARE FIRM. 

The firm of Squire, Watson & Co., hard- 
ware manufacturers' agents, Montreal, has 
been dissolved, and the following notice has 
been sent out by the successors : 

" We beg to advise our friends and the 
trade in general that the firm of Squire, 
Watson & Co. has this day been dissolved 
by mutual consent. Mr. E. K. Watson 
will continue the business in its entirety, 
under the firm name of E. K. Watson & 
Co., he having assumed the liabilities of 
the old firm and to whom all accounts due 
the old firm are payable. The new firm 
retains all the agencies of the old firm and 
takes this opportunity of thanking the trade 
for their liberal support in the past — and 
will do all in its power to merit a continu- 
ance of the same. We place our personal 
services at your disposition." 

The new firm will have the confidence 
and good wishes of a large section of the 
hardware trade. 



A NEW AGENCY. 

The Canada Hardware Co. have recently 
been appointed agents for the "Jewel" 
mixed paints, manufactured by Wadsworth, 
Howland & Co., Chicago. These paints 
are well known throughout the United States, 
and The Canada Hardware Co.are fortunate 
in being appointed Canadian agents. 

NAILS 

Right Prices 

QtiicK Shipments 

Quality Guaranteed 

Also 

STAPLES 

Write, Telegraph or Telephone 

Page Wire Fence Co. 

Limited 

WalRerville, Ontario 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



Our stock of goods for the spring trade is 
now complete, and we can fill all orders promptly 
on the following lines : 

Wire, IS ails, Cordage, Window 
Glass, White Lead, Paints, Whit- 
ing, Churns, Linseed Oil, Spades 
and Shovels, Screen Doors, Wove 
Wire, Poultry Netting, Builders' 
Hardware, Guns and Sporting 
Goods. Finest stock in the 
Province of Cutlery. 

Prompt Shipment. Prices Right. 



DOMINION 

Wire Manufacturing Company, Limited 



Head Office 
MONTREAL 

Que. 



^J^sS^N, \ Branch Office 

ORONT 

Ont. 




Annealed, 

Oiled and Annealed, 

Bright, 

Bright Spring, 

Coppered, 

Coppered Spring, 

Brass, Brass Spring, 

Copper, Tinned and 

Galvanized WIRES. 



Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws. 
Jack Chain. 
Cotter Pins. 
Bright Wire Goods. 
Door Pulls. 
" Crescent " 
Coat and Hat Hooks 
Tinned Bottling 
Wires. 



Fence, Poultry Netting, Bed and Blind Staples. 

COPPER AND GALVANIZED WIRE 

For Telegraph and Telephone Lines. 



The GLOBE Metal Polish 



The Best in the World. 
Makes - Metals - Mirrors. 



RAIIVIEIS & GO. 



164 Duane St. 



NEW YORK. 



RICHARD JOHNSON, CLAPHAM & MORRIS, Ld, Manchester 



Cable Address — "Metallicus," Manchester. 
CoDhs Used— ABC, AI, Liebers 
and Private Code. 

Manufacturers and 

GALV'D SHEETS 
GALV'D CANADAS 
BLACK SHEET IRON 
BLACK CANADAS 
Range & Furnace SHEETS 

MONTREAL OFFICE : 

Messrs. Copland & Co., 
Imperial Buildings. 




WAREHOUSE LEVER STREET 



and LIVERPOOL, ENG. 

Metal Merchants 

TINPLATES, TERNES 
TINNED SHEETS 
PIG TIN, PIG LEAD 
WIRE NETTING 
GALV'D BARB WIRE 



HALIFAX OFFICE: 

Messrs. Grant, Oxley & Co., 
68 Bedford Row. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July 25, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

Bl SINESS, in general, has not been 
as good as last week' ; but, in 
spile di everything, jobbers and 
manufacturers report an active demand 
for all seasonable lines. A continuance 
of the present disagreeable weather may 
bave a bad effect on the hardware trade 
later on. but. so far, from the whole- 
salers' point of view, tin- trade has been 
comparatively little affected. In the re- 
tail business, however, the movement in 
such lines as paints and oils and building 
materials has slowed down somewhat, 
and will continue until the prolonged 
spell of wet weather is over. Prices have 
been fairlv steady throughout the week. 
Barn door tracks have been one of the ex- 
ceptions, and are now up to $3.90 per Kill 
feet. Galvanized clothesline wire has 
also advanced, being now quoted at $2.50 
for No. 19. Snider ball cartridges are 
hard to procure, most of the jobbers hav- 
ing sold out those that the Government 
disposed of some time ae'o- It will In' 
impossible to obtain any more when this 
supply is exhausted, and only the shot 
cartridge can be supplied. Axes are com- 
mencing to move for the fall trade, and 
the demand is growing for horse blank- 



ets and halters, sleigh bells, skates, etc. 
Skates and bells will both be somewhat 
lower in price for the coming fall ami 
winter seasons. In bells, a few lines are 
otl'e.ed at lower prices, which, however, 
are of inferior grade to those of last 
year. 

SCYTHES.— The movement in scythes 
is not as brisk this week as it was last 
week. There is. however, still a fairly 
active market at unchanged prices. We 
now quote : Lance. No. 80, $5.50 ; Hurd's 
Clipper, ;j(5.50 ; concave, $7.50 ; Sibley, 
SS.50 ; Cradle scythes, cast steel, $8.50 ; 
silver steel, $9.50 ; " Harvest King,'" 
§10.50. Bush scythes, $fi.50. 

BARB WIRE.— A few lots have been 
soltl this week, but the demand is irregu- 
lar, and the volume of business is not 
great. Thi' price, f.o.b., Montreal, is $3 
per 1(1(1 It), keg. 

GALVANIZED W1BE— Trade is still 
(piiet in this line at unchanged prices all 
round. Our quotations are as follows : 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45 ; No. 0, 
$2.S0 ; No. 10, $3.55; No. II, $3.(55; No. 
12. $2.95 ; No. 13, $3.05 ; No. 14, $4.05 ; 
No. 15, $1.55 ; No. Ifi, $4.80 ; No. 17, 
85.20 ; No. 18, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— No import- 
ant change has occurred in this market, 
which is quiet anil steady at the prices 
here quoted : Bright and annealed. 
•S-i.nO per 100 lb. f. o. b. Mont 



real, Toronto, Halifax, London, Hamil- 
ton and St. John. Net extras per 100 tb.#; 
are as follows : Coppered wire, 60c; tin- 
ned wire, $2 ; oiling, 10c; spring wire, 
$1.25 ; best steel wire, 75c; bright soft 
drawn, 15c; special hay-baling wire, 30c 

FINE WIRE.— There is nothing new to 
report in this market. Trade continues 
quiet, and the discount is 22.V per cent. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.— Like 
other wires, these are not in very active 
demand. The market remains quiet, and 
the discount is 60 per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES.— Only a small 
amount of business has been effected this 
week. No quotable change is to be re- 
ported, and galvanized still sell at 13.25 
per 100-tb. keg; bright $2.90 per L00-tb. 
Lee-, with an extra of 25c. charged for 
25 and 50-lb. packages. 

WIRE NAILS.— The demand for wire 

nails, which has 1 n fairly satisfactory. 

keeps up well. Prices are unchanced. In 
small lots, the price is $2.55 and in car- 
lots, 82.5(1 f.o.b. Montreal, London, Ham- 
ilton, Toronto. Gananoque, Brantford, 
Windsor, Ont., St. John and Halifax. 

CUT NAILS.— There is a moderate in- 
quiry for cut nails. The price remains at 
S2.-I5 per kee-. in small lots, and $2.37 ^ 
per keg in carlo ts. 

HORSE NAILS. Trade in this line is 
showing signs of improvement, the de- 



Preserving Season Requirements 



Have you examined your stock of Preserving Utensils lately ? 

It would be unfortunate to run out of any of these lines just at present. 

We can make prompt shipment of any orders (large or small) for these goods. 




Lipped Preserving Kettles 

Made in 12 Sizes, in 'Famous" 
and "Imperial" Enamel Ware. 



Fruit Funnels . . . 



Tin and Enamelled. 



Fruit Strainers 

WITH MASHERS. 

HAVE WIRE HANDLES. 




ho IVIcOlary Manufacturing Co., 



LONDON, TORONTO. 



MONTREAL. WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

Ivory-thing -for -tr»© Tinshop" 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



ENGLISH 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 

FIRE 

BUILDING 

ENAMELLED 

•SILICA 
MAGNESIA 

DRAIN 
CULVERT 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



BRICKS. 



} PIPES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEMffif? 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

"IE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is r> quired ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



ft 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND 



.Foundry Pig Iron, 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land* ' will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prices to Sales Ageets 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

er te MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. 



mancl for fall business having now com- 
menced. The discount <>n " New Coun- 
tersunk " heads has been changed lo 70 
per cent., instead of 66 2-3 per cent. We 
quote : " C " brand, 50 and 7^ per cent, 
oil ; " M " brand, for " Oval " and "New 
City " heads, 60 per cent, off, and for 
" New Countersunk " heads. 70 per 
cent. off. "Monarch" horse nails are also 
discounted at 66 2-3 per cent. 

HORSESHOES— Trade is picking U p 
rapidly for fall. Some cutting is report- 
ed among jobbers, No. 2 and larger iron 
shoes being sold at $3.15, XL steel 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, at $3.25, 
and No. 2 and larger snow shoes, at 
&3.40. The shoes thus sold, however, are 
said by some jobbers to have been culls. 
We ( i note : Iron shoes, light and medium 
pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.35 : No. 1 
and smaller. $3.60 ; snow pattern, No. 2 
and larger, $3.60 ; No. I and smaller, 
$3.85 : X L steel shoes, new light pat- 
tern, sizes I to 5, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.45 ; No. I and smaller. $3.70 ; feather- 
weight, all sizes, (I to I. $5; toe weight, 
all sizes. I to 1. $6.25. Shoes, more than 
one size in a keg, 10c. per keg extra. 
F.o.b. Montreal only. 

SCREWS— Some falling off in the de- 
mand is reported, but it is expected to 
pick up aoain shortly. The market is 
still fairly active. The discounts are : 
Round head bright, 82^ and 10 per cent.: 
flat head bright, 87^- and 10 per cent.; 
brass, round heads, 75 and 10 per cent.; 
brass, flat heads, 80 and 10 per cent. 

CORDAGE. — Trade continues quiet, and 
prices have not changed since our last 
report. We quote : Manila, 15c; British 
manila, 13c; sisal, 12^c; lathyarn, lie. 
Prices on binder twine are as follows : 
Blue Ribbon, 650 feet to the pound, 15c; 
Redcat, 600 feet to the pound, 14c. ; 
Tiger, 550 feet to the pound, 13c. ; 
Standard, 500 feet to the pound, ll^c: 
sisal, 500 feet to the pound, ll^c Prices 
are subject to a rebate of £c in carload 
lots. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— This market 
has improved considerably during the 
past week, and jobbers all report a good 
business. No change in prices has been 
made. The discounts are as follows : 
Best iron rivets, section carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 
and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
with the usual proportion of burrs, 45 
per cent, off, and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5-fb. carton boxes, are 
quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, off list. 

BOLTS. — There is nothing new to re- 
port in this line. Both bolts and nuts 
are in fairly good demand. Discounts are 
as follows : Norway carriage bolts. 55 per 
cent.; common, 50 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 55 per cent.; machine 
bolts, 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws. 
66 2-3 per cent.; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 and 
5 per cent.; blank bolts, 50 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 50 and 5 per cent.; 
plough bolts, 50 and 5 per cent. To any 
retailer an extra discount of 10 per cent, 
is allowed. Tire bolts, 67£ per cent. ; 
stove bolts, 674; per cent. Nuts, square, 
3^ per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 3fc 
per lb. off list. To all retailers an extra 
discount of 4c per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER.— There is still a 
good movement, and the market is active 
and steady all round. No ((notable 
change has been made. We now quote : 
Tarred felt, $1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
ready roofing, 85c per roll ; 3- ply, $1.10 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

Agents- for 

Henry Wright & Cos 

ANVILS and VISES. 

Standard Chain Co's 

COIL CHAIN. 

SANDERSON'S STEEL IN STOCK. 



509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 

"Standard 
Pumps." 

That's wl at McDougall 
Pumps are. 

They are the best made. 

QUALITY the best and 
PRICE is RIGHT too. 

You make no mistake in 
selling McDougall . . 
Pumps, because they last 
a long time and satisfy 
your customers. 

Better write to-day for 
our catalogue and price 
list. 

THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited, 

GALT, ONT. 



Pig Iron 

We offer to arrive : 

No. i Eglinton 
No. i Middlesbro' 
No. 3 




ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton. Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., um« 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturer* o f 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTI* 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



\ Good Thing 

when once tried is sure to make a strong 
appeal to your customers and meet with corre- 
sponding appreciation. 

This is demonstrated by the increasing 
demand for 

Elastilite Varnish, 
Chijap Floor Lac, 
Maple Leaf Varnish Stain 
and Coach Enamels. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



The 



Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



LIMITED 



Toronto, Ont., Canada. 



Canadian Agents for Buehne's "Red, White and Blue" Brand Steel Wool. 



Don't tell a customer you are out of "Ark Brand" 



Paint. 



See to it that you always have a supply. 

Do not wait for our travellers if you find yourself 
running short of 

"Ark Brand" 
Paint 



but write to us mentioning our traveller's name. 

You have our color cards— if not, we will send 
them on application — and you will have your orders by 
mail filled promptly. 

Write today and arrange for the agency for your 



town. 



i*" 



FRANCIS-FROST C\. 



imited 



TORONTO. 
Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 






per roll ; carpet felt, §2.25 per 100 lb.; 
dry sheathing-, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll; 
tarred fibre, 60c. per roll ; K and I X 
L, 65c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, 
§30 per ton ; slaters' felt, GOc. per roll. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH.— Trade has 
been very quiet this week. The price is 
SI. 37 !, per 100 square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING.— The demand is 
very light, but prices are kept up and 
Canadian or English netting is discount- 
ed as Follows: 2x2 mesh, 19 wire, 50 
and 10 per cent. ; 2 x 2 mesh, heavier 
wire, 50 per cent. Canadian list used. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— There has been a 
materia] decrease in sales this week, and 
i he market is becoming quieter. The dis- 
count remains at (50 per cent. 

FIREBRICKS. In this line business 
Continues about, as usual. The market 
is still quiet. We quote: English bricks, 
$16 to 822 per 1,000, and Scotch, $17 to 
§22 per 1,000. 

CEMENT.— No change in this market 
has occurred, whatever. Trade is fair. 
We quote as follows: Canadian cement, 
$1.90 to §2.25; German, $2.20 to $2.30; 
English, $2.15 to §2.25; Belgian, 81.70 
to 81.95 per bbl. ex-wharf, and Amer- 
ican. $2.10 to $2.20 ex-cars. 

MLTALS. 

The iron and steel markets continue 
active and firm. Furnaces, hampered 
considerably by the scarcity of fuel must, 
however, work to their utmost capacity 
Lo tupply the demand. There is a great 
demand for all structural material, as 
well as for all forms of railroad supplies . 
SO much so, that even with the orders on 



hand now, manufacturers will be busy for 
the greater part of 1903. Jobbers are 
short on some lines of goods, such as 
Canada plates and black sheets, and un- 
til further shipments arrive these goods 
will be very scarce on the local market. 
It has not yet been determined to what 
extent the cargo of the wrecked steamer 
Monteagle has been damaged, but from 
the appearance of the goods alreadj 
taken out of the hold, including tinplate, 
sheet iron, etc., the damage will be con- 
siderable. 

PIG IRON.— This is as firm as ever, 

and although every possible facility is 
made use of, the furnaces are frequently 
unable to fill contracts on time. Can- 
adian pig iron is quoted at $18.50 to 
$19; Summerlee, $21.50 to $22. 

BAR IKON. Trade in bar iron contin- 
ues fairly good. Merchants' bar is quot- 
ed at $2 and horseshoe iron, at $2.20. 

BLACK SHEETS-.— There is some 
shortage on this market, jobbers not 
having received the expected supplies. 
We quote as follows : 28 gauge, $2.65 ; 
2(1 gauge, $2.60 ; 20 to 24 gauge, $2.50. 
and 8 to 20 gauge, $2.50. 

OAI.Y USLIZED [RON.— There is a fairly 
active marke! this week. \o change in 
prices is reported, and our quotations 

are now as follows : No. 2.S, Queen's 
Head, $4.40; Apollo, I0« oz., $4.40; 
Fleur do Lis, $1.15 ; Comet, $4.25 ; "Bell" 
brand, $4.30. For less than ease lots 
Hie. extra is charged. 
tNGOT COPPER. There is no change. 

Trade is quiet . We quote I lc\ 

[NGOT TIN. There is only a fair de 
maud. The price of Straits is 33 .'c. 



-The market for 
and unchanged. 



pig lead 

The price 



PIG LEAD. 

remains quiet 
is $3.25. 

LEAD PIPE.— A small amount of bus, 
ness is doing- a t 8c. for composition and 
waste, and 7c. for ordinary. The dis- 
count is 37i per cent. 

IRON PIPE.— There is a fairly good 
demand this week. We quote : Standard 
pipe per 100 feet, in lengths under P.I 
feet : Black, J, $2. Id ; g, $2.65 ; .', . $2.85 ■ 
h $3.65; 1-in., $5.20: 1[. $7.35; I.',. 
$8.95; 2 in., $12.55. Galvanized, k, $3.2U: 
|, $3.45; i. $3.85; f„ $5; Lin.. $7.20 : 
li, $10.05; 1^, $12.20; 2 in., $16.85. 
Extra heavy pipe, plain ends, are quoted 
per Hill feet as follows 
V. $5.25; Lin., $7.55 
$12.75; 2-in.. 817.60. 
$5.20 : ■'. $6.65 : Lin., i 
U, -SHI : 2-in., $21.90. 



couplings 5 per 

TINPLATES.- 
well. The price 
$5.25 per box. 
box. 



Black. .',. $4.35 
I ',. $10.55 ; L.. 
Galvanized, .'. . 
$9.55 : I !. $13.25 ; 

Lor threads and 

cent, is added. 

These are moving out 
of charcoals is $4.75 lo 
and of cokes, $1.25 per 



CANADA PLATES. -These are bee, in 
big scarce on the local market. The in L 
quiry keeps up. Quotations follow ; 52's. 
$2.70 to $2.80 ; (Hi's, $2.85 to $2.90 ■ 75's. 
$2.80 to $2.85 ; full polished, $3.75, and 
galvanized, $4.25 to $4.35 ; galvanized, 
mi's. $1,15 to $4.55. 

STEEL. There is no change to report 
and the market is rather quiet. We quote: 

Sleigbshoe, $2.10; tire, $2.20; bar. $2.95; 
spring-, $2.85 : reeled machinery, $2.75 ; 
toecalk. 82.70. 

SHEET STEEL. Business is slow this 
week. Our quotations are as follows: 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



Nos. 10 to 20, $2.50 ; 3-16, $2.50 ; \. 
5-10, and f, $2.40. 

TOOL STEEL— The demand for tool 
steel has not improved, and the market 
is still quiet. Prices are unchanged. 
Our quotations are as follows : Black 
Diamond, 8c; Sanderson's, 8 to 12c, 
according to grade ; Jessop's, 13c; Leon- 
ard's, 7£c; Jonas & Golver's, 8 to 15c ; 
" Air Hardening," 30 to 50c 
4 TERNE PLATES.— There is very little 
demand for terne plates. The price is 
$7.50. 

COIL CHAIN.— This is going fairly 
well. No quotable change is reported. We 
quote : No. 6, 12£c. ; No. 5, lOfc; No. 4, 
10c; No. 3, 9*c; £-inch, 7±c. per ft.; 
5-16, $5 ; 5-16 exact, $5.25 ; §, $4.25 ; 
7-16, $4.05 ; £, $3.95 ; 9-16, $3.85 ; |, 
$3.55 ; |, $3.50 ; &, $3.45 ; 1-inch, $3.45. 
In carload lots an allowance of 10c. is 
made. 

SHEET ZINC— There is no material 
change in this market, which is quiet 
and steady at $5.85 to $6.25. 

ANTIMONY.— The demand for antimony 
has shown no improvement whatever, and 
trade remains dull at 10c 

ZINC SPELTER.— There is no change. 
The price remains at 5c, with little 
doing. 

SOLDER.— This moves out steadily. No 
quotable change is to be reported. The 
price of bar solder is 18c and of wire 
solder, 20c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Both linseed oil and turpentine have 
taken further declines, the former being 
now quoted 3c below last week's price 
and the latter, 2c. below it. The cause 
of the drop was the increased supplies on 
the market. Arrivals have been frequent, 
and although the demand is still good, 
the market is much easier. Back orders 
are being filled, and at the reduced prices 
an increased demand has sprung up. The 
irritation and worry, which was the re- 
sult of the short receipts, has now disap- 
peared, and business in these two lines 
runs along much more smoothly. The 
demand for white lead keeps up well, and 
already some large orders for putty have 
been booked for August and September 
shipment. No change is reported in the 
price of other lines, and, in a general 
way, business may be considered satisfac- 
tory. We quote : 

WHITE LEAD.-Best brands, Govern- 
ment standard, $5.87£ ; No. 1, $5.50 ; 
No. 2, $5.12^; No. 3, $4.75; No. 4, 
$4,374 all f.o.b. Montreal. 

DRY WHITE LEAD.— $5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC. -Pure dry, in 
casks, 6J;c; in 100-ft. kegs, 6fc. No. 1 
zinc, in casks, 5£c; in 100-ft. kegs, 5|c 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25-ft. irons, 8c; No. 1, 7c; No.2, 6c. 

PUTTY .--We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
$1.90 per 100 ft.; bulk, in less quantitv, 
|2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200-ft. kegs or boxes, 
$2.40 ; in tins, $2.55 to $2.65 ; in less 
than 100-ft. lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. higher, 
f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL.— Casks, 7c; 100- 
ft. kegs, 7|c; smaller quantities, 8£c 

RED LEAD. — Genuine red lead, in casks, 
$4.50 ; in 100-ft. kegs, $4.75 ; in less 
quantities, $5.75 per 100 ft. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 



IMPROVED BUILDING MATERIALS. 

X 



♦ 

x 

x 

t 



All the newest and most effective ideas are embodied in our 
metallic goods. 

The points that make for convenience in handling — for long dura- 
tion — for most efficient service. 

The points that make fully satisfied customers. Isn't it to your own 
interest to sell the goods that never require an after apology or ex- 
planation ? Consult our catalogue for full information about our metallic 

CEILINGS, CORNICES, LATHING, 

SHINGLES, SKY LIGHTS, CORRUGATED IRON, 

SIDINGS, VENTILATORS, FINIALS. 

And other goods for all kinds of architectural purposes. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited, 

Wholesale Manufacturers, 
TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



♦ 

X 

♦ 



LITHARGE.— Ground, casks, 5c. ; less 
quantities, 5^c; flake litharge, casks, 
$5.25 ; smalls, $5.75 per 100 ft. 

LINSEED OIL.— Kaw, 77c; boiled, 80c. 
In 5 to 9 bbls., lc less. Terms, net cash 
in 30 days. Delivered in Ontario, be- 
tween Montreal and Oshawa, at 2c per 
gal . advance. 

TURPENTINE.— Single barrels, 68c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 67c. Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 

SHELLAC VARNISH.-Pure white, 
$2.35 to $2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS.— $1.20 to $1.45 per 
gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— 8f to 9£c. in wholesale 
lots, and \q. additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL.— 48 to 50c 

COD OIL— 35 to 37£c. 

PARIS GREEN.— Petroleum, bbls., 
16fc per ft.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 
100-ft. drums, 17£c; 25-ft. drums, 18c; 
1-ft. packages, 18£c; -£-ft. packages, 
204c; 1-ft. tins, 19£c; £-ft. tins, 21£c 
f.o.h. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of de- 
livery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

There has been no important change in 
the market for scrap materials. Metals 
are very quiet all round. We quote as fol- 
lows : Heavy copper and wire, lO^c per 
ft.; light copper, 8c; heavy red brass, 
lO^c; heavy yellow, 9c; light brass, 5c; 
lead, 2 to 2£c; zinc, 2£c; iron No. 1 , 
wrought, $15 ; No. 2, $7 per tori ; ma- 
chinery scrap, $16 ; stove plate, $12 ; 
malleable and steel, $5 ; mixed country 
rags, 60 to 70c. per 100 ft. ; old rubbers, 
6 to 6£c per ft. 

GLASS. 

This continues quiet and featureless. 
We now quote: First break, 50 ft., $2.10 ; 
second, $2.20 for 50 feet ; first break, 100 
feet, $4 ; second break, $4.20 ; third 
break, $4.70 ; fourth break, $4.95. 

HIDES. 

There has been no change in the mar- 
ket. Prices are fairly steady all round. 
We quote as follows : No. 1 hides, 10c; 



No. 2, 9c; No. 3, 8c Calfskins, 12c ; 
lambskins, 30c 

MARKET NOTES. 

Linseed oil is 3c lower. 

Turpentine has declined 2c 

Galvanized clothesline wire has been 
advanced to $2.50 for No. 19. 

Barn door tracks have advanced, and 
are now quoted at $3.90 per 100 feet. 

The discount on . " M " brand horse 
nails, " New Countersunk " heads, is now 
70 per cent, instead of 66 2-3 per cent, 
off. 

ONTARIO MARKETS 

Toronto, July 25, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

TRADE in hardware, which is prin- 
cipally of a sorting-up nature, 
continues to be well sustained. 
Mail orders now are quite numerous, as 
the travellers are either on their vaca- 
tion, or renewing their samples. A good 
many small orders for barb wire are 
being received for immediate shipment 
from Toronto. There is also a large de- 
mand for rope and hay forks. Sporting 
goods and ammunition continue quite 
active. Jobbers are evidently laying in 
a large stock of guns for the sporting 
season, which begins in about a month's 
time. Quite a large business is reported 
in poultry netting for delivery next year, 
and a shortage in ranges and stoves is 
anticipated this fall. There have been 
no changes in any line during the week. 

BARB WIRE.— Quite a number of small 
orders are being received in this line, 
which have to be shipped promptly from 
stocks jobbers have on hand in Toronto, 
as it takes too long for orders to be 
shipped from the factories at Cleveland. 
The prices are unchanged. We quote : 
Barb wire, in carlots, $2.65 and for less 
than carlots, $2.77^ f.o.b. Cleveland. 
From stock, Toronto, $3. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— A fair business 
of a sorting-up nature is reported in gal- 
vanized wire, which remains unchanged. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Quotations are as follows : Nos. 6, 7 
and 8, $3.50 to §3. bo per 101) ib., accord- 
ing to quantity; No. 9, §2.85 to $3.15; 
No. 10, $3.60 to $3.95; No. II, $3.70 to 
$4.10 ; No. 12, $3 to $3.30 ; No. 13, $3.10 
to $3.40 ; No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50 ; No. 15, 
$4.C0 to $5.50 ; No. 16, $4.85 to $5.35. 
Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. Cleveland are 
quoted at $2.52£ in less than carlots and 
12c. less for carlots of 15 tons. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— Trade in this 
line is of a light sorting-up nature. We 
quote the base price : $2.60 per 100 
lb. Oiling, 10c; coppering, 60c, and tin- 
ning, $2 per 100 lb. extra. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Mont- 
real, with freights equalized on those 
points. 

FINK STEEL WIRE— Business in this 
line continues fair. The discount is 22\ 
per cent. 

WIRE NAILS.— A good demand for 
ihese (.'01111111168, with stocks in the hands 
of the jobbers light. We quote $2.55 for 
less than carlots and $2.50 for carlots. 
The delivery points are Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, London. (Jananoque and Montreal. 

CUT NAILS.— Business in cut nails is 
of a moderate nature, and prices are un- 
changed. We quote: Cut nails, $2.45 
per keg and $2.37£ for carlots. 

HORSE NAILS.— These continue steady 
and unchanged. We quote the discounts 
as follows : " C " brand, oval head, 
50 and 7£ per cent.; on " M " brand, 50, 
10 and 5 per cent.; " Monarch," 60 2-3 
per cent. Countersunk head, 60 per cent. 

HORSESHOES.— These continue in 
moderate demand. We quote as follows : 
iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, $3.60 ; snow shoes, 
$3.85 : light steel shoes, $3.70 ; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.95 ; iron shoes, No. 
1 and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; light 
steel shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4.95. 

SCREWS.— The scarcity in these is un- 
relieved ami the demand is well sustain- 
ed. Discounts are: Flat head bright, 
87£ and 10 per cent.; round head 
blight. 82£ and 10 per cent.; Hat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 65 per cent., and flat head bronze, 
70 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— A good de- 
mand continues [or these, and the stocks 
in the hands of the jobbers are light. The 
discounts are ' Iron rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent.; iron burrs, 55 per cent.; cop- 
per rivets, with usual proportion of 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 
30 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS.— The situation in 
these is about the same as last week. 

There is a heavy demand and a scarcity 
of aizes. We quote: Carriage bolts, 
common ($1.00 list), 50 per cent. ; 
carriage bolts, full square ($2.40 list), 55 
per cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3 list), 55 per cent.; machine bolts, all 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws, 
cone points, 66 2-3 per cent.; elevator 
shaft and whiflletree bolts, 50 per cent. 
SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOW S.- 
A moderate volume of business continues 
in bhese at unchanged prices. We quote 
as follows : Walnut, stained, 3-inch style, 
$6.80 per dozen ; stained, yellow, $7 ; 
natural color, oil finish, $8.15 ; 4-inch 
style, 20c extra per dozen. Windows : 
No. 0, $1.60 ; No. 1, $1.70 ; No. 2, $1.95 ; 
No. 3, $2.10; No. 4, $2.50 per dozen. 



GREEN WIRE CLOTH.— Trade in green 
wire cloth continues fair. We quote 
$1.37^ I"' 1 ' l ,MI square feet. 

SPADES AND SHOVELS.— These are 
in moderate demand, and the discount 
continues unchanged at 40 and 5 per 
cent. 

ROPE. — Business in rope in general is 
good, and there is a brisk call for hay 
fork rope at present. The prices are un- 
changed. We quote : Pure manila, 15c. ; 
British manila, 13c; sisal, 12^c; lathyarn, 
single, lie, double, ll^c; sisal bed cord, 
3-cord, 48 feet, 65c; 60 feet, 80c; 72 feet, 
95c per dozen. 

BINDER TWINE.— A heavy demand is 
being experienced for binder twine at pres- 
ent, but as nearly all of this season's 
make has previously been booked for de- 
livery when required, the supplies now 
available are small, and a shortage in 
binder twine for this season is already 
anticipated. The factories are busy and 
are bare of stock, and the market is 
strong. Quotations are as follows : 
" Blue Ribbon," 650 ft., 15c; " Red 
Cap," 600 ft., 14c; "Tiger," 580 ft., 
13c; sisal, 500 ft., ll^C. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— The demand for 
these is keeping up well at unchanged 
prices. The discount is 60 per cent. 

EAVETROUGH, ETC.— Quite a heavy 
call for eavetroughing is being experi- 
enced this year, and so far the amount 
of business done in this line is in excess 
of that of last year. Our quotations 
are as follows : Eavetrough, $3.10 per 
100 square feet, for 10-inch, and conduc- 
tor pipe at $4 for 3-inch, and $5.25 for 
4-inch. 

BUILDING PAPER— A good demand 
continues for building paper from all 
parts of the country, and we quote as 
follows : Dry sheathing, grey or straw, 
35c per roll ; tar sheathing, grey or 
straw, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per 
roll ; tarred fibre, 60c. per roll. 

LAWN MOWERS— A few small orders 
are still coming in for these. The 
discounts are now as follows : 50 
per cent, on high-wheeled lawn mowers, 
" Star " mowers, 9-in. wheels, $2.25 to 
$3 ; " Daisy " mowers, 7-in. wheels,- 
§2.25 to $2.50. 

HARVEST WHIPS— A number of sort- 
ing-up orders in harvest whips continue 
to be received. 

POULTRY NETTING,— A good busi- 
ness is being done in this line for de- 
livery next year. 

TINWARE AND ENAMELLED WARE. 

A good demand continues for preserv- 
ing kettles, and other lines of enamelled 
ware arc moving freely. Tinware is also 
experiencing a good sorting up demand. 

SPORTING GOODS.— The active de- 
mand noted last week in guns and rifles 
is keeping up, and ammunition is also 
moving 'freely. Retailers seem to be pre 
paring to do a good business as soon as 
the season opens. 

CEMENT.— The tone of the cement mar 
ke1 is stronger this week and the de- 
mand has improved. The stocks in the 
hands of the manufacturers arc small, 
and they find it hard to fill all their 
orders. An inquiry from some sections 
of the United States comes for cement, 
but the makers here have all they can 
do ..i present to attend to the Canadian 
trade. Our quotations are as follows: 
Canadian Portland, $2.25 to $2.85, and 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.35 to $1.60 per 
bbl. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



(( COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS . I 

'S^t-SS ^-^jTl^rgert Variety, I f 

HE** ' *Z** ~^/^/l Toilet, Hand, Electric Power! (9 

-/ARE THE BEST. 4 I 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep -Shearing Machinef. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BSJn> FOB CATALOG UI TO 
AB.rl.u Skear.r Mtg. Co., Huhu, 1C.H..C8A 




V 



The Best Door Closer is . . . 
NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRING 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of 
wind. Has many working advantages over the 
ordinary spring, and has twice the wear. In use 
throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. Gives 
perfect satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 

Hospital St., - - BIRMINGHAM 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



An 
Experience. 

One of the largest 
operators on the 
North Shore after 
one year's experi- 
ence of CROWN 
JEWEL AXES 
in his shanties is 
so satisfied he will 
not consider buy- 
ing any other. 



Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Haldimand, Jr., Montreal Agent. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



• 4** <& 



a* ^ 



** 



Which are being manufactured at our Dominion Works are WARRANTED. Made from selected 
Cast Steel by experienced workmen. We can supply any Shape, Size or Cut in this brand at very 
lowest prices (Quality considered). For sale by the following Wholesale Hardware Merchants : 



Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham & Workman, Montreal. 
Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. 
Aiken head Hardware Co., Limited, Toronto. 



Thos. Birkett & Sons, Ottawa. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London. 

D. H. Howden & Co., London. 

E. Q. Prior & Co., Victoria, B.C. 



John Fennell & Sons, Berlin, Ont. 



WALTER GROSE, 



SELLING 
AGENT, 



Montreal. 



NICHOLSON EILE CO., Port l1o|)e, Ont. 



METALS. 

There has been no marked change in 
the general local trade in metals, and 
business continues good. Prices are 
steady, and those at present prevailing 
are likely to be maintained for some time 
to come. In the United States pig tin 
was reported weak and lower, due to the 
anxiety of a number of holders to sell, 
and as the consuming demand is almost 
wholly lacking, few buyers were found. 
'This caused prices to decline considerably. 
In iron, there continues on the other side 
more or less demand for spot and early 
delivery with next to nothing to meet it. 

PIG IRON.— The local market is strong 
and unchanged. The United States mar- 
ket is, generally, quiet, with very little 
business doing. We quote on track. 
Toronto : No. 1 foundry, $21, and No. 
2, $20\50. 

STEEL BOILER PLATES.-The tone of 
the market for these continues strong 
with an active demand. We quote $1.80 
for carload lots, on track, Toronto. 

STEEL BEAMS.— Trade in steel beams 
is keeping up. Quotations are unchanged 
at $2.75 for steel beams, from stock, and 
$2 per 101) for carload lots on track. 

STEEL RAILS.— These are quoted at 
'830 per ton for steam railway rails, and 
835 per ton for electric railway rails. 

TOOL STEEL.— The local demand for 
tool steel is heavy, and prices are un- 
changed. We now quote ' "BC" and 
" Black Diamond, " 10 to lie; Jessop's, 
Morton's and Firth's, 14c; Jonas & (Jol- 
ver's, 8 to 15c; ditto, " Air Hardening,'' 
30 to 50c; Ghas. Leonard's, 8 to Uc; 
Park's " Silver," 12 to 14c; Park's 
Special, 15 to 20c 

MILD STEEL. — A fair volume of busi- 
ness continues to be done in this line. 

SPRING STEEL.— Trade in spring steel 
continues fair. 

BOILER TUBES.— The market contin- 
ues steady with a good demand. 

BAR IRON.— The local market for bar 
*<>n continues strong and active, with 
a scarcity of stocks. The United States 
markets are strong and quiet, and our 
quotations are as follows : $1.95 to 
$2.05 base. Extras cut to length while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c per 100 lb.; 
1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 
20c; over 20 ft. by special agreement, 
according to length and size. 

BLACK SHEETS.— Business in this 
line continues good. We quote: Common, 
13.15 for 28 gauge, and dead flat, $2.50 
for 26 gauge. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 



THE CELEBRATED 

NATIONAL CUTLERY CO. SHEARS 

Acknowledged the best and fully warranted. 
Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

Tailors' Shears, 

Trimmers, 

Ladies' 

Scissors, 

Barbers' 

Shears, 

Tinners' 

Snips, 




DECATUR, BULL & CO., 



Sales Agents, 

MONTREAL. 



CANADA PLATES.— These continue in 
fair demand at unchanged prices. We 
quote: All dull, $3; half-polished, $3.10. 
and all bright, $3.75. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS.— There is a 
fairly active movement in these. We 
quote in case lots : Queen's Head, |4.50 
for 28 gauge ; American, $4.40 for 20 
gauge ; Bell brand, $4.20 for 28 gauge. 

TIN. — There has been a little improve- 
ment in the local demand for tin. In the 
United States the market is lower and 
easy, owing to some holders of pig tin 
I ecoming anxious to sell. We quote $32 
to $33 | er 100 lb. 

TINPLATES— A fair amount of busi- 
ness is being done in these at unchanged 
prices. We quote : Charcoal, $4.75 to $5 
per box and cokes, $1.25 per box. 

COPPER. — An active business locally is 
doing in copper. The outside markets 
are weak and quiet. We quote : Ingot 
copper, $14 per 100 IT).; sheet copper, $22 
to $23. 

BRASS. — A fair amount of business 
continues to be done in this line. The 
discount is 15 per cent. 

PIG LEAD.— This metal is in bebter 
demand on the local market. We quote 
pig lead, $3.50 to $3.75 and bar, $5. 

IRON PIPE— A good local demand is 
reported for iron pipe. The prices of the 
sizes of iron pipe above 2 inches in 
diameter have been reduced. The price 



of 2^-in. pipe is now $2(1 per net 100 ft., 
instead of $24, and 4 per cent, discount. 
The discount on the smaller sizes is now 
7.V per cent., instead of 4 per cent, as 
heretofore. We quote as follows per 
100 ft.: i-in., $2.40; fin., $2.65; Aim, 
$2.85; fin., $3.65; 1-in., $5.20; lj-ii,., 
$7.35; 14-in., $S.95 ; 2-in., $12.55; gal 
vanized, I -in. , $7.20. Trade discount, ~ h 
1 er cent. 

ZINC SPELTER.— The market for zinc 
s| elter is q/aiet and the prices are un- 
changed. We quote $5 to $6. 

ZINC SHEETS.— There has been no 
change in trade in this line, which con 
tinues steady. We quote : Cask lots. So 
to $6.25 and part casks, $6.25 to $6.50. 

SOLDER.— Business in this line contin- 
ues brisk at unchanged prices. 

ANTIMONY.— A good business in small 
lots is doing in antimony. We auote 
$10.50 per 100 tb. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The features of the paint and oil market 
for this week are the reductions of 3c. per 
gal. |in raw and boiled linseed oil, and 2c. 
in turpentine. The decline in oil is caused 
by the manufacturers wishing to sell 
and the buyers not being over-anxious 
to purchase. The buying, therefore, at 
present is mostly in small lots. A weaken- 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ing of the primary market caused the de- 
cline in turpentine, but later advices from 
the South report a reaction there in that 
product, and it is quite likely that this 
market will follow with an advance. Trade, 
locally, has quited down considerably, and 
white leads and dry colors are inactive. A 
small sorting-up trade continues in mixed 
paints, and paris green is more active with 
some of the holders. O.herwise the market 
is featureless. We quote as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $5.87^; No. 1, $5.50 ; No. 2, 
$5.i2#; No. 3, $4-75! No. 4, 54 37# »n 
packages of 25 lb. and upwards ; j£c. per 
lb. extra will be charged for \zyi lb. pack- 
ages I genuine dry white lead in casks, 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
55 to $5.12^; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 
$5.50; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., $4; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., $4. 50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6^c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7% to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Shingle Stain — In 5-gal. lots, 60c. to 
$1.20 per gal. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, 17c. per gal.; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 
52.25 to #2.35 ; white, #2.35 to #2.45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, ioc extra. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., 52.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, #2.40 ; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., $2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2 90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, 51.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, 52.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, 51 20 to $1.40 
per gal.; No. 1, 51.10 per gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9X to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to io^c for single tins. 

Linseed Oil- Raw, 1 to 2 barrels, 79c; 
boiled, 82c, ; 3 to 5 barrels, raw, 78c; 
boiled, 81c. ; 6 to 9 barrels, raw, 76c; boiled, 
79c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamilton and 
London, 2c. less. All quantities of 10 bbls. 
and over of linseed oil, sold only f.o.b. 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Guelph. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 69c; 2 to 
4 barrels, 68c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5 c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages, 



500, and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 

charged. 

GLASS. 

There is a fair volume of business doing 
in glass, and the prospects are for a big 
trade this season. A number of dealers 
still report a scarcity in some of the 
sizes. Quotations are as follows : Under 
26 in., 54-45 '< 26 t0 4° m< > #4-65 ; 41 
to 50 in., 55.10; 51 to 60 in., 55-35 ; 
61 to 70 in., 55 75 ; 71 to 80, 56.25 ; 81 to 
85, 57 ; 86 to 90, 57.75 ; Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London. Terms, 4 months, or 3 
per cent. 30 days. Discount off pane price 
h'st, 33 l A PC cent. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

A fair business continues in old material 
and the market is steady. We quote as fol- 
follows : Heavy copper and wire, io^c.per 
lb. ; light copper, 8c. per lb. ; heavy red brass, 
ioc; heavy yellow brass, 8 to 8^c; light 
brass, 5c; lead, 2^c; scrap zinc, 2% 
to 2j£c. ; iron, No. 1 wrought, 5*4 per 
net ton ; No. 2 wrought, 56 ; machinery 
cast scrap, 514; stove plate, 5 10; malleable 
and steel, 56 ; old rubbers, 6c. per lb., and 
country mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 
HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — The market for these continues 
inactive. An advance of %c. has been made 
in the prices of cured hides. We quote : 
No. 1 green, 7>£c; No. 2 green, 6j£c; 
No. 1 green, steers, 8^c. ; No. 2 green, 
steers, 7>£c. ; cured, %% to 8j£c 

Skins — Trade in these is dull and the 
prices are unchanged. Quotations are : 
Veal skins, 6 to 14 lb. inclusive, No. 1, 
ioc. ; No. 2, 8c; do., 15 to 20 lb. inclusive, 
No. 1, 9c; No. 2, 7c; deacons (dairies), 
60 to 70c each ; lambskins, 30c; shearl- 
ings, 25c 

Wool— The stagnant condition of this 
market has not been relieved and the out- 
look for an improvement therein is not 
promising. Fleece wool is quoted at 13c, 
and unwashed, at 7c per lb. 

Tallow — The market is featureless. We 
quote d]l to 6% per lb. 
COAL. 

No change is reported in the situation at 
the mines and no prospects of a settlement 
are yet in sight. Local coal merchants 
have on hand a supply of hard coal suffi- 
cient to supply current demands, but if the 
lock-out continues that article will be very 
scarce during the winter. At the interna- 
tional bridges our quotations are as follows: 
Soft coal, 53 to 54 per ton. 

PETROLEUM. 

Trade in petroleum is fair. A number 
of orders are now being received for de- 
livery later on in the season. We 
quote as follows : Pratt's Astral, 17 
to I7^c in bulk (barrels extra); American 
water white, 17 # to 18c in barrels; 



Photogene, 17 to I7j£c; Sarnia water 
white, 16^ to 17c in barrels ; Sarnia prime 
white, 15 to 15 J£c in barrels. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Turpentine is down 2c per gal. 
Raw and boiled linseed oils have declined 
3c. per gal. 

A reduction has been made in the prices • 
of iron pipe in the sizes above 2 in. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co. are in receipt 
of an advice of a shipment of lawn swings. 
These have been scarce for some time, as 
owing to the low prices at which they are 
being sold, some of the manufacturers 
ceased making them for a while. There 
is hardly anything that pleases children so 
much as a nice lawn swing. 



STOVE WORKS FOR FORT WILLIAM. 

The by-law to give W. J. Copp and 
Harold E. Copp, of Hamilton, 515.000 to 
locate a stove, range and foundry works in 
Fort William was carried July 23, by the 
almost unanimous vote of 379 for and 23 
against. 

A HAMILTON DEFAULTER. 

Mr. H. G. Wright, of the tin manufac- 
turing firm of E. T. Wright & Co., Hamil- 
ton, says that the defalcation of J. C. 
McKeand would probably amount to about 
510,000. However, he could not say for 
certain, the work on McKeand' s books not 
having been finished. 



EIGHTY-THREE ELEVATORS. 

Since the season opened The Ogilvie 
Flour Mills Company of Winnipeg has 
built new elevators at Arnaud, Oakville, 
Basswood, Sinclair, Areola, Grenfell and 
Balgonie. The average capacity of these 
elevators is 32,000 bushels each. 

In addition to seven already completed, 
they intend to build 14 more. This will 
bring the total number of their elevators up 
to 83, with an aggregate capacity of 3,000,- 
000 bushels. 

The company has three gangs of men 
at work under its superintendent, H. W. 
Chafant. They will continue building at 
points they have selected all the season. 



A CAUSE OF FAILURE. 

Many a business man has come to grief 
because he lacked a reserve of capital, of 
discipline or of knowledge of his business, 
says Success. In good times, when any- 
body could sell goods, he was all right ; 
but, when a panic came, and his notes 
were refused at the bank, he went down 
because he had no reserve of savings or of 
character. 

Shrewd business men are always on the 
watch for emergencies, financial storms or 
panics ; they know perfectly well that it 
takes a very different kind of ship timber 
to wrestle with the tempests than it requires 
in pleasant weather, when there is no strain 
or stress. It is the man who prepares for 
an emergency, who keeps his sails trimmed 
and his ship in order that weathers the gale. 



Fire caused damage to McLean's hard- 
ware store, 121 Dundas street, London, on 
July 22, to the extent of 510,000 or 511,000, 
Damage was covered by insurance. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



Bath Room Accessories 



3.MT 



Hundreds of Hardware Dealers throughout 
the country ran create business by carrying in stock a full 
line of our nickel plated fixtures for the bath room. 
Every fixture is showy, and a display of them in the show 
window will attract much attention and will bring 
business. We shall be very glad to tell jou more about this 
line which, briefly stated, consists of Shower Bath equipment, Towel 
Racks, Towel Shelf, Towel Horse, Towel Basket, Sponge, Soap and 
Tumbler Holder, Robe Hooks, Comb and Brush Trays, Toilet Paper 
Holdeis, etc., all heavily nickel plated. Prices on application. 



6fA_jA 



?;wk*»» 



WORKS : ST. HELENS, ENGLAND, and MAUBEUGE, FRANCE. 

Pilkington Brothers, Limited 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Polished Plate and Window Glass 
Prismatic Rolled and Wired Glass 
Plain and Bevelled Mirror Plates 



Rolled Plate 
Fancy Cathedral 
Colored Glass, etc. 



DEPOTS ; 



Our Prismatic Glass gives the best results of any Prism Glass on the market. 
BlJSby Lane, Montreal, and Mercer Street, Toronto. Should be glad to show you our Prismatic Exhibit in our Warerooms. 




Winning Favor in Australia 

"The engineering merchants here consider your Solid Box Blacksmiths' 
Vises superior in quality and workmanship to any they have ever handled. 
They say they are remarkably suitable, and give perfect satisfaction." 

[Extract from letter received from our Australian Agents located in Melbourne.] 



Our facilities are unexcelled for making 



* Blacksmiths' and Machinists' Vises 



Modern equipment and methods, high-grade material and workmanship 
are combined in our plant, producing 



THE BEST VISES MADE 



4 



CANADIAN SALES AGENTS 



19 De Bresoles St., Montreal 
Manufactured by 



THE COLUMBIAN HARDWARE COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

NEW CATALOGUE JUST ISSUED-WRITE FOR IT. 




30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



BUILDING PERMITS IN TORONTO. 

FOLLOWING arc the building permits 
taken out in Toronto during the 
week : G. M. Ritchie, 2 ^-storey 
frame dwelling. Lentz avenue, near Lee 
avenue, for $800; trustees Westmoreland 
Methodist Church, for a two-storey and 
attic brick? dwelling, Westmoreland ave., 
near Hallam ave., for §2,000 ; Macdonald 
Manufacturing Company, for a third ad- 
ditional storey to factory, near Queen 
( street, on Spadina ave., for $4,300; Rev. 
William MeCann, for one-storey stone and 
brick R. C. church, corner of Arthur and 
Grace streets, for $15,000 ; Jno. Alexan- 
der, for third addition storey, brick, pur- 
pose, photo gallery, 16 Adelaide street 
west, for $600 ; Jno. Gorde, for one- 
storey roug-hcast dwelling- sear Dover- 
court Road, on Van Home street, for 
$400 ; The W. & D. Dineen Co., Limited, 
for a four-storey stone and brick factory, 
10-12 Temperance street, for $10,000 ; 
Baun & Farmouth, for two-storey stable, 
College street, for $200 ; R. & H. Baker, 
two-storey brick addition to factory, 
coiner of Harbord and Borden streets, 
for $400 ; John Doney, two-storey and 
attic pair semi-detached brick dwellings, 
63-65 Suromerhill ave., for $4,000 ; R. C. 
Daney, two-storey and attic brick and 
stone dwelling, on Spadina Road, near 
Bernard ave, for $4,000 ; S. B. Coon, 
lor pair semi-detached two-storey brick 
dwellings, Roxborough ave, near Yonge, 
for $5,000; W. Moss and A. Blackmore, 
one storey roughcast, addition to two 
houses, Brooklyn ave., fen- $320 ; Rev. 
Father LaMarche, for one-storey brick 
vestry, L30 King street cast, for $500 ; 
-I. Walker, pair semi-detached 2.\-storcy 
brick dwellings, 598-600 Bathurst street, 
for $4,500; Jess Applegath, alterations 
to store Front, 89 Yonge street, for $350 ; 
C. Coulter, two-storey frame and rough 
cast stable, 123 Arthur street, for $22U : 
Mis. Mary Huddart, for two-storey and 
attic brick dwelling, 150 St. Helen's ave., 
for $3,000 ; It. Blong, for one-storey wood 
verandah, 110-112 Brunswick ave., for 

.SNIMI ; Mrs. Angus Gillies, for 2. 1 -storey 

detached brick dwelling, '.til Dovercourt 
Road, for $2,000 ; trustees Advent Chris 
tian Church, for one-storey brick Sun 

day school room, corner of College and 
MoniioM- ave., for $1,5(111; II. Fit/.sim- 
mons, for two-storey brick detached resi 
dence, near Broadview ave., for $1,700: 
\V. .) . Miller, for two storey detached 
brick dwelling, near Broadview ave., 
north side of Simpson ave., tor $1,700. 



BUILDING PERMITS IN OTTAWA. 

Building Inspector Pratt issued nine 

permits during the week, of which the 

majority wen; for additions to dwell 

W. Green, frame kitchen. Archibald 

street, $200; A. -I. Magurn, solid brick 

tdd to printing office, Wellington 



street, $225 ; Bate & Co., ironclad ware- 
house, Bank street, $200 ; P. Aitchison, 
frame building, Pretoria avenue, $7<»0 . 
Joseph Hcyden, frame dwelling, King 
street, $250 : Frank Rohde, frame addi- 
tion to dwelling, McKay street, $350 ; R. 
S. Chandler, brick-veneered addition to 
dwelling, James street, $400 ; Charles 
W. Donivan, terrace of four brick-veneered 
dwellings, Daly avenue, $6,000. 



PLUMBING NOTES. 

A singularly neat and attractive ad- 
vertisement has just been issued by 
Owen & Presho, 6 Wellington street east, 
Toronto, practical plumbers and gasfit- 
t»rs. Though the idea is old, advertise 
ments of this style always prove wel- 
come. Their list of fire alarms is par- 
ticularly bright, and surrounds an adver- 
tisement of the firm. 



LAWSUIT OVER A PATENT. 

The Canada Water and Sewage Purify- 
ing Company, of Windsor, Ont., has be- 
gun proceedings against the city of 
Winnipeg for an alleged infringement of 
patent. Winnipeg has always had 
trouble with its water supply, owing to 
alkali. In 1891 The Pittsburg Testing- 
Laboratory Company took hold, and has 
just finished a system which softens the 
water and purifies it to a great extent. 
The description of the system appeared 
in an engineering paper, and the direc- 
tors of the Windsor company were struck 
with the similarity between their inven- 
tion and the system used by the Pitts- 
burg people. An investigation followed, 
and it is alleged that the plant installed 
at Winnipeg is similar to the one on 
which the Windsor concern holds patents. 



PLUMBERS PLAY INDOOR BASEBAL L 

The Hamilton plumbers visited Brant- 
ford plumbers on Saturday. Owing to 
the inclement weather, indoor baseball 
took the place of outdoor sports. The 
features of the game were McPherson's 
base running and Squibb's work in right 
field. McArdlc, for Hamilton, put up a 
splendid game, and the work of the re- 
ferees gave entire satisfaction. 

The umpires were A. Haworth and 
Charles Taylor. The morning game re- 
sulted 15 to 19 in favor of Brantford and 
the afternoon game. 23 to 21 in favor of 
Hamilton, 

The following is the line-up of the 
two teams : 

Hamilton — Smith, s.=.; Walsh, 2b; McAn- 
drew?, p.; Drake, lb.; McArdle, 3b.; Garsom, r.f.; 
Harris, l.f.J Stanton, c.f. 

Brantford— Whitfield, p.; Minnes, c; Qua, rb.; 
McPherson, 2b.; Pohlman, 3b.; Muirhead, s.s.; 
Anguish, l.f.j Squibb, r.f. 

After the morning game the visitors 
were dined at the Belmont, and after the 
second game refreshments were served at 
the Vendoine, where also a programme 
was rendered. The visitors expressed 
themselves as having enjoyed their out 
ing heartily. 



BUILDING IN MONTREAL. 

Montreal has felt the building boom as 
well as other Canadian cities. During the 
first six months of this year, Alcide 
Chausse has issued 428 permits for build 
ings, with a total value of $1,766,689. 
This is an increase in the number of per- 
mits of 310 and 74 respectively for the 
same periods in 1900 and 1901, while the 
increase in value over 1900 is $983,659, 
and over 1901, $619,212. The aggregate 
of values of buildings, for which, this 
year, up to date, permits have been given 
is $1,885,338. 

During the last week the following 
building permits were taken out in Mont 
real : William Smith, 56 Simpson street, 
on Busby Lane, one warehouse, four 
storeys, $6,000 ; M. J. Archambault, 777 
Cadieux street, on City Hall ave., one 
house, two dwellings of two storeys, for 
$2,450 ; The Chevra Cadisha Corpora- 
tion, Jos. Ruhin, 517 Craig street, on 
St. Urbain street, one factory, $16,000 : 
G. Ross, 1116 Sherbrooke street, one 
house, one dwelling, four storeys, $6,000 ; 
Lueien Huot, 55 Street Railway Building, 
at 584 Sherbrooke, street, one house, four 
dwellings, three storeys, $8,000; Domin- 
ion Bridge Company, 317 St. Patrick 
street, alterations to one house of two 
storeys, $3,1 )l 10 ; Armand Goyer, 1224 De 
Montigny street, on Sangimet street, one 
house of three dwellings of three storeys, 
$3,000. 



WATERWORKS CONTRACTS. 

Dobson, Jackson & Fry, of Medicine 
Hat, N.W.T., have just completed the 
construction of a waterworks system at 
Suflield, N.W.T., and a sewer at Medicine 
Hat, upon which they have been engaged 
for seven months. They have now the 
contract for a waterworks and sewage 
system at Edmonton, as well as for lay- 
ing five and a half miles of gas mains at 
Medicine Hat. Mr. Fry will supervise 
the work at Edmonton, and Mr. Oobson 
that at Medicine Hat. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

The .John Ritchie Plumbing and Heat- 
ing Company, Adelaide street east. To- 
ronto, reports the following contracts ; 
Plumbing for Delaney & Pcttit's new fac- 
tory, .Jefferson ave.; plumbing and heat- 
ing for the residence of .1. B. Andrews, 
corner of King and Jefferson ave.; the 
plumbing for residence of H. H. Hall ; 
alterations for plumbing lo residence of 
Jno. Morrison, (benville street ; plumb 
ing of new residence for Miss A. B. Orde;' 
plumbing and steam heating to the new 
addition to the Boys' Home. George 

street. 



MR. FLETT IN FORT WILLIAM. 

H. R. Flett, of The Dominion Radiator 
Company, Toronto, visited Fort William 
last week in connection with the con- 
tract his firm has to equip The Marks- 
Clavet Dobic Company's new busi 
block with a heating plant. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 


31 


PAINT 
SPECIALTIES 


CORDAGE 

ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 


. RAMSAYS EXTERIOR LEAD, always the leader in the 
lead market — advertised to all architects and painters in 
Canada. Ordered by dealers because it's easy to sell, pays 
well and satisfies all — Special booklets to help. 


Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 


Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 


RAMSAYS VIENNA GREEN. A clean, pure, rich green in 
three shades, away ahead of imported greens and cheaper as 
well. The strongest and brightest of all the greens, to cover 
anything that should be green and kept green — booklets- 


Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cablei 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 


RAMSAYS OUTSIDE PAINTS. This is the paint for the 
farmer's barn. It's what he wants for his outhouses, fences, 
etc. It does the work and isn't dear. It pays. 


RAMSAYS UNIVERSAL VARNISH. It is made for the 
boat, the canoe, the house, the church doors wainscots 


"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 


from the finest quality Manila 

IE COMPANY, 


anything that wants a varnish that is all varnish and nothing 
else. 


CONSUMERS GORDAG 

WM. B. STEWART, 
TOM 17 Front St. West, TORONTO. 




A. RAMSAY & SON, paint and varnish makers. 
MONTREAL. established i842. 


MONTREAL, QUE. 









: 




BtAiv .BrUfcfl 
















- 






, 


\ 






k 








ff'j^m 


■ 


mwi\^ 


" ::, ' ; i, 








■# 








iBRa? 








~Wk ' 




*mJ/k 







There is always economy in buying the BEST. 
Time saved is money gained. 



We have no hesitation in making the statement that 

??™. Pulley Blocks 



are the best made, longest wearing and quickest oper- 
ating blocks on the market. 

They are good sellers, and it will pay you to have them. 

We are carrying a large stock, and our prices and cata- 
logues will interest you. Send for them. 



THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY, 



SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS FOR 



One minute's work with The TRIPLEX 
BLOCK. 



The Yale & Towne IVI-fg. Oo. 

Montreal and Vancouver 



62 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STEEL WIPES OUT IRON INDUSTRIES 

HENRY SIMPSON, in the mining and 
metallurgical number of Cassier's 
Magazine, points out that less 
than a quarter of a century ago Middles- 
brough, Eng., had little to do with the 
manufacture of steel, though it was one 
of the most important finished iron-mak- 
ing centres in the world, and in the zen- 
ith of its prosperity so far as regards the 
value of the iron output, which was as 
recently as 1S73, it had 2,136 out of the 
7,159 puddling furnaces at that time in 
existence in Great Britain. The make of 
finished iron even 20 years ago was 726,- 
000 tons, but directly after 1882 there 
commenced a rapid decline, so that in 
1900 only 136,000 tons were produced, 
and in 1901 about 94,000 tons. 

This remarkable change has been 
brought about solely by the supersession 
of iron by steel, first as a material for 
use on the permanent way of railways 
and afterwards as a material for the con- 
struction of both steam and sailing ves- 
sels. 

It was about the year 1875 that steel 
began to encroach on the business of the 
iron-rail makers, and in this district the 
production of iron rails (which in 1873 
was over 374,000 tons, and formed 53 per 
cent, of its total output of finished iron) 
had by 1876 dropped to 124,000 tons 
owing to the competition of steel. In 
1879 the output had dwindled to 8,000 
tons, or only 2 per cent, of the total 
production. This decline in the iron-rail 
trade was a heavy blow to the iron 
manufacturers of the North of England, 
which had been the chief seat of that 
business in Great Britain. 

But to counterbalance this falling off 
there sprang up toward the close of the 
seventies a vast extension of shipbuild- 
ing, so great, in fact, that it required 
more iron than was necessary to make 
up for the decline by the loss of the rail 
trade. Now both the iron rail and plate 
trades are of very little importance. 

How severely the extension of the steel 
trade in the district has affected the fin- 
ished iron trade will be appreciated when 
it is stated that out of the 45 finished 
iron manufactories that were in operation 
in the Northeast of England a quarter of 
a century ago 25 have completely disap- 
peared ; nine still exist as iron rolling 
mills ; two have added a steel plant to 
their iron works ; six have been convert- 
ed into steel rolling mills and have aban- 
doned altogether the manufacture of fin- 
ished iron ; two roll steel but do not 
make it, and one is now a foundry. Thus, 
only 20 of the old works are still in ex- 
istence. Four entirely new steel rolling 
mills have been established since 1876, 
and at the present time 23 works are en- 
gaged in the North of England in the 
production of manufactured iron and 



steel, of which 10 are steel works pure 
and simple. 

THE ONLY WAY. 

Truthfulness in dealing with tha public 
outweighs all other considerations. Why 
should 1 be the less careful about the 
statements I make in talking to the pub- 
lic through the press than when speak- 
ing face to face ? I speak to each indi- 
vidual who reads my advertisement ; my 
relation to him is a personal one. I 
must win his confidence. I can only do 
it by telling him the truth. Not only 
must I take good care that I do not de- 
ceive him, but I must so word my 
advertisement that he cannot be self- 
deceived by it.— Dean Alvord, before the 
New York Sphinx Club. 



LINSEED IN 1901-1902. 

SPEAKING of the world's linseed 
crop in 1902, Dornbusch says that 
although the yield from India 
proved better than indicated early in the 
season and was again rather larger than 
in the preceding year, it fell short of the 
average. Argentina produced its record 
crop, and the exports last year increased 
160,000 tons on those of 1900. No fig- 
ures have yet been published regarding 
the Russian outturn, but, judging from 
the poor shipment total of 55,377 tons, 
it may safely be assumed that the crop 
did not exceed 100,000 tons, or only 25 
per cent, of the previous year. The 
United States of America, like the River 
Plate, had its banner crop and produced 
650,000 tons, or 175,000 tons larger than 
1900, which then stood its highest. Ship- 
ments to Europe, however, were not in 
proportion, as the 73,000 tons exported 
were not only 45,000 tons short of the 
quantity in 1897, but a moiety even then 
had to be brought back. Every season 
this has been the case, and North Amer- 
ica always proves to sell more than it 
can spare for European requirements, and 
cancelling contracts or buying back in- 
variably follows. Directing attention to 
the United Kingdom imports, it is found 
that the needs of Great Britain show a 
falling off and for last year went below 
the average by 57,000 tons. British mills 
used about the same quantity of Indian 
seed as in 1900 and took up more of La 
Plata. India has left for shipment but 
little more than half the quantity at this 
date last season, and, with Russia about 
in the same poor position to export as a 
year ago, it looks as if the " visible sup- 
ply " for the next few months must 
diminish. Prospects of shipments in the 
late autumn are favorable as regards 
America. The Argentine also promises to 
be a free shipper again this season, but 
December is the earliest this Republic can 
move its crop to the seaboard, and even 
then only under the most favorable crop 
conditions. Summarizing the foregoing, 
it would appear that the sources of sup- 
ply will be restricted for the rest of the 
calendar year, while from now onward 
the market may be subject to the custom- 
ary budgei of crop scares. 



DISAPPEARING WINDOW SCREEN. 

A WINDOW screen with entirely 
new features has been patented 
by Henry T. Wright, of Phila- 
delphia. Nothing adds more to the com- 
fort of a house than a good equipment 
of screens and yet the bother and trouble 
of putting them in in the spring and 
taking them out in the fall and thciij 
care during the winter months is a seri- 
ous drawback to their use. The screens 
cannot be thrown into the cellar or some 
unused shed when they are not wanted, 
but must be stored in some place where 
they will not be subjected to the ex- 
tremes of temperature or dampness. 

Considerable expense is occasioned by 
retaining the services of a man skilled in 
the use of tools to adjust the windows 
in the spring. 

With the screen referred to, all the cares 
and troubles attendant on their use is 
dispensed with absolutely. When the 
screen is wanted for service it can be 
summoned into place instantly, and, 
when there is no occasion for its pres- 
ence, it sinks into a pocket in the wall, 
out of sight and yet stored in the very 
best possible place for its reception which 
could possibly be devised. 

The Wright screen is part of the win- 
dow frame and a larger one below, and 
can be placed in buildings in the course of 
construction, although it is readily possi- 
ble to place them in old houses. There 
is a small pocket at the top of the win- 
dow frame and a larger one below, and in 
these the screens are reposing when not 
in use. The upper rail of the top sash 
and the lower rail of the lower sash are 
fitted with a means of fastening the 
screen to the sash, and when this union 
is effected the screens follow the sash as 
it is moved up and down to suit the 
wishes of the occupant of the room. On 
the lower sash the fastener consists of a 
knob which also takes the place of a 
sash-lift. An arrow is engraved thereon, 
and when this is in a horizontal position, 
it indicates that the sash is working in- 
dependently, but when the arrow is 
placed in an upright position, the sash 
and screen are working in unison. This 
arrangement permits the window to be 
opened from both the top and bottom, 
giving the best possible ventilation and 
yet both openings are properly protected. 
The screen frame is of metal and as it 
is always protected from hard usage, its . 
life is very long, but should it become 
necessary to renew it, the screen can be 
very readily taken out and replaced in a 
very short time, and the operation can 
be done by anyone with even the most 
rudimentary knowledge of the use of 
tools. 

Resides being adapted for use on dwell- 
ings, office building's, hotels and similiar 
structures, this window screen is also 
applied to the railroad car window. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



What do you require in the way of 

CANS? 

we manufacture the very best quality of 

Paint and Color Cans, round and square. 
Varnish and Oil Cans. Paint Irons 

Paint Packages. Lye Tins. 

and every description of Tin or Can required by 
the trade. We shall be pleased to send you 
quotations for anything you need in our line. 



The Acme Can Works, 

OFFICE AND FACTORY : 

Ontario St. and Jeanne D'Arc Ave., 
MONTREAL. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL. WILLIAM PRATT. 



Star Safety 
Razor. 

The original and best Safety. 
'•*) Shaves Clean Saves Title Never Pulls 




A Marvel of Simplicity and Durability 



Beware of Imitations. 

The Three Star Safety is the only Safety 
Razor that can be adjusted to a hair's width 
by anybody to suit any face or beard by means 
of adjusting screws, fully protected from in- 
fringers by the U.S. Circuit Court. 




Establish- 
ed 1875. 



For sale by all leading dealers throughout Canada. 
Rock bottom prices upon application to 

KAMPFE BROS., 

INVENTORS AND MANUFACTURERS, 



8 Reade Street 



NEW YORK CITY 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895. 




DINNER PAILS 



4sfr 






d 




%° 




% 



"Old English" 

Made of IX Tin, 4 qt. only. 



Square 

With cup and deep tray. 
854 in. long. 
6 in. high. 
6 in. deep. 



Railroad 

IX Tin, well made with trays. 
1 1 in. long. 
8 in high. 
8% in. deep. 



Also NESXABLE and all sizes of cheaper grades — round and oval. 

THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited 

MONTREAL. 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PIG IRON OUTPUT LARGE. 

THE Iron Age in its current issue says 
of the capacity of blast furnaces in 
operation : 

" In spite of the blowing out and banking 
of a number of blast furnaces in the east, 
in Virginia and in the Ohio Valley, the 
active capacity with which we entered the 
second half of the year is as large as it has 
ever been. This is due to the fact that a 
number of large plants, notably in the 
Central West, have resumed after the short 
strike of the furnacemen in the valleys. 

" The weekly capacity of the furnaces in 
blast on July i compares as follows with 
that of the preceding periods : 

Total Coke Charcoal 

capacity capacity capacity 

per weeK. per per 

Giwa tone. w< ek. week. 

July 1, 1902 35?,590 344.950 7,640 

June 1 344 J49 337,492 7,256 

May 1 352,064 345,627 6,437 

April 1 »37 424 331,140 6,284 

March 1 323,028 316.039 6,989 

February 1 332,45 32,440 6,605 

January 1 298, 410 291, 99i 6,468 

December I, 190' 324,761 3 7,358 7,403 

November 1 320,824 313,775 7,049 

October 1 307,982 300.538 7,444 

September 1 299,861 293,256 6,605 

Auguatl 303,84/ 297,<t9 6,578 

July 1 310,950 303,793 7,157 

" The position of furnace stocks, sold and 
unsold, as reported to us, was as below on 
July i, as compared with the five preceding 
months, the same furnaces being represented 
as in former months. This does not include 
the holdings of the steel works producing 
their own iron : 

Stocks— Feb. V M y. 1 June 1. July 1. 

Anthracite and cok*.... 121,762 96,315 57 231 61,312 
Charcoal 3.',43i 29,030 15,977 13,725 

Total 154,500 125,348 73,208 75,037 

" The sharp decline in the stocks of char- 
coal iron is noticeable." 

CARRYING TRADE OF THE UNITED 
KINGDOM. 

The Liverpool Steamship Owners' Asso 
ciation have just prepared a very interesting 
series of tabular comparative statements 
with respect to the carrying trade of the 
United Kingdom during the 10 years 1891- 
1900, showing the part of that trade carried 
in British and foreign vessels, distinguish- 
ing the trade with foreign countriesand that 
with British possessions, and also dis- 
tinguishing vessels with cargo and those in 
ballast. The figures have been obtained 
from the " Annual Statements of the Navi- 
gation and Shipping of the United King- 
dom." The tonnage of vessels with cargoes 
trading to foreign countries in 1891 com- 
prised 36,428,937 British and 15,816,415 
foreign, while iu 1900 the figures were 42,- 
780,184 tons British and 26,566,40310ns 
foreign. The annual average for the 10 
years was 40,860,575 tons British and 18,- 
887,284 tons foreign. The percentage of 
British decreased from 69^ to 61^, while 
that of foreign increased from 30 X to 38 X. 
the annual average percentages for the 
whole decade being respectively 68 and 32. 
The vessels trading from the United King- 



dom to British possessions with cargo were 
of 9 105,416 tons in 1891 and 9,551,871 
tons in 1900, while foreign ships were of 
963,456 tons in the former year and 959, 586 
tons in the latter. The annual average 
percentage of British increased in the 10 
years from 90^ to gr}^, while that of 
foreign decreased from g}4 to 8^. 

A SAVING IN FUEL. 

A PROCESS has been discovered by 
which a saving of 25 per cent, can 
be effected on the cost of coal 
either for domestic or manufacturing pur- 
poses. At least, this is the claim according 
to Stoves and Hardware Reporter made by 
the inventor, who is said to have sold the 
process to a syndicate of capitalists in this 
country for a round half million of dollars. 
They must have considerable faith in the 
working value of the process, yet there is 
always a doubt to be cast on any invention 
which merely promises to revolutionize 
methods on which inventive minds have 
been at work for years without success. 
Some time ago a process for making good 
fuel out of common clay was exploited, but 
if it was a success no one outside of those 
immediately interested has become aware 
of the fact. There are various pat- 
ents covering methods for the con- 
centration of heat from the sun's 
rays and distributing it from a central 
station, but no plant has been installed so 
far as the commercial or scientific records 
inform us, and the practicability of the 
method is still open to question. There is 
no desire to cast a doubt upon any fuel- 
saving process in advance of its demonstra- 
tion as either a success or a failure, but 
their repeated discoveries without effective 
results recall the experience of a large user 
of power who was called upon by a number 
of inventors in succession, each one of 
whom offered him a device that was guar- 
anteed to save him from 10 to 50 per cent, 
in fuel. A brief calculation showed him 
that by using all these devices together he 
could save more than 100 per cent, in fuel 
and have a considerable quantity left over, 
a calculation, however, which reduced the 
several claims to an absurdity. 



NO MORE NEED FOR IT. 

A characteristic story is told of Abe 
Gruber, the well-known New York lawyer. 
When he was a boy looking for something 
to do he saw the sign, "Boy Wanted," 
hanging outside of a store in New York. 
He picked up the sign and entered the 
store. The proprietor met him. 

' ' What did you bring that sign in here 
for ? " asked the storekeeper. 

"You won't need it any more," said 
Gruber, cheerfully, "I'm going to take 
the job." — Washington Post. 



VaRNIIH 

Specialties 

for every day use. 

Amberite Interior Finish. 

Amberite Exterior Finish. 

Amberite Pale Church 
Oak Varnish. 

Amberite Floor Varnish. 

Amberite Extra Pale 
Oil Finish. 

The Celebrated "Sun" 
Varnish. 

The Peerless "Copal" Varnish • 

Amberite Pale Copal 
Spar Varnish. 

Amberite Pale Copal 
Boat Varnish. 

Coach Varnishes. 

Furniture Varnishes. 

Shellac Varnishes. 

Handy Varnishes — in small 
tins, for Domestic use. 

Varnishes for all Purposes. 

Stove Pipe Varnish. 

For Varnishes and Japans of every 
description, address: 

THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY, 

Limited, 

Montreal or Toronto. 






< 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



THAT OLD RUSTED STOCK 

Why don't you get it together 
and have it made like new ? 

WE REPLATE, REPOLISH 

all kinds of Metal Goods in 
Gold, Silver, Copper, Brass 
\ and Nickel. 

Don't put it off any longer. Get 

the old stock fixed up for your trade. 

WRITE US FOR PRICES. 

MOORE & ORR, E S« 

81 Adelaide St. W., - - TORONTO. 

The Grey and Bruce Portland 
Cement Company of Shallow 
Lake, Limited, 

Manufacturers of 
"HERCULES" BRAND OF 

Portland Cement 

Unsurpassed for Sidewalks, Floors, and all 

work requiring the Highest Grade 

of Portland Cement. 

HEAD OFFICE: OWEN SOUND. 




HARNESS PREPARATIONS. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 

HARNESS DRESSING 

Recognized as 
" THE STANDARD." 

Produces a brilliant jet- 
black gloss which will not 
peel or smut and to which 
dirt will not stick. 





Frank Miller's 

Harness Soap 

Unrivaled for 
cleaning and soft- 
ening Harness 

Put up in cakes, 
pans, boxes and 
tubs. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil. 



Preserves and softens the leather, 
thus adding life. 

The highest quality of oil on the 
market. 



-JMXU "_ 

LRNES3 
OIL 



^.FRANK Mitt*** 
NEW VORK^ 



Windsor Mills 

A Superior Writing Paper 

Every business man should make 
sure that his quality of writing paper 
is good — the kind that pleases — for 
he must have good writing paper 
if he would give character to his 
business. 



CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



The Oshawa Wire Fence Co. 

OSHAWA, OIMT. Limited 

Manufacturers of... 

Woven Wire Fencing, Gates, Etc. 

Also Dealers in Galvanized Fence Wire. 




Agents wanted Send for catalogue and prices. 



The P. R. Cumming Manufacturing Co. 



Limited, 

TORONTO 



We beg to advise the trade that we have purchased a large factory 
in Clarksburg, where we are installing a complete outfit of new automatic 
machinery for the manufacture of all kinds of Enamelled Wood 
Xurnings; and that we have also acquired the business of The 
Dominion Skewer Co., so that we now possess facilities unequalled 
in Canada for the production of curtain poles, rings, broom handles, enamelled 
knobs and handles, skewers, flagstaffs, etc., in addition to our present lines 
of kitchen specialties, such as can openers, mincing knives, mouse traps, etc. 

Yours truly, 

The P. R. Cumming Manufacturing Co., 



LIMITED, 



90 Richmond Street East. TORONTO. 



Ef , ,|I.U.-UlA.J.,. .B i «IJ«-JW!l 



■JWJUSJ!!l^i>J»!lUMLJ||iJ^^ 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

THE creditors of A. H. Pare, general 
merchant, Point de Maskinonge, 
Que., will meet on July 26. 

The creditors of R. T. Stone & Co., 
general merchants. Melanchton, Ont., meet 
on July 29. 

John W. Ross is curator of The Dominion 
Sporting Goods Co., Montreal. 

Geo. T. Pendrith & Co., machinists, etc., 
Toronto, have assigned to £. R. C. 
Clarkson. . 

Jos. St. Hilaire, contractor, Etchemin, 
Que., has assigned and G. Darveau is pro- 
visional guardian. 

Miss Sarah Smith, general merchant, 
Metapedia, Que., has compromised at 30c. 
on the dollar cash. 

Benjamin Gallant, general merchant, 
Bloomfield Station, P.E.I. , is offering to 
compromise at 25 per cent. cash. 

Dominic Mignac, stove and hardware 
merchant, Montreal, has assigned and his 
creditors had a meeting on July 25. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Torrance & Muir, coal dealers, Montreal, 
have dissolved. 

May & McWhinnie, roofers, Ottawa, 
have dissolved. 

The Centure Patent Lock and Latch Co., 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

Berthelette & Cie, carriage manufacturers, 
etc., Montreal, have dissolved. 

Squire, Watson & Co., wholesale hard- 
ware and commission merchants, Montreal, 
have dissolved. 

Smith & Burgoyne, hardware merchants. 
McCreary, Man., have dissolved ; F. M. 
Smith continues. 

C. R. Stewart & Co., general merchants, 
Rosenfield, Que., are dissolving. C. K. 
Stewart will continue alone. 

Maguire Bros., builders' supplies and 
coal and wood merchants, Montreal, have 
dissolved ; Wm. Maguire continues. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

Tweed & Ewart, general merchants, 
Medicine Hat, N.W.T., are advertised to 
retire from business. 

CHANGES. 

Pepin & Bigras, masons, Montreal, have 
registered. 

J. N. Forler, tinsmith, Elgin, Man., has 
opened there. 

Riopel & Crochetiere. contractors, Mont- 
real, have registered. 

J. J. & P. Watson, fuel merchants, Mont- 
real, have registered. 

J. & W. Duncan, lumber merchants, 
Montreal, have registered. 

A. Anderson, tinsmith, Newdale, Man., 
has sold out to A. R. Fanning. 



A. A. Laferriere & Cie, general merchants, 
Villeray, Que., have registered. 

H. Cooke & Sons, general merchants 
Farnham, Que., have registered. 

G. A. Moir, hardware merchant, Cobden, 
Ont., has retired from business. 

B. J. Coghlin & Co., wholesale hardware 
merchants, Montreal, have registered. 

~ J. A. McKercher, sawmiller, Elko, B.C., 
is succeeded by the Hayes Lumber Co. 

Hilton, Gibson & Co., manufacturers' 
agents, Winnipeg, are out of business. 

E. K. Watson & Co., hardware mer- 
chants, etc., Montreal, have registered. 

J. M. Wade, painter and decorator, 
Truro, N.S., is removing to Port Hood. 

Thomas Greenway, lumber merchant, 
Crystal City, Man., has sold out to Austin 
Blain. 

The estate of R. Hill, general merchant, 
Ballantrae, Ont., has been sold to W. H. 
Jones. 

Sigredeur Eyolfsson, hardware merchant, 
Saltcoats, N.W.T., has sold out to A. 
Anderson. 

Taylor & Haggart, manufacturers of iron 
bedsteads, Victoria, B.C., are contemplat- 
ing removing to Vancouver. 

FIRES. 

Myres & Pedden, ironworkers, Winnipeg, 
have sustained small damage by fire. 

Gillean McLean, hardware merchant, 
London, Ont., was partially burned out ; 
insured. 

DEATHS. 

Robert Stevenson, builder, St. Stephen, 
N.B., is dead. 

J. A. Graves, of. Graves Bros., general 
merchants, Tilsonburg, Ont., is dead. 



IRON MOULDERS' APPRENTICES. 

On Monday the International Iron 
Moulders' Convention, in session in 
Toronto, discussed the request presented 
to them by representatives of the Stove 
Founders' National Defence Association 
that the ratio of apprentices to journeymen 
be increased from one to eight, as it is at 
present, to one to five. They claimed that 
the present number of apprentices was not 
sufficient to keep up the supply of moulders. 

The committee appointed to discuss the 
proposal were not unanimous in their recom- 
mendation. The majority report recom- 
mended the ratio of one to six ; the minority 
favored one to seven. 

The principal argument of those opposed 
to increasing the ratio of apprentices was 
that when the next period of depression 
comes there will be more moulders than 
there is work for. 

A large number of resolutions were sub- 
mitted, but it was finally decided to con- 
tinue the present ratio of one to eight. This 
was carried by a majority of three to one. 



NO INTERRUPTION. 

Notwithstanding the severe damage to 
their Montreal plant by fire, The Henderson 
& Potts Co., proprietors of The Nova 
Scotia Paint and Varnish Works, will be 
able to continue business from the Halifax 
factory without interruption. Orders are 
being shipped from that factory now, the 
firm allowing their customers the difference 
in freight, while the necessary repairs are in 
progress on the Montreal factory. The 
latter is being rapidly overhauled, and in a 
few weeks everything will be in order again. 



To good management 
men and tools, add Apollo 
galvanized iron. 

There is no way to do so 
good work or to make so 
much profit on it. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

58 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



37 



YOU 

NATURALLY 
.EXPECT 



that the goods you buy will give entire satisfaction 
to those who buy from you. When you purchase 

2 arid 3 Ply Ready Roofing, 
Building Papers, 
Shea-thing and Carpet F"el"t, 
Coal Tar Products, 
Hanging and Print Paper, 
Brown and Manilla Wrapping 



from us your expectations will be realized. Our lines are all guaranteed to give entire satisfaction. Quality, the best. 

ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., 82 McGill Street, MONTREAL 



PAPER MILLS: JOLIETTE, QUE. 



FELT FACTORY: HARBOR AND LOGAN STREETS, MONTREAL. 



CURRENT JVIARI^ET QUOTATIONS 



July 25, 1902 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures beiDg for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor i-i anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent error* in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accuiate. 
MET/VLS 
TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 23 lb. ingot-, 100 lb. $32 00 $33 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates Bright. 
M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Per box. 

I.C., usual sizes $6 75 

I.X. " 8 25 

I.X.X. " 9 75 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

I.C 6 75 

I.X 8 25 

I.X.X 9 75 

Karen and Vulture Grades — 

I- ', usual sizes 5 00 

I.X. " 6 00 

I.X.X. " 7 00 

I.X.X.X. " 8 00 

D.C., 12y,xl7 4 50 

D.X 5 23 

D.X.X 6 00 

Coke Plates— Blight. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O., usual size, 12x20 4 25 

I.C, special sizes, base 4 75 

20x28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates - Terne. 
Dean or J.G. Grade - 

I.C, 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

I.X., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X.X., 14x56, 50 sheet bxs.") 
" 14x60, " V .... 06'/ 2 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 8 00 

" " 26 " 8 50 

IRON AND STEEL. 
Common bar, per 100 lb. ... 1 95 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Ho seshoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoop steel, iy 2 to 3 in. base 2 90 

Sleigh shoe steel, " a 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 285 300 

T.Firth&Co.'stool steel, per lb 12% 13 

Jessop's tool steel OH 

Morton's tool steel 12'/ 2 13 

Black Diamond and "B.C." 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's toDl steel .... 08 09 
Park's " silver " tool steel. ... 12 14 

" "special" 15 20 

Jonas & Colver's tool steel. 08 15 
A " "air hardening " SO 50 

# Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

BOILER TUBES. Per foot. 

1%, \% and 4 inch 09 

2% in 16 

3in 13 

3Vi in Ii 16 

4 n 31 

STEEL BOILER PLATE. 

»4in 2 50" 2 60 

3-16in 2 60 2 70 

% in. and thicker 2 50 2 60 

BLACK SHEETS. Com. D.F1. 

18 gauge 2 85 3 00 

20 " 2 85 3 00 

22 to 24 gauge 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 " 3 15 

COPPER WARE, 
Discount, 50 per cent. 



CANADA PLATES. 

All dul', 52 sheets 3 00 

Half-polifhed 3 10 

Allb'ight 3 75 

IRON PIPE. 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

% raeh 2 90 

% " 240 

% " 2 65 

V. " 2 85 

% " 3 65 

1 " 5 20 

1 J 4 " 1 35 

l'/ 2 " 8 95 

2 " 12 55 

2y 2 " 20 00 

3 " 24 00 

3'/ 2 " 30 00 

4 " 37 50 

4y 2 " 42 00 

5 " 47 00 

6 " 60 00 

Ga vanized pipe— 

Vi inch 3 20 

% " 345 

% " 3 85 

% " 5 00 

1 " 7 20 

1% " loos 

1% " 12 20 

2 " 16 85 

Discount on pipe up to 2 in. 7/jpc. Larger 
pizes nett. 

Malleable Fittings— Discount 35 p.c. 
Cast Iron Fittings — 

On all cast iron fitting, including plugs, 
bushingp, unions and nipples, 60 p.c. di3. 
AH others— discount 60 p.c. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queen's 

G.C. Comet. * mer. Head. 

IS gauge 

18 to 24 gauge... 4 05 3 75 .... 4 05 
26 " .. 4 25 4 00 .... 4 25 

28 " .. 4 50 4 25 *4 40 4 50 

Less than case lots 10 to J 5c. extra. 
*29 gauge. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil. 3-16 io., per 1001b 

Vi " ■■■ 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " ... 5 25 5 50 

% " ... 4 50 4 75 

7-16 " ... 4 25 4 50 

y 2 " ... 4 20 4 50 

9-16 ' ... 4 05 4 50 

% " ... 4 00 4 50 

% " ... 4 00 4 50 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 
Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

English B.S., ton lots 14 00 

Lake Superior 

Bar*. 
Cutlength<\round, 1 / 2 to ; / 8 in 23 00 S5 00 
" round and r quare, 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

or., 14x48 and 14x60 22 00 22 50 

Plaio, 14 oz, and light, ,6 O'., 

irregular Bizes 22 50 23 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Hanisbed 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to301b.each,perlb 23 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 22 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 21 

Boiler and T. K. Pitts. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 



BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-roiled, 2x4 3 

Tubing, base, per lb 23% 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per lb 5 50 6 00 

Domestic " 

ZINC SHEET, 

5-cwt. casks 6 00 R 25 

Part c sks 6 25 6 50 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 50 3 75 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 2 1 /, lb. sq. ft., by roll 06M 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Notv.— Cut sheets y 2 crperlb. extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 37'/2 P-c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

N T«. — Cut lengths, net piice, waste pipe, 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHOT. 
Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.: chilled, §7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, §7 50. Dis- 
count, il2% p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Teims3p.c. cash, freights equalized. 
SOIL PIPE AND FITTING*. 
Discount, 60 p.c. on medium and extra 
heavy, and 55 p.c. on light soil pipe and 
fittings. 

SOLDER. Per lb. Per lb. 
Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 20 
Bar, half and-half, commer'l .... 19 l / 2 

Refined 19 

Wiping 18% 

ANIIMONY. 

Cookson's.perlb 9 JO 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 5 87'/ 2 

No. 1 5 50 

No. 2 5 12 1 /, 

No. 3 4 75 " 

No. 4 4 37/, 

Munro's Select Flake White 6 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 12% 

Brandram's B.B. Genuine 7 00" 

" No. 1 6 00 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt KM 75 

Genuine, 1 00 lb. kegs, p. r cwt 5 00 

No. ) , f 60 lb. casks, per cwt 4 25 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 50 

WHITE ZINC. 

Etra Red Seal 06 08 

No. 1 05>/, 07 

No. 2 05 " 06 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

£>o. 1, casks 5 00 

No. ), kegs 5 25 

PREPARED PAINTS. 
In Vi, % and 1-gall n tits. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities, per gallon 1 (0 

Barn (in b' Is.) CO 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints .... 1 40 

Canada Paint Co's pure 125 

Toronco Lead 4 Color Cos pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy s pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion pure 1 20 
COLORS IN OIL. 
25 lb. tins, standard Qualiy. 

Venetian red, per lb 04>/ 2 06 

Chrome yellow 12 14 

Golden ochre 08 10 

French " 06 

Marine black 09 

Chrome green 10 

French imperial green 12 

Signwriters' black 016 

Burnt umber Oil 

" sienna 11 

Raw umber 11 

" sienna 11 



COLORS, DRY. 

Common ochre, bbls 1 20 1 % 

Yellow ochre (J.F.L.S.), bbls 2 00 

Yellow ochre (La Belle) 115 1 25 

Brussels ochre j qq 

Venetian red (best), bbl 1 75 2 00 

English oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American oxides, 1 bis 1 25 2 OC 

Canadian oxides, bbls 1 25 1 75 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 15 

Burnt sienna, pure, per lb 

" umber, " " ]]] 2 10 

Raw do . '] 09 

Drop black, pure q 09 

Chrome yellow*, pure ...'. 18 

Chrome greens, pure per lb.. . 09 10 

Golden ochre 04 05 

Ultramarine blue, in ;8-lb. 

boxes, per lb 06 18 

Fire proof mineral, per 100 In 100 

GeDUineEng. Litharge,p»rlb. .... 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb 1 25 1 50 

Pure Indian red, No. 45, lb.. . 08 10 

Whiting, bbl 55 60 

English vermi lion in 30-lb. bags. 95 

PARIS GREEN. p er lb 

Petroleum, cisks W/„ 18 

Arsenic kegs 17 19 

50 1b. and lOO-.b. drums 18% 191/ 

25-lb. drums 19 20 

lib. packages 20 20'/> 

fri b '.- d0 022 22% 

lib. tins '" 

y,lb. do ," 

F.O.B. Toronto. Terms-3 p.c. off 30davs 

or 4 mos. from date of delivery ' 

BLUESTONE. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb ' ni 

PUTTY. ° 8 

Bulk in bbls 1 go 

Bulk in liss quantity 2 05 

Bladders in bbls '/ " 2 25 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose ....'. 2 40 

Bladdeis io 25-lb. tins « « 

Bladders in 12% lb. lins '.'.'.'..' \ gg 

Bladd rs in bulk or tins less than iooib 2 90 
VARNISHEi. 

™ ^ 5 " 8aL Iots - Per Sal. Net. 

C image, No. 1 150 1 BO 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

„ , '.' . rub t<ing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak j g n 

Furniture, extra , ' " 125 

No. 1 ,." 1 10 

Hard oil finish 1 65 j 75 

Light oil finish 140 1 go 

Sf'iV" "v,'-; 17 ° 1 85 

Shellac, white 2 35 2 45 

" orange .. 2 25 a 35 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 25 1 so 

black japan 85 1 50 

No. 1.. 50 75 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, eacb, 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels : Size 1 SI 20 ■ 
si-e2, 70c: size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Wiiliams' copal varnish, assorted 
case, from '/-rpts. to 1 gal. $?.50. 

CASTOR OIL. 

East iDdia, in cases, per lb. . . OOy, 10 

" small lots 10" 10. 

COD OIL, ETC. 

Cod oil, pergal 50 55 

Pure olive 1 20 

" Leatsfoot ,, 90 

GLUE 

Common 08 09 

French medal 11 OH 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 25 30 

Strip 18 50 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 15 16 



38 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STEEL, PEECH & TOZERa* 

Phoenix Special Steel Works. The Ickles, near Sheffield, England. 

Manufacturers of _— ^^^■k 

i 

Axles and Forgings of all descriptions, Billets and Spring 
Steel, Tyre, Sleigh Shoe and Machinery Steel. 



Sole Agents for Canada. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 
Cartridges. 

B. B Caps Dom. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis 4U p. o., Amer 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 5 ( and 5 p. o 

C»otral Fire Pistol and Rifle 10 d.c. A.ner. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, " Trap " and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 percent.; American, $1.61. 
Wads per lb 

Best thick white felt wadding, in % -lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown orgrey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

BeBt thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 510 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1.0U0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller* gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

' Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10- 5 4 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09% 

Brook's, " " " .... 11% 

Angers. 

Gilmour's discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunte's' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 5 75 *6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tabs. 

Zino 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inoh rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

2nd " 20 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A 'per lb. 27 

" B " 21 

" 1154 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb 25 

Frictiooless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 41 

Dynamo 27 

Special 22 

Aluminum, 99 p.o. pure "Syracuse".. 4j 

Bells. 

Hand 
Brass, 60 per oent. 
Nickel, 55 per oent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro' , discount 45 per oent 
Farm. 

American , each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wilier than 6 in., 50 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 1 in., 75 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross.... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolls and Nuts. Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) . . 55 
" full square ($'.40 list) 55 
" " Norway iron ($3 list).. 50 

Machine Bolts, all sizes ■ and 5 

Plough Bolts 50and5 

Blank Bolts 50 and 5 

Bolt Ends 50and5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65 and 5 

Coach Screws, cone point 16% 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3 l / 2 c per lb off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes 3%°. Per lb. off. 

Stove rods, per lb 5'/2 to 6c . 

Nuts, io501b. lots Vic. per lb extra, in less 
than 50 lb. lots, 'Ac extra. 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M. * 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 62%percent 

Broilers . 

Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% percent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent 

Henia.No.8. " 6 00 

Henis,No.9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

B a tcli er s ' O leaver s . 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Butcher Knives. 

Bailey's, per doz 60 6 30 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 lb 1 70 

Rtady roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per rol 8") 

Reaiy roofing, 3-plv, not under 65 lb. 

per roll 1 10 

Carpet fdlt, per ton 45 00 

Dry sheathing, per roll, 400 sq ft 35 

Tar sheathing, " ''. " 45 

Dry fibre " " " 5j 

Tarred fibre, " " " 60 

O.K. 4I.XL, " " " 65 

Resin-s'ued, " " " 40 

Oiled sheathirg, " 600 " 1 1U 

400 " 70 

R of coating, in barrels, per gal 17 

'' " small packages 25 

Rett ed tar, per barrel 4 50 

Coal tar, " 4 00 

('. ul tar, less than barrels, per gal... 15 

Roofing pith, per 100 lb 85 

Bull Rings. 

Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 In. 



Bntts. 

Wrought Brass net revised list. 

Oast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet stretchers 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 51% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 8 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 25 3 00 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 60 2 75 

Canadian hydraulio 1 25 ' 51 

Arrow 2 25 

Buffalo 2 00 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels . 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frameB — 20o. each lesB than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 56 
p.c. ; from stook in Montreal, 54 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p. c. cash in 30 days 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. *9 6 1 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Teu. SyphonWashout 6 00 
Emb. Elgin orTeu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain 9 60 
" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections I 25 

Low Dowu Oat. Sy. Jet, plain .... 1170 

" emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins P.O , 14 in 70 

" oval 17 x 14 in 150 

" 19x15 in 2 25 

C om passes, Divider s ,Ktc. 
American ,dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Conductor Pipe. 
Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch, per 100 feet 3 00 

3 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 6 75 

6 ' 9 00 

Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D.,No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, ,r 22% 

6, " 15 

Boynto pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per oent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 



EAVE TRODGH. 

10-inch, per 100 ft $3 10 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) per doz. 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 20 

7-inch 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 7U and 10 per cent 

Arcade 70 " 10 " 

Kearney 4 Foot 70 " 10 " 

Difston's 70 " 10 " 

American 70 " K " 

J. Barton Smith 7j " 10 " 

McClellan 70 " 10 " 

Eagle 70 " 10 " 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 6 1, 10 and 5 " 

Royal 80 " 

Globe 70 to 75 " 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per oen'. 
Nicholson File Co 's "Simplicity" file handle, 
per gross 85c. to $1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 





Star 


D. Di 


amend 


Size United 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Inches. 


50 ft. 


100 ft 


50 ft. 


100 ft. 




2 20 


4 25 




6 25 


26 to 40 


2 40 


4 65 




8 75 


41 to 50 




5 )0 




7 50 


51 to 60 




5 35 




8 50 


61 to 70 




5 75 




9 75 


71 to 80 




6 25 




11 00 


81 to 85 




7 00 




12 55 


86 to 90 




7 75 




15 00 










17 50 


96 to 100 








20 50 



9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



dis. 



1 20 



GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's Nos. 26 to 33, each... 165 

HALTERS. 
Rope, % per gross 

" %to% .'.■".'.■.'".';.' .'.'.'.' 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web, — per doz 1 87 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent Can. 
25 to 27% percent. 

Tack. 

Magnetio per doz 110 

Sledge. 

Canadian per b 07% 08)4 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., per lb — 
HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 

Store door, per doz 1 00 

Fork. 
C. Jt B. , dis. 40 per cent, rev list. 

Hoe. 
C. A B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. ist. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 100 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Ctnadiftn, 40 percent. 

Oross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 1394 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 
Steel bam door 5 85 6 00 



22 25 



3 00 
1 50 



1 15 
3 75 



Stearns , 4 inch 


5 00 




6 50 


Lane's covered- 






8 40 


No. 11%, 10-ft.run 


10 80 




12 60 


No. 14, 15-ft. run 


21 on 


Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. 


'% 


HARVEST TOOLS 




Discount, 60 per cent. 




HATCHETS 




Canadian, dis 40 to 42% per oent. 





CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



39 



Building Papers, Roofing Material, 
Wire Edged Ready Roofing. 

\We doo't offer you Gold Dollars for Fifty Cents, but we guarantee our customers 

First-Class Material, Reasonable Prices, Prompt Shipment, and 
Courteous and Liberal Treatment. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montreal. 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dig. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 
Heavy T and 8trap,4-in., per lb.... 06% 
" 5-in., " .... 06 ( /« 
" 6-in., " .... 06 

8-in., " .... 05% 
" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per oent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 60 p.o. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount, 45 and 5 per oent. 

HOOKS. 
Oast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 100 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought IroD. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can. dis. 
47% per oent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per oent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 
HORSE NAILS. 
"O'brand 50 and 7%n.o.off new li tl Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J head 
Countersunk, 60 per oent. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium and heavy. . 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweigbt(all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Disoount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899. 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 0) 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.o. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb ) 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.o. 

KEYS. 
Look, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N. P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz.... 6 00 9 00 
Shutter, porcelain, F. & L 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 95 1 03 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 61 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per oent. 

LANTERNS. 

' Cold Blast, per doz 7 00 

No. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No.0 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Poroelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 120 130 

LINES. 

Pishpergross 105 2 50 

Chalk 7| 1 90 7 40 

LOOKS 
Canadian, dis 40 p.o. 
Russel 4 Erwin per doz.... 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle dis. 30 p.c. 



Padlocks 
English and Am. per doz.... 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head discount 20 p.o. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, perdoz. 125 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulkingeach 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Disoount, 25 per oent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2 d and 3d $3 4 > S3 55 

3d 3 10 3 22 

4and5d 2 85 3 05 

6 and 7d 2 75 2 ! 

8and9d 2 60 2 70 

10andl2d 2 55 2 65 

16 and 20d 2 50 2 60 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 1, 2 55 

Wire nails in carlots are 82 50 
Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 75 p.c. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 percent. 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and Amerioan 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, I9w.g., ais. 51and5to 5' and 10 p.c. 
2-in. Mesh, 18 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.o. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

U.S. Navy 7 25 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oi 
can, with pump, 5 gal. 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 150 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis . 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wash tubs discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 10 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, dis. 40 p.c. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, dis. 40 p.o. 
Creamer cans, dis. 40 p.c. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per gross- .. 1 75 3 00 

Brass head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PINE TAR 

% pint in tins, per gross 7 80 

1 " " " 9 60 

PLANES. 
Wood, benoh, Canadian dis. 40 pet ce,i. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian > r American 7% 
to 40 per oent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, perdoz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Standard Compression work, dis. 60 p.o. 
"J.M.T." Cushion work. dis. 10 p.o. 
Fuller work, dis. 65 p.c. 
6 doz. lots and ver of the above extra dis. 
10 pc. 



Lever Handle Stops and Wa te, disc mot 

60 p o. With, in lott of 2 doz. and over, 

an extra dis. of 10 p.c. 
'J.M.T.'' Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 55 d.o. 
Standard Glooe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 6i p.c. 
"J.M T." Radiator Valves dis. 55 p c. 
Standard " " dis., 1 5 p.c. 

Patent Uuick Opening Valves, dis. 70 p.c. 
No. 1 compression bath cock, nt t . . 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 vo 

No. 4%. " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, perdoz 15 00 

P«teni Compression Cushion, bath 

ccck No. 2208 2 25 

Square head I ri.ss cocks, f0 p.c. 

" " iron " 60 p.c. 
Compeition Gloie, Angle and Chec'i Valves 

discount, 50 p. c. 
Competition Quick Opening Rad'ator Valves, 

discount, 70 p.c. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount 2.% per ce-t. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, perdoz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Tanadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canaoian pitch. r spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conducti ra's ' 9 00 15 00 

Tiuners', solid ptr set 00 72 

" hollow p r inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS. Net. 

Dominion, 30 gal 575 

Dominion, 35 " .... 6 75 

40 " ; ... 7 J5 

Rona'd's Galvanized, 3' gallons .... 6 50 
35 " .... 7 60 
W " .... 8 50 

Copner, 3^ gallons :0 U0 

' 35 " 23 20 

40 " 26 40 

RAKES. 
Wood, per d07.net no 

RAZORS. 
„,.. perdoz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 Ot 

Geo. Butltr tnjo. B 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 1 1 00 

King Cutter 12 5J 5o 00 

Wade * Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile 4 Quack's inn 12 00 

Bailey's 6 00 12 00 

Carbo Magnetic Razor j5 00 

Griffon Berbers' Favoiite 10 7 i 

Griffon No. 65 13 

Griffon Safety Razor- 1 50 

" Stropping Machines 13 50 

All other razjrs 50 r-e. off catalogue price. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AND BURKC 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb.cartonp, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets within nil proporl ion burrs, 45 

p. c. die. cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, 30 and p.c. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivetp, 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SET!-. 
Canadian, dip. 35 to 37% percent. 
KG 1*1-, ETC. 

Sisal 12% 

Pure Manilla )5 

"British" Manilla 13 

Coitor, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

" %inch 22 

Russia DeepSea 15 

Jute .._. S 

Lath Yarn 11 



Sisal bed cord, 48 ft per d. z 65 

" " 60 f " go 

72 ft " 95 

KULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 55 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, diB. 37% co 40 p.c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 70 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B 4 A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 
Gariet(Rurton's),5 to 10 p.c. advance on list 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. 9 50 

SAWS. 
Sand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. 4 D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston'r, per ft.. 35 55 
S. 4 D. , dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 aud 3 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

frame only 075 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per luO lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, 1 75 2 00 

SASH CORD. 
P»rll 23 

SAW SETS. 
Lincoln an 1 Wh ting, per do7. .. 4 75 

HandSeiP, No. 1 Woodya't (Morrill) 4 25 
X-iutS t»,No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 so 

SfALKR, 
Burrow, Stewart 4 Mi ne— 

Imperial standard, -lOptrc nt. 
Wtigh Beanie, 35 per c nt. 
Ci ampi n Scales, 55 per cen 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
Dominion, 55 p.o. 
Richelieu, 55 p.c. 
Waireu's n- w Standi rd 40 p c. 
Champion 55 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz 65 1 00 

SCREW!-. 
Wood.F.H , orightand8teeJ,!>7%ai 1 dl0r.c 
Wo ," d £' &-V diB - 8 2V S and 10 p.o. 
... . .' ,l -. brass dis. 80 and 10 p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
F.H., bronze, diB. 75p.c. 
*-H. » 70 r-". 

Drive Screwp, 87 1 /? and 10 peicenl. 

Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

'f"n. " 4 25 5 00 

Set, Case hardei ed, 60 per cent 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Car, 45 per cen . 

SCYTHE.' . 

Per do?., let 5 00 8 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Cauadiar, dip. 45 p.c. 

SHKARI-. 
Bailey Cu lery Co full nickeled, dis. 60 and 

2% p.". 
Bailey Cutlery Japan handles, 67>/ 2 p.c. 
seyuiuur'p, Uis. 5u and lu p.c . 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dip. 40 and 5 per ceui 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discoui t 45 per cent 

SNAPS. 
HarneBP, Germar, dip . 26 p.r . 

Lock, Andrews' 450 1150 

SULDKRIMi IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQliAREb. 

Iron, No. 493, perd07 2 40 2 55 

Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, di?. 60 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
S'lAMfED WARE. 
Plair, dis., 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retiuned, dip., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 25 3 50 

Plain 2 90 8 15 

Coopers', discount 45 percent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 



40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



—TO IMPORT. 



il l W il i 

Prompt Deliveries 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BEST GLASS °' a " kinds, our own manufacture. Closest 



noes. 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



Warerooms and Offices— 135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.o. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

" Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 2 in, 40 to 200 lb.per ton 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " .... 28 00 
Grind, under 2 in. thick " .... 29 00 
STOVE PIPES. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4— 3 dozen in case.net cash .... $4 80 
No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 
TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 & 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... .85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 15 

T ' " tinned 80 & 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only ..80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80*10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk.... 85, 12% 4 12% 
" brush, blued & tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 & 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 5'2% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 



Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" "in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

" " " bulk 40 

Shoe nails 60 

Clineh and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 
Bailey's, dis. 25 p.c. 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. & N,, P. S. * W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D. , discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 19 

" " 4-ply 23 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brook's o 12% 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 450 9 00 



ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge $2 60 

10 " 6c. extra. 

11 " 12c. " 

12 " 20c. " 

13 " 30o. " 

14 " 40c. " 

15 " 55c. " 

16 " 70c. " 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning 
Extras net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c. 1 

spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c, 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 15c. 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in 
casks or cases 15c, bagging and papering 
10c, 50 and 1001b. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. 
bundles 15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 
1-lb. hanks 50c, in %-lb. hanks 75c, in %-lb. 

anks$l. 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 22% per cent 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No.l8, $5.50-No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7-No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65-No. 24, $8-No. 25, $9-No. 26 
$9.50— No. 27, $10— No. 28, $11 No. 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13— No.31,$14-No. 32 $15, 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nob. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil, 
ing, 10c. — in 25-lb. bundles, 15c. —in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 



Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off tt e 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and lOperoent. net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7,8, $3.50 
to $3.85— No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10, 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10-No. 
12, $3 to $3.30— No. 13, $3.10 to $3.40— 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50— No. 15, $4.60 to 
$5.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5.35. Base sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52% f.o.b. Cleveland. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18, $2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hol- 
low 6 strand, No. 17, $4.30; No. 18. $2.70, 
No. 19, $2.35; No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamil 
ton, Toronto Montreal 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 00 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77% 

in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 

WIRE CLOTH 

Painted Soreen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. 1 37% 

Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 6 

White 8 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.o 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. k K.'s Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " ... 24 00 

Royal American., " .... 24 00 

Sampson " .... 24 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 




ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 

"Pullman" 

Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No. 14. 

Pullman Sash Bal. Co. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 






♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



ALL 
TOOLS 



STEVENS 

X -AR 

\ STANDARD FOR QUALITY. \ 

f Your stock is not complete without a full line of our Kifles, Shotguns, Pistols, Tools ♦ 

X and Victor Bicycles. 1 

♦ Handled by the Leading Jobbers. + 

I J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p °2i7 OX Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. t 
♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 



ARE- 



6ELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, ete. 




•CKHOWLEDBED THE BEIT 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



NEW YORK OFFICE. Q« Chuktrilt 
NEWARK, N.J.. U.S.A. 



ONTARIO 

NUT WORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Sauare and Hexagon. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 

"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn " 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Emlyn Engineering Works, 
Newport, Mon. , England. 



Cables- 
Machinery," Newport. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

„ , . t FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 




WRIGHT'S 

Insect 
Sprayers 

PLAIN TIN, 

LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 



'BEST ON EARTH." 



Manufactured by 

E. T.WRIGHT SCO. 

HAMILTON, ONT., and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

J. H. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



WHERE 



OUR LARGE NEW FACTORY 

MMAP ' l Mb ...;.'jaA-\. « *»^sfc 




Shears, Scissors, 
Razors, Butcher 
Knives and other 
Cutlery are made 
by 

BAILEY CUTLERY 

CO,, Limited 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 

Write for catalogue and prices. 



CHAS. P. CLARK, President. 



JAREO CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, 31,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New Tork City, U.S.A. 

THE BRAD8TREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and the 
controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information, no effort is spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify Its claim as an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial aflairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and it 
furnishes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fidaclary and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen. Man. Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON, Gen. Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1825. 75 YEARS 



u 



Syracuse Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 



For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 

Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 
Canadian Works, Montreal, P.O. ^^ — ^ ■ a ■ ._'. _ 

K:mr.?tt:h%vVr;iHi M 4 **„«.*„,.*. Syracuse Smelting Works 




ICE CREAM 



FREEZERS 



~ TONGS ' 

*- S « AY ERS *- 
£ PIOKS £ 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Write for Catalogue and Prices. .a^^^TORON 



Canada Plates. 

Ordinary All Bright 

18x21 x 60 Sheets 18x21 x 60 Sheets 

1 8 x 24 x 52 " 1 8 x 24 x 52 



n 



1 8 x 24 x 60 
18x24x75 
20 x 28 x 40 



'S 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

27 Wellington St. West, -^.TORONTO, ONT. 

English House : SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 164 Fenchurch St., LONDON, E.C. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THEYRE ALL ALIKE 



THAT'S THE BEAUTY OF THE 




GARDEN HOSE 



No 
Saw Edges 

No Soft Spots 

No Temper Streaks 

No Returned Blades 
to the Dealer 

Will Shave for Years 
Without Requiring Honing 

Sold by all Leading Jobbers, 



Firm of 



BOOKLET 

COMING- 

if you'll ask for 
a copy with 
trade discount. 



A. L. SILBERSTEIN 



Mfrs. of %2^ 



Cutlery 



453=461 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY. 



Seamless Tube 

LAPPEO TUBElS Pp 



SEAMLESS TUBE 




8 



&>;/% 




All brands of our GARDEN HOSE are 

made with our 

Patent Seamless Tube 



WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 

MONTREAL TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 



"YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
MSI5 





Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30. "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 11. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

tee Chipper s. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 50. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver, 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



See I You Don't 

Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 




Nol5 




No. 14 



tin""" puucn J [ self PULLING _J 



110.17 



NO. 16 



Walker's Self=Pullinp; Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Apple Wood Handles. 
EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several Imitations on the market, but none as good. 

Mfrd. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



PAINTS 



We manufacuire 
these brands : — 
LION," "PEERLESS," "OWL," 
" RAVEN," also Ready-mixed 
House and Floor 
Paints, Roof, Barn, 
Bridge and Brick 
Paints, Coach Colors. 
Varnishes, Japans, 
etc. Ourprices will in- 
terest you. Write us, 
The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont. 




Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 
than the .... 
BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light- 

The saving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold 

8®- Order director through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 

The Best Ready Roofing on Earth. 




TRINIDAD ASPHALT MFG. GO. 

Aspbalt and Asbestine Gravelled 
READY D 00FIN6 

WITH INTERLOCKING LAP. 

Fire, water, acid or gas proof. 
Shipped with cement and nails for laying. 

ASPHALT. PAINT, CEMENT, COATING, ROOF- 
ING, DEADENING and SLATERS' FELT. BUILD- 
ING and INSULATING PAPER of all kinds. The 
trade supplied. Prices and samples from the 

Canada Supply Co,, Agents, Windsor, Ont, 



STOVE BRICK 

FIRECLAY AND ASBESTOS 
FURNACE CEMET 

all kinds of File Clay Products made to order from 
patterns. Write us for varieties and prices. 

JONES BROS., Bracondale, P.O., Ont. 

(near Toronto.) 

WILLIAM ABBOTT, Agent, 

Representing Manufacturers, 

Steel Beams, Channels, Angles, etc. 
Bar Iron and Steel, Plates, Tubes, etc. 
Brass and Copper Rods, Sheets, Pipes. 

CAST STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES. 
13 St. John Street, -^■« — MONTREAL. 




JVohles & Hoarc 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers 01 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



BISHOP & CO. 



Established 
I8S0. 



27 and 28 Little Trinity Lane, 



LONDON, ENG. 



54 Scotland St., SHEFFIELD 

Table Cutlery, all qualities. 



23 Vittoria St., BIRMINGHAM 

Wrought Steel Pots, round or oval. 



Samples on view at the following Agencies :— 

Alex. Thurber, 446 St. Paul St., 

E. Fielding, 34 Yonge St., 

E. L. Denoncourt, 74 St. Joseph St., 



Tinned inside or enamelled. 

MONTREAL. 

TORONTO. 

QUEBEC. 



WIRE ROPE 



Wire Rope. 



OF. 




All Kinds and Sizes 

AND FOR 

All Purposes. 

PRICES RIGHT. PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 

The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 

BLACK BEAUTY LEATHER DRESSING. 



<v 



An absolute black, free from acid. Will not rot stitches, but preserves 
the leather. Renews color and life of a harness, no matter how old, red 
and stiff. Weather and water proof. 

Ask your dealer for it. If he has none in stock ask us for sample and price. 

We are sole agents for Canada. 

The Zanzibar Paint Co., Limited, - Toronto, Can, 



K?j CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 





9n* 



Stanley Roofing Brackets 
The pressure increases its stability. 



BUILDERS' 

and CONTRACTORS' 
SUPPLIES 




No. 162— Sheet Metal Brick Hod. 

No. 158— Sheet Metal Mortar Hod. 

Will outlast 10 of the ordinary wooden hods 



No. 162. 



No. 35 
Mason 



19 \902 




^^TUBMBP 



No. 158. 




1 19 \W 



I 



.1 



■ 

mill 



■ : 'II 




STONE 
SLEDGES 



MASONS' 
HAMMERS 



STONE 
HAMMERS 



BUSH 
HAMMERS 



CROW 
BARS 




MAIL ORDERS 
FILLED WITH 
DESPATCH. 



is 
pill 
pill 

in 

iiii 

ill 

iiii 

in 

in 

iiii 

■ 

hi 

iiii 

in 

lli 

mi 
ill 
Iiii 

: 111 

lli 



Disston's and Rose's Brick Trowels, all sizes, in London and Philadelphia patter 



All 








Boring Machines, the 
leading makes. 



No. 4 -Tubular, Steel Tray Wheelbarrows, capacity 
7 cubic feet. 



COIL 
CHAIN 



BRICKLAYERS' 
HAMMERS 



TIMBER 
GRIPS 



STONECUTTERS' 
HAND HAMMERS 



TACKLE BLOCKS, 
HOISTS 



Lewis Bros, e* Co- 



HEAVY 
ROPE 



TORONTO, 

87 YORK ST. 



MONTREAL. 



OTTAWA, 

54 QUEEN ST. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 






HRS&C 

Manufacturers of the Celebrated 

TINPLATES, "Rogers" Cokes. 

"H. R.S.& CO'S " Charcoals. 
CANADA PLATES, "H. R. S. & CO." 
UNION JACK GALVANIZED IRON. 

Canadian Office : 

6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TINWARE AND TIN CANS 

x Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
Jacketed Oil Cans, 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Pails, Etc. 

JAS. A. McGOLPIN 

156=162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



THE 



DANDY SHINER 

(nickel plated) 
A HOUSEHOLD NECESSITY 




Holds shoe rigid. Fits any shoe. 3 lasts (men's, 
women's, child's) go with each shiner. 

Write for wholesale price to 

L. H. Packard & Co., Montreal. 



WATERBURY 
E « d BRASS CO. 

Main Office and Mills at Waterbury, Conn. 

New York Store, No. 122 to No. 130 Centre St. 

Providence Store, No. 131 Dorrance St. and 

No. 152 Eddy St. 

Pope's Island "White"' 

and 

"Gold Non-Coirosive Metal" 

Suitable for Spinning, Drawing, Stamp- 
ing and Jewelers' Work. 

Brass, German Silver, Bronze and 
Copper in Sheets, Wire Rods, Brazed 
and Seamless Tubing. Metallic Eyelets, 
Shells, Ferrules and small brass wares 
of every description. 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited. 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan - American Exposition. 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

ROPE, Lath Ya s hi IY Hide BINDER TW INE 

* Cord, Pulp Cord, Clothes Lines — ^ _ ___ 




SISAL 
MANILA 



Transmission Rope a Specialty. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 



ST. MARYS, 0NT„ CANADA. 



44 Maxwell Favorite Churn " Lawn Mowers, ffinfiir: 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improv- 
ed for season of igo2. Steel or Wood Frame 
as desired. 



widths. 



Wheels. 

) 20 in, 

Cold Rolled 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different Sizes. 



Steel Frame Churn 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inoh Low Wheel. 



Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 



THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




rthur. Cofoeille & Co. 



MONTREAL 

Manufacturers and Importers of . . . 




White Lead, 

Oils and Colors, 

Prepared Paints, 
Window Glass, 

Varnishes, etc. 

Glue and 

Gelatine 

in extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

ENGLISH VARNISHES 

of CHAS TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing. 



THE 



NATIONAL 



WOOD 
FURNACES 



Made 
in 

three 
sizes 



Nos. 32, 
42 
and 52. 



BY- 




The OTTAWA FURNACE & FOUNDRY C0.,Limit e d 



STOVES 
STEEL RANGES 



OTTAWA, ONT. 



IIO I WATER BOILERS 
HOI AIR ELJRNACES 




DARKNESS into LIGHT. 



If you suffer from want 
of Light . . . 

■— Consult Us. 

We have made a study of lighting dark places, and 
are in a position to give you valuable information. 



CALL AND SEE 
THE DIFFERENCE 



OUR GOODS THE BEST IMPROVEMENT 
FOR RUSINESS PREMISES. 



Luxfer Prism Co., Limited 

10O King Street West, Toronto. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Best Selling 
Range Ever Made. 

Popular with dealers in every part of the country be- 
cause it is so enthusiastically praised by every buyer. 

Our Imperial Oxford 



has won its laurels — it is the favorite range of Canada 
— widely advertised and everywhere appreciated for 
its practical superiority. 

Are you familiar with its 
Diffusive Flue Construction 
Front Draw=Out Grate 
Draw=Out Oven Rack 

and other talking points 



•> 



If there's any range business in your locality you'll 
get it by^handling the Imperial Oxford. Fullest details 
if you write 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO,, Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 




THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 




<£ Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, • 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 

Park Row Building. 



- 42 Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 



m^& cm os 



#" 



y C® S3 1^(511 Oil (§J feigB. 
■^ LIMITED. 

Cold Pressed Nuts 

OF ALL SHAPES AND SIZES. 

Semi-Finished Polished 

Finished Plated 

Case Hardened 

Cap Screws Set Screws 

Coupling Bolts, etc. 

SEND FOR PRICE LIST 1001. 

Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 

Head Office and Works, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Officii 

Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, 

Vancouver, Victoria, Rossland. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES 



Manila Rope 


Lathyarn 


Sisal Rope 


Shlngleyarn 


Jute Rope 


Bale Rope 


Russian Rope 


Lariat Rope 


Marline 


Hemp Packing 


Housellne 


Italian Packing 


Hambrollne 


Jute Packing 


Clotheslines 


Drilling Cablet 


Tarred Hemp Rope 


Spunyarn 


White Hemp Rope 


Pulp Cord 


Bolt Rope 


Lobster Marlln 


Hide Rope 


Paper Cord 


Halyards 


Cheese Cord 


Deep Seallne 


Hay Rope 


Ratline 


Fish Cord 


Plow Lines 


Sand Lines 


"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope 


from the finest quality Manll 


hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 




CONSUMERS GORDAC 


IE COMPANY 







wh. b. stew.rt. MONTREAL, QUE. 

MR 17 Front St. Wast, TORONTO. 



BUY TilE 



BEST PAINTS 

AND SAVE YOUR HONEY. 

It is always cheaper to buy the best. It costs as much to 
apply a cheap as it does a good Paint. 

"BEAVER" BRAND 

and 

' T. L & C. CO." BRAND 



PURE 

PREPARED 

PAINTS 



riANUFACTURED BY 



THE TORONTO LEAD & COLOR CO., 



ARI 



TORONTO 
THE E 



Limited 



For interior and exterior use. Most economical, because 
they cover the greatest surface. Cheapest, because they wear 
longest. Most satisfactory, because they look best. 

EVERY TIN GUARANTEED. 

As for our New Century Catalogue and Color Cards 



THE 




TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS' 
'f, ROPERIE 



M 



LEITH 



ESTABLISHED 1750 



SCOTLAN D 



Steamer 

CLOTH 
E, 

4» AND <k 
SAILCLOTH'S) 
WCOMPANYfJ 
V LEITH <$■ 
>7SO 



0F ACI 1"1ER S 

Cordage 



MANILA ROPE 

SISAL ROPE 

NEW ZEALAND ROPE 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHING LINES 

NETTINC TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS&PACKINCS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS 




EVERY -rinN 

DE sCK of 

& Canvas 



1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAULINCS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPINC TWINES 



BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



I 

EDINBURGH 
IjWVTERPROO" 



F^? AND <£ 
wSAIl CLOTH % 
tJCOMPANYC* 

\% LEITH ^ 
/I^O 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE AND STORES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 





LOCkS and 

Builders' Hardware. 

We have a most complete line of all these goods, including the 
very newest ideas in 

Bronze and Brass Knobs, 

Door Sets and Escutcheons. 

LOCKS AND LATCHES OF ALL KINDS. 

Any dealer asking for a catalogue will be sent full prices, discount sheets, etc., etc. Drop a card. 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 



tttjjtt* 



INCORPORATED 1893. 



The Gurney-Tilden Co*, Lm,ted 

Hamilton. Toronto. Montreal. 



AGENCIES :— ST. JOMN, N. B., VANCOUVER, B. C. 



FOR PRESERVING TIME 



Kemp's 
Enameled 
Preserving 
Kettles 




10 SIZES, 3 TO 30 QUARTS, 
flanufactured in three popular grades 

DIAMOND 

PEARL 

GRANITE 

How is your stock ? You should not be short at this time of 
the year. We are prepared to supply your requirements 
promptly on receipt of order. 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO. 

TORONTO, CAN. 



INDELIBLO 




COLD WATER PAINT 

You buy it in a dry powder, there is no mess about it and 
no smell. It is milled as fine as flour. It is easily 
mixed with cold water. The color costs a little, water 
is free. You can get it in any quantity you want. It is 
the only genuine satisfactory cold water paint yet dis- 
covered. It is sold all over the world. Made in different 
colors, besides white. Ask for color cards, prices and 
information. 

Agents : 

A. RAMSAY £» SON, ... MONTREAL 

J. tl. AStlDOWN, .... WINNIPEG 

Mclennan, mcpeely £> co., - - Vancouver 




VOL XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. AUGUST 2, 1902. 



NO. 31. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES. 

Montreal ... 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

Toronto - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

London, Eng. - - iog Fleet Street, EC. 

W. H, Miln. 
Manchester, Eng. - - 18 St. Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 
Winnipeg - Western Canada Block. 

J. J. Roberts. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. - - - Flack Block. 

J. A. Macdonald. 
St. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
New YoRk - Room 443 New York Life Bldg. 
Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 

„ , . ... [Adscript, London. 

Cable Address j Ad .^ Canada _ 



• WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



DOMINION COAL AND STEEL. 

THE Dominion Coal Co. and The 
Dominion Iron and Steel Co. have 
certainly a bright outlook, to judge 
by the strides already made, and the de- 
mand with which the products of each of 
these companies meets with. According to 
the president of the two companies, Mr. 
James Ross, the net earnings of the coai 
company for March, April, May and June, 
the first four months of the fiscal year, 
showed an increase of $300, 000 over the 
earnings for the same period in 1901. Only 
the last two of these months were in the sea- 
son of St. Lawrence River navigation, and 
July, he thought, would show an output of 



300,000 tons or more. He stated that this 
year there would be over 1 ,000,000 tons of 
coal sent up the St. Lawrence against 850,- 
000 in 1901. 

As to The Dominion Iron and Steel Co., 
Mr. Ross said that they could sell three 
times as much as they could produce at 
present. The company was rapidly getting 
in shape to produce the full output of the 
plant, 30,000 tons per month. The steel, 
too. was of the first quality, and never had a 
customer made a complaint. The chief 
point was to get down the cost of the raw 
material for manufacturing steel, as from 
four to five tons of the various materials 
were required to produce one ton of steel. 
Along this road the company is proceeding 
rapidly, as in June, 1902, they managed to 
have all the ore delivered at Sydney at 35 
or 40 per cent, less cost than last year. He 
expected that the cost could be brought 
down materially lower than this, which was 
under $1 per ton. 

The company has secured a number of 
options on ore bodies, and is spending a 
good deal of money in testing and develop- 
ing such, as it is their policy to secure all 
the iron ore possible in Canada. The three 
buildings for the rail mill have been practi- 
cally completed and the machinery will 
shortly be installed. 

Mr. Ross spoke of the ever-increasing 
market for steel, and the number of new 
industries springing up in which steel was 
the principal material used. If such corpo- 
rations of good financial standing were 
wanting in this country the company would 
build other mills themselves. 



The man who loafs would die were it not 
that someone always has a loaf to spare. 



HELP THE FARMERS. 

ULTIMATELY the success of the mer- 
chant depends on the success of the 
farmer. A merchant's good times 
come around when the farmer comes to 
town on market-day with a good fat purse. 
Retailers in country towns all know this, 
and realize that in the farmer is to be found 
their best customer. 

Under the circumstances it will be to the 
merchant's best interest to keep the farmer 
well posted on those matters of public 
importance which will tend to increase his 
prosperity. For instance, a pamphlet has 
just been published by Mr. J. G. Rutherford 
concerning the breeding in Canada of 
horses for army use, which contains matter 
of vital interest to the farmer. In this 
document Mr. Rutherford points out that 
the South African campaign has demon- 
strated the necessity for equipping the army 
with serviceable mounts. Such an equip- 
ment to day has become imperative in 
every army with any pretence of being 
modern. 

Canada, which would naturally be ex- 
pected to supply any number of suitable 
horses, has been found strangely lacking in 
this respect. It is not an easy matter at 
present to obtain in this country any large 
number of horses altogether suitable for 
army use. This lack is due to the want of 
encouragement shown to breeders and the 
absence of a demand for such horses. To- 
day there is a demand and there should be 
an encouragement. Therefore, in self- 
interest, our merchants ought to direct their 
country customers' attention to the new de- 
mand. Very little extra effort or expense 
will be required to increase the present 
small supply enormously. Instead of rearing 
light horses and ponies, which are of but 
little value, breeders might just as well raise 
animals better suited to military service. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



EXPORT DUTY ON NEWFOUNDLAND IRON ORE. 



A REPRESENTATIVE of Hardware 
and Metal in London, England, 
reports as follows : "I have just 
been informed by one of the Canadian 
Ministers now in London that during one of 
the conferences between the Colonial Pre- 
miers, Sir Robert Bond, the Newfoundland 
Premier, remarked that his Government 
intended placing an export duty on iron ore. 
•Sir Robert holds,' said the Canadian 
Minister, * that the Island is getting very 
little benefit from its enormous beds of iron 
ore, and that as the Dominion Iron and 
Steel Co. bought the mines at a compara- 
tively low figure and is mining the ore at a 
very low cost, it can afford to pay a moder- 
ate export duty.' " 

This is all the information our correspon- 
dent furnishes, but it is enough to indicate 
that the Newfoundland Government pro- 
poses to do what it has been for some time 
expected to do. 

About six or seven months ago The Even- 
ing Herald of St. John's, Newfoundland, 
started an agitation in favor of the imposi- 
tion of an export duty of 25c. per ton on 
iron ore. The Herald is generally under- 
stood to be in the confidence of the Gov- 
ernment, and it is possible our contempor- 
ary was feeling the way. At any rate, the 
proposition appeared at the time to meet 
with a great deal of favor, and it is possible 
the Government has been influenced by 
public opinion in the matter. 

The iron deposits of Newfoundland which 
have become so famous of late years are on 
Bell Island, about 35 miles from St. John's. 
The ore beds consist of small regular blocks 
of red hematite, which are piled one upon 
another to an average depth of about 8 ft., 
and extending over an area of nearly 1,000 
acres. The quantity of ore within this area 
is estimated to be nearly 40,000,000 tons. 
The cost of mining the ore and placing it 
on board ship is estimated at 25 to 30c. per 
ton. Both The Nova Scotia Steel and Coal 
Co. and The Dominion Iron and Coal Co. 
draw the greater proportion of their sup- 
plies from the Bell Island deposits. The 
mines were at one time owned by the former 
company, but the latter secured an interest 
two or more years ago for which it paid 



about $1,250,000. In the area purchased 
by Tbe Dominion Iron and Coal Co. there 
are estimated to be 28,000.000 tons of ore. 
According to the trade and navigation 
returns of the Dominion the imports of ore 
from Newfoundland during the fiscal year 
1 90 1 were about 520,000 cwt., the value 
of which was $165,000. A tax of 25c. on 
this amount would, of course, greatly add 
to the cost of the ore. While this would be 
regretted the iron and steel manufacturers 
of Cape Breton would still have cheaper 
ore than any of their competitors on this 
continent. 



LOCAL INTERESTS AND THE 
ATLANTIC SERVICE. 

IT is to be hoped that local jealousy will 
not be sufficiently strong to prevent the 
realization of a fast Atlantic service be- 
tween Canada and Great Britain. 

For ten years scarcely any question has 
been more largely in the public mind than 
the necessity of a fast Atlantic service. 
There have been times when it has been 
relegated to the background or eclipsed for 
the time being by some other question, but 
it has again and again come to the front ; 
and it will continue to do so until it has been 
dealt with in a way that the necessities of 
the case demand. 

Among the various problems which are 
to-day demanding solution that regarding 
transportation transcends all others. The 
tariff is important. Imperial trade is im- 
portant. But unless we have efficient 
transportation facilities the trade and com- 
merce of the country must labor under 
disabilities no matter how favorable the 
conditions may be in other particulars. 
And the fast Atlantic service is at least one 
of the pivotal points of the transportation 
problem. 

On some of the questions before the 
public it would be practically impos- 
sible for the business men to unite, 
because of the political atmosphere 
which surrounds them. But there is 
no political atmosphere around the trans- 
portation question. As fir as the Atlantic 
service is concerned there is no doubt in it 
a mixture of sentiment, particularly since 
the Morgan merger startled the British 



world, but the sum and substance of the 
matter is, after all, business. It therefore 
demands tbe attention — the careful 
attention — of business men. If they cannot 
solve it in a satisfactory manner no one 
can. To leave it to the politicians would 
be idle. And yet there is danger of busi- 
ness men delaying solution of the question 
by viewing it from a local or provincial and 
not from a national standpoint. 

What we want to keep before our mind 
is not the particular interests of Montreal or 
Quebec or of Halifax or St. John. The 
paramount interest to consider is that of the 
Dominion. And the more we allow that 
interest to overshadow all others the more 
easily will the question be settled. 



MISMANAGED COUNCILS. 

MISMANAGEMENT of the city's 
affairs is even a more than usually 
fashionable subject for discussion 
in Toronto at present. It is asserted that 
the affairs of the city are not run in a business- 
like way. No doubt this is quite true. And 
the cause is not far to seek : It is the lack 
of practical business men in the council. 

If the ward heeler is the predominating 
influence in the council, the citizens cannot 
expect anything else but mismanagement. 
Like begets like. 

We are quite aware that the self-respect- 
ing business man has very little to encour- 
age him to enter public life through the door 
of the municipal council in Toronto or any 
other city. Influences without number are 
brought to bear against him the moment he 
steps into the arena. But these influences, 
even if in the beginning they defeat him, 
cannot finally do so. Next to fitness the 
essential to success is persistency. 

Business men are gradually awakening, 
and it is to be hoped that when the next 
municipal elections come around they will 
be wider awake than ever before, not only 
in Toronto, but in every Canadian city as 
well. 

Some attention to this matter might, with., 
profit, be given by such organizations as 
the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 
the Retail Merchants' Association, the 
Maritime Board of Trade and the Master 
Plumbers' Association when they meet in 
annual convention in the course of the next 
month or two. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



TALES OF TRAVELLERS FROM THE EAST. 



MR. J. F. JUNK1N, managing direc- 
tor of The Manufacturers' Life 
Insurance Company, who has 
just returned via the Empress Line from 
Japan and other points East, was asked 
the question : "Is there any opening for 
^Canadian enterprise in China and 
Japan ? " 

Said Mr. Junkin : " Yes, there should 
be a large and continually growing mar- 
ket for Canadian , flour, lumber, beef, and 
other products, as well as for many lines 
of manufactured articles, such as elec- 
trical appliances, machinery, etc. Japan 
has made more progress during the last 
30 years than any other nation has done 
in centuries, and electric light, bicycles, 
and other modern conveniences are com- 
ing into general use, even in the interior. 
The Anglo- Japan alliance will be strong 
enough to protect China from the 
European nations who have been acting 
towards China like a pack of ravenous 
wolves. There will be no more partition 
or grabbing of territory, and China will 
soon learn to confide in the good inten- 
tions of the allies, who will then be able 
to lead her out into more enlightened 
and progressive ways. Once thoroughly 
awakened and enlightened under some 
coming leader, she will startle the 
nations. The Chinese have a great deal 
of latent energy, and the business men 
are honorable in their dealings." 

Mr. Junkin also stated : " India, for 
want of water, consequent on deforesta- 
tion, seems to be in a state of partial or 
total famine almost all the time, espe- 
cially in districts without irrigation. 
Canadians should take a lesson and pre- 
serve their forests, and wherever they 
have ruthlessly destroyed them, as in 
many parts of Ontario, they should do a 
certain amount of replanting each year. 
In Japan, where they are almost nature 
worshippers, they long ago began re- 
forestation, and have now many beauti- 
ful forests of cryptomena, pine, camphor, 
maple and other line trees. Not a twig 
is wantonly sacrificed, with the result 
that the whole country is like a garden. 
Water is plentiful everywhere, and their 
forests are a perpetual source of 
wealth." 

Mr. W. C. Matthews, Canadian general 
manager for E. G. Dun & Co., has also 
just returned from an extended trip to 
the Orient. When interviewed, Mr. Mat 
thews stated : " The Philippines are very 
rich in natural wealth, agriculture, min- 
erals and forests. 

This wealth can only he reached by 
the development that comes through 
manual labor, and by the suicidal policy 
of the United States Government in ap- 
plying the Chinese Exclusion Act to the 
Philippines they have shut out the only 
class of people able and willing to do the 
work — the Chinese coolies. The country 
will never be developed by the Filipinos, 
as they are idle and uncertain, incapable 
of any sustained physical effort, and un- 
willing to work more than to supply 
their bodily wants, which are few and 
easily met." 

When asked as to the possibilities for 
trade, Mr. Matthews said that there was 



practically no chance for Canadian trade 
with the Philippines. Flour was about 
the only article that could be sold, and 
the long and expensive haul before ship- 
ment made competition with the Oregon 
and Washington product impossible. 

There is a great deal of building going 
on in Hong Kong, with an active de- 
mand for structural steel and other 
building material that could be supplied 
by Canada if a steel plant was in opera- 
tion on the Pacific Coast. 

" All the foreign trade in Hong Kong, 
both import and export," he continued, 
" is in the hands of Europeans and Amer- 
icans, with Great Britain well in the lead. 
The distributing trade is done exclusively 
by the Chinese, who are natural born 
traders, shrewd and keen, but generally 
very reliable. Their simple word is 
taken, for transactions involving large 
sums of money, and they very rarely 
break faith." 

Of Shanghai, where British, German, 
and United States merchants compete, 
the former still doing the bulk of the 
trade, Mr. Matthews spoke with enthus- 
iasm. Of the Chinese he said that they 
are a much higher type of men than is 
generally supposed in Canada, where we 
practically only see the coolie class ; they 
are born merchants, cool, clear-headed 
and able, and in a business transaction 
can hold their own with any nationality 
under the sun." 

" China," said Mr. Matthews, " was 
suffering from the low value of silver, the 
currency of the country being on a silver 
basis. The indemnity of 450 million 
taels due other nations was due in gold, 
and with silver at its present price, this 
meant adding 150 million taels to the 
present indebtedness, which was a very 
serious thing for even a rich country like 
China." 

Mr. Matthews replied in the negative to 
the question : " Is Canada doing as much 
business in China as she could ? 

" The country is an enormous buyer 
of flour, which comes almost entirely 
from the United States, mainly from the 
same causes as in the Philippines, and 
because it is cheaper, though poorer. A 
trade could be got by Canada, and while 
it would cost something to do it, the 
market would be sure when once cap- 
tured, as it is difficult to get a China- 
man to change when once satisfied. There 
is a great deal of lead used, and with the 
Government bounty now in force she 
should now get her share of this mar- 
ket. Lumber can also be sold in much 
larger quantities if transportation facili- 
ties are improved." 

" Commercially, Japan has been mak- 
ing enormous strides," said Mr. Mat- 
thews. " In 1891 their total foreign 
trade, both export and import, was 142,- 
454,540 yen ; in 1901 it reached 508,166,- 
187 yen, an average growth per year of 
36,571,(547 yen. During the four years of 
1897 to 1901 the tonnage of Japanese 
vessels increased 2,287,706 tons, bringing 
it up to a total of 3,861,659 tons, while 
Great Britain has 4,080,583 tons and 
Germany 1,192,153. 

" Their motto is evidently ' Japan for 
. the Japanese,' " said Mr. Matthews, "and 
while they made use of foreigners in 
starting their railways, telegraphs, etc., 
they have now dispensed with them en- 
tirely, and everything is done by their 



own people. There is a chance for Can- 
ada to increase her trade in timber, lum- 
ber, flour, fish and lead, but it will have 
to be gone about systematically, and 
may require the expenditure of some 
time and money before satisfactory re- 
turns are reached ; but the field is a good 
one and the business worth workine 
lor." 

Mr. Matthews stated that wherever he 
went in the Orient Canada was a frequent 
source of conversation. The contingents 
to the South-African War had advertised 
the country greatly, and created a warm 
felling for us among the other colonics." 



CONTRACTS FOR A WINNIPEG 
SCHOOL. 

On July 21 tenders for the erection of 
a new public school on the corner of 
Edmonton and St. Mary's streets, Winni- 
peg, were awarded at a meeting of the 
public school board. Contracts were en- 
tered into with the following contract- 
ors, (heir tenders in each case being the 
lowest : Kelly Bros., excavation, drain- 
ing, stone and brick work, cement floors, 
plastering, §16,900; John McLeod, car- 
penter and joiner work, $11,845; W. & 
W. ftutley Co.. heating and ventilating 
apparatus, $2,500 : James A. Payne, 
painting and glazing, $1,640; Douglas 
Bros., tin and galvanized work. $1,455; 
J. L. Wells & Co., plumbing, $446; F. 
S. Harrison, electric wiring and fixture-;. 
$285. Total, $35,071. 



THE B. C IRON INDUSTRY. 

At a meeting of the Voters' League, 
Victoria, B.C., the report of the joint 
committee, as given by Mr. Lugriri, was 
adopted, that the following- resolutions 
should be carried : (I) That the Govern- 
ment be requested to use the services of 
the Provincial Mineralogist to examine' 
and describe and sample known deposits 
of iron, and that a bulletin be published 
embodying the results ; (2) That an offi- 
cial report embodying the report of the 
special comttnittee on iron and steel arid 
all other available and reliable matter 
tending to advertise the iron and steel 
resources of the Province be compiled 
and copies forwarded to the Hon. J. H. 
Turner, and the boards of trade at the 
leading- cities in Canada and elsewhere. 



LEAD REFINING AT TRAIL, B. C. 

An unparalleled degree of purity has 
been attained in practical lead refining 
operations. At Trail the refined producl 
turned out by the new process of refining 
by electricity is no less than .999 pure. In 
addition to attaining such wonderful n 
suits with respect to the quality of the 
product, the electrical process is under 
stood to be less costly and cumbersome, 
than the chemical process ordinarily fol- 
lowed. 

The Canadian refining industry thus 
secures an initial advantage over its 
competitors, which will be timely, for 
under existing circumstances the indn 
try has many odds to compete against. 

The present production of refined lead 
at Trail is ten tons daily, and some 10 
men are employed about the refining 
plant, although the permanent force bo 
maintain production at its present stand- 
ard will not lie as large as will be the 
case as soon as a market tan be found 
for an increased production. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADA PAINT COMPANY'S ANNUAL PICNIC. 



SATURDAY, July, 26, was a red letter 
day with the employes of The Canada 
Paint Co. in Montreal. Seven car- 
loads of merry seekers pulled out of the 
Bonaventure Station, G.T.R., bound for 
Otterburn Park at St. Hilaire. 

The managing director, Robert Munro, 
owing to a peremptory engagement, was 
unable to accompany the excursionists, but 
he assisted in seeing that everyone was 
safely embarked and there was much cheer- 
ing as the train pulled out. 

The St. Gabriel Independent Brass Band 
was engaged for the day and played lively 
airs at each stopping place en route. Casey's 
Symphony Orchestra occupied the stand for 
the dancing. The music was all that could 
be desired. 

Fortune favored the picnicers in the 
matter of weather. The day was a glorious 
one, the sun shone brilliantly in its setting 
of blue sky which was just here and there 
tinged with fleecy clouds. The countryside 
and Campbell's seignory on Beloeil moun- 
tain never looked better. A gentle breeze 
played upon the temples of the gay throng 
and served to keep everyone in good humor. 
The air was vocal with the songs of birds 
and the laughter of children, who, in their 
exuberance of spirits, carolled forth merrily. 
Like untiring sentinels the giant trees (their 
opulent foliage just swayed to motion by the 
gentle zephyrs), looked down upon the 
pleasure-seekers and spread a refreshing 
shade. Cattle grazed and lowed in the 
surrounding fields, the "chip," "chip," 
"chip" of the gay chipmunk was heard, 
and the picture was, indeed, an inviting one. 
Beyond, the wavelets of the Richelieu 
River were seen, and ever and anon loud 
laughter broke the pastoral stillness as the 
games proceeded — some drove, some fished 
and some watched the ball match, " Ele- 
phant " vs. "Prism." Johnny Baptiste 
was there lolling in the shady places, breath- 
ing tender words by wireless telegraphy to 
Rosali* Laflamme ; Jock O'Hazeldean and 
Flora McGillicuddy sat by the river bank 
pensive and silent as befits a Highland 
courtship. 

James Campbell, of the The Acme Can 
Works, acted as umpire, and also gave a 
fine exhibition of wrestling with Fred Thi- 
bault, catch.as-catch.can style. 

Hugh W. Aird, the popular and indefati- 
gable treasurer of The Canada Paint Co., 
also acted as umpire, and his decisions 
always gave unqualified satisfaction. 

The chemist of the Company, Dr. Kyle, 
made a capital referee for the football match, 
but alas ! as most referees do, he came out 
of the field badly battered. Dr. Kyle took 



the friction good naturedly, and invariably 
threw oil (linseed) upon the troubled waters. 

The hundred-yard dash was a brilliant 
affair, and elicited great praise from the 
spectators. Throwing the 56 lb. weight was 
a fine exhibition of skill. It was found that 
some one had purloined the weight for a 
boat anchor, and a bladder of putty was 
impressed into service in lieu of the 56-lb. 
avoirdupois. 

A large amount of work devolved upon 
the secretary, Edward Coleman, but he 
performed his duty to the entire satisfaction 
of everyone present, and was voted unani- 
mously a jolly good fellow. 

It is satisfactory to note that it was the 
most successful outing ever held by this 
company's staff, and they desire to heartily 
thank, one and all, those who so liberally 
contributed to the picnic fund. 

The programme was printed in colors, 
and was a more than usually elaborate 
thing of the kind. 

John Thompson, the superintendent, 
armed with a marshal's baton, was here, 
there and everywhere on the grounds seeing 
that the ladies were well looked after, the 
children regaled with cocoanuts, candies 
and fruit, and that each man received his 
just due. John Cox, of the printing depart- 
ment, attended to the gentlemen of the 
press, and saw that their wants were sup- 
plied. 

NEGOTIATING FOR STEAMERS. 

F. H. Clergue, of Sault Ste. Marie, 
is negotiating with President Campbell, of 
the Detroit, Belle Isle and Windsor Ferry, 
concerning the purchase of one of the 
steamers now operating at Detroit. The 
boat will, if the deal goes through, be placed 
in operation between the American and 
Canadian Soo above the rapids. The 
Clergue interests want two boats capable of 
breaking the ice, and, as the steamers of the 
Ferry Company have demonstrated that they 
can do so efficiently, one of them will pro- 
bably go to the Soo. 



HANDSOME SILVER TROPHY. 

The new Ontario Bowling Association 
trophy, to be competed for at the annual 
tournament at Niagara-on-the-Lake com- 
mencing August 10, has been awarded to 
The Toronto Silver Plate Co., Limited, 
after some keen competition. 

It is to be manufactured of sterling silver 
and stands 25 in. high on an ebony plinth. 
The neck and upper portion of the cup is 
fluted in the French gadaroon style. The 
shield is handsomely engraved and sur- 
rounded by an applied wreath of maple 



leaves. The ribbon bearing the name of 
the Association is also applied. 

In the centre of the shield are bowls and 
net, the handles are also ornamented at 
outer extremity with bowls in lignum vitae. 
The base bears four sterling silver shields 
with lignum vitae bowls alternately placed. 

The design is most pleasing and reflects 
a great deal of credit on The Toronto Silver 
Plate Co.'s designer. 



10,000 DIFFERENT BRUSHES. 

It is an interesting fact to note that the 
United Factories, Limited, manufacure 
over 10 000 different kinds of brushes. 
They make a brush for every known want 
— from the finest camelhair brush down to 
the common dandy brush. Dealers who 
make a specialty of horse and carriage 
brushes will do well to note that this large 
concern import all their raw material direct 
from the producer. This means much in a 
wide margin of-profit sense to the retailer. 



LONDON ROLLING MILLS. 

Work on the plant of The London Rolling 
Mills Co., London, has commenced, and it 
is expected that the new industry will be in 
operation in November. The mills are to 
be located on Trafalgar street, east of the 
London and Port Stanley tracks, and 
adjoining the site for The McClary Co.'s 
new foundry. The main building will be 
150 x176 ft. About 65 persons will be 
employed at the start. The works at 
Guelph have been closed, and the removal 
of machinery to London begun. 



A NEW AGENCY. 



F. C. Hirsch & Co., 228 St. James street, 
Montreal, have been appointed sole Cana- 
dian agents by Hartley & Sudgen, Halifax, 
England, for their welded wrought iron boil- 
ers, for heating churches, schools and public 
buildings. These boilers, being welded, 
instead of riveted, cannot leak at the joints. 
For public buildings these boilers are unex- 
celled, and those having to fit up new 
buildings should examine them. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipmenti 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON. ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



INQUIRIES ABOUT CANADIAN 
TRADE. 

THE following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the Canadian Government 
Office in London : 

I. Inquiry is made for Canadian shippers of 
wood flour by a firm who are needing a consider- 
able quantity. 
^ 2. A London firm have asked to be placed in 
communication with some of the principal oilcake 
mills in Canada. 

3. A firm in a good posilion to undertake the 
agency in London of a large wood pulp mill in 
Canada desire to correspond with an important 
concern not already represented. 

4. A Welsh importer is desirous of obtaining 
fob. prices at Canadian ports, and c.i.f. prices 
Bristol or Liverpool for Canadian spruce and 
pine lumber, mouldings, etc.; also (or oils and 
greases in barrels or drums. He is also prepared 
to quote for high-grade Portland cement for 
export. 

5. An Italian house ask to be referred to a 
leading Canadian exporter of Labrador cod. 

6. An English firm manufacturing agricultural 
tools, steel files, etc., make inquiry respecting the 
opening in Canada for their goods. 

7. A Canadian firm of engineers with a branch 
in England are open to take up the agency for 
Canadian manufacturers of pig iron, steel rails, 
billets, iron and other ores, wood pulp, etc. 

8. A young Canadian now on a visit to Europe 
desires to get into touch with s 11116 English firms in 
the grocery and smallware line who require such 
an agency in the Dominion as he can offer on his 
return. 

[The names of the firms making the 
above inquiries can be obtained upon appli- 
cation to the Editor of Hardware and 
Metal. J 

SALE OF BLACK MAGNETIC ORE 
MINE. 

Deposits of black magnetic ore at Whyco- 
comagh, C.B., were sold, July 25, through 
the office of McLaughlan & McCabe, 
solicitors to officials of The Daminion Steel 
Co. for $ 1 00, 000. 

The quality of ore is by experts declared 
to be extraordinary, containing 66 per cent, 
metallic iron, with only traces of sulphur 
and phosphorus. The quantity of silica is 
but small. The mine was discovered last 
year, but it was only last month that its 
great value became apparent. Its fame 
traveled swiftly, for within the past few 
days requests for specimens have been 
received from Sault Ste. Marie, Montreal 
and Toronto. 

The quantity of ore is estimated at many 
millions of tons. 



THE COMMISSIONERS MEET. 

At the first meeting of the Temiskaming 
and Northern Ontario Railway Commission 
on Tuesday, July 29 all of the commission- 
ers were present— A. E. Ames, Edward 
Gurney ; F. W. Folger, Kingston ; M. J. 
O'Brien, Renfrew, and F. E. Leonard, 
London. Mr. Ames was chosen chairman, 
D. E. Thomson, K.C., was appointed 
counsel pro tem, and P. E. Ryan, secretary 
pro tem. Reports were received from W. 
B. Russell, chief engineer for the line, and 



The Value of Quality. 



The one thing and the most essential thing in any article that dis- 
tinguishes it, that makes it better and more satisfactory than other 
similar articles in quality. 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

has every essential of quality. It's a well made paint — one that always 
gives satisfaction to the user and never brings discredit on the dealer. 
It's a paint that a dealer may pass over the counter and be certain of 
good results. 

In addition to intrinsic worth, it has the selling qualities that build 
up trade and make money for the dealer. It's well advertised and is 
known and sold all over Canada. 

Our B-13 booklet tells how Sherwin-Williams Quality and Sherwin- 
Williams Advertising builds up paint business. Write for it to-day. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 



NEWARK, 
MONTREAL, 



BOSTON, 
T0RONI0. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY 




E. J. Sinclair, acting solicitor, showing the 
survey and the purchasing of the right of 
way to be making satisfactory progress. 
Work is in proceeding on the first 20 miles. 
The next meeting of the commission will 
be on August 9. 



CANADIAN AGENTS. 

Decatur, Ball & Co., Montreal, are sole 
Canadian agents for the National Cutlery 
Co.'s shears, who are not connected with 
any combination, who make all their own 
malleables, and manufacture the only 
tinners' snips and shears made in the world 
with a steel ride. No soft spots, no saw 
edges, and with a perfect guarantee. See 
cut of the no stop joint. Each pair of these 
shears put up in a separate pocket. 



A NEW ENTRANCE. 

Lewis Bros. & Co. will shortly have the 
new entrance to their warehouse completed, 
which will considerably improve the appear- 
ance of that part of the building. The new 
stairway, which is being put up, is much 
wider than the old one, and is being hand- 
somely fitted up in hardwood. The old 
entrance will be closed entirely. 



FINEST MICA MINE IN THE WORLD. 

The Lacy and Smith mica mine at 
Sydenham, near Kingston, is said from 
recent discoveries to be the finest mine of 
this class in the world. A new bed of great 
value has been turned up and pieces 7 ft. 
long have been taken out. 



AGAIN ON DECK. 

Mr. F. S. Murdoch, who represents The 
Canada Paint Co. in the Lower Provinces, 
had the misfortune a while ago to meet with 
an accident, fracturing his leg. We are 
happy to report that he is once more about 
and " on deck " for business. Mr. Murdoch 
has many friends in the Maritime Provinces 
who will be glad to hear of his recovery, 
and, it is understood, that a hearty welcome 
is awaiting him at various points. 



HER FIRST LOCOMOTIVE. 

The following is from The Toronto Globe 
of July 29, 1852 : "A locomotive was put 
in motion on Monday, for the first time, in 
New Brunswick, on the first section of the 
St. Andrew's and Quebec Railway." 



MR. CRATHERN A LEADER. 

Mr. Jas. Crathern, the well-known whole- 
sale hardwareman of Montreal, is a candi- 
date for reappointment as the representative 
of the Board of Trade on the Harbor Com- 
mission. "His record as a member of 
the commission," remarks The Gazette, 
" is evidence that to reelect him will be to 
retain the services of a capable man atten- 
tive to his duties. The likelihood is that 
he will be reelected." 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RETAIL MERCHANTS' MOONLIGHT. 

The Toronto Branch of the Retail Men h 
ants' Association of Canada will hold their 
annual moonlight excursion on Wednesday, 
August 13, 1902, on the steamer Chippewa. 



ECXURSION OF GUELPH SALESMEN. 

About 500 salesmen and clerks, of 
Guelph, enjoyed their second annual outing 
to Berlin on Thursday, July 24. The Royal 
City Association had chartered a special 
train. 

The officers were as follows : Secretary, 
O. L. Dunning ; starter, J. Gould ; judges, 
C. L. Nelles, F. Hendley and James Hewer. 
President Wallace, with the other officers 
and members of the committee, assisted 
these gentlemen, and the manner in which 
the sports were run off was indeed credit- 
able. 

In the evening, through the kindness of 
His Worship Mayor Eden, the Berlin band 
gave a concert at the park for the pleasure 
of the visitors, at which about 3,000 people 
were present. 



TOURISTS IN MARITIME PROVINCES 

The I.C.R. is doing a rushing business 
these days. The tourist travel this season 
is very large. For the 11 months of the 
year ending May 31 last there was a deficit 
of about 840,000, compared with $600,000 
for the same time last year. The June 
figures are not yet completed, but when 
they are this deficit will be wiped out and 
there will be a small surplus remaining. 
When the I.C.R. estimates were under dis 
cussion last season Mr. Blair said that he 
expected to close the year with a surplus of 
about $40,000 or $50,000, and his expec- 
tations, according to the information which 
is now being received at the Department, 
will be borne out when the final returns 
are in. 



AN EDMONTON HARDWAREMAN'S 
VIEWS. 

Jas. A. Stovel, one of the leading hard- 
ware merchants of Edmonton, Alta. in 
Winnipeg last week stated that the Edmon 
ton district is filling up very rapidly with a 
splendid class of new settlers, and real 
estate values have increased very materially 
during the last two years. One section of 
the district has been settled by a contingent 
of 3,000 Russians, who are all prosperous, 
and will make a substantial addition to the 
population of the West. Mr. Stovel has 
great faith in the future of the Edmonton 
district, and points to the remarkable 
growth of the town and district as one of the 
features of Western development. 



Robinson & Co. are reported as about to 
start in the retail hardware business in 
Toronto. 



The name IVER JOHNSON on a SINGLE BARREL 
SHOT GUN stands for absolute DEPENDABILITY 

A result which has established for it a world-wide reputation: has eaused the 

trade to prefer it to all others, and the public to demand it. 
To produce the best that money can buy, that experience can produce, is our 

CONSTANT AIIVI. 




Semi-Hammerless. Trigger Action. Ejector, or Non-Ejector. 
12, I6-Gauge. 28, 30, 32, 34-in. barrel. 

LIGHT SURE SAFE 

Send for new Catalogue just published. 

IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CY CLE WORKS, 

New York Salesroom: 99 Chambers St. MJ MM FITCHBURG, MASS. 

THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

. . . Successors to . . . 
The Toronto Branch of THE COPP BROS. CO., Limited. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Mantels, Grates, Tiles, etc. Coal Grates. Gas Grates. Gas Logs. 

HOT-AIR REGISTERS A SPECIALTY. 

Stove repairs for the Copp Bros', make of Stoves and Furnaces. 

New Address— 76 York: St., TORONTO. 




ss- 



Page Acme Poultry Netting 

is close meshed at bottom and does not require rail or 

board support at edges, having strong straight wire 

< No. 12 guage) at top, bottom and in centre, cannot sag 

^ and is easy to erect. The "Page Acme" netting is of 

?8 neat appearance, very durable and cheap. (Ve also 

Q? make farm and ornamental fence, gates, nails and 

staples. The name of Page is your guarantee of quality. 

The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited, Walkervillc, Ont. 6 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Gun Made. 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers. 

Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a woru 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



WANTED. 



WANTED-FOSITION IN GOOD HARDWARE 
^ore, by reliable young man; no experience. 
Anxious to obtain thorough knowledge of business. Can 
keep books. Best of references. Full particulars, 
write W. A. Matthews, Durham, Ont. (31) 



KNOX HENRY 



Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32 Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

Brand Horse 



HORSE NAILS-" C 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS - 
Limited, Birmingham, Kug. 



auiin Castor Co. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS 12k 



WHOLESALE 

° 



JLEOHL 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 
PRtMEl 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 






Beruan 




Dominion 



Winchester 



Eley's, 8 to 24 
I'. M.jQ., 10 tol'. 



^». S WADS !fe 



"3S&1 



'. M t i;, io"toi2 .^sSv^cVL 



1 






Thin Carboard Smokeless 

DOMINION 



Grease Proof Black Edge 



Thick Black Edge I Thick Black Edge 




Brown Felt. 



Empty Paper and Brass Sh 



ELEY'S 




ELEY'S, Loaded with Black Powder, 10, 12, 16, 20 Gauge 

" Smokeless " 10, 12, 16, 20 
DOMINION, •' " Black " 10, 12. 16 



V. M. C, Loaded with Black Powder, 10, 12, 16 Gauge. 



FOR FULLER PARTICULARS SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., limited, Toronto. 

Graham IMails &r& the Best:. 

Factory: Duffsrln Street, Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



I MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLY 
DEPARTMENT 



POWER REQUIRED TO DRIVE 
MACHINERY. 

SOME recent, tests made on machine 
tools and shafting' showed that 60 
feet of 2-inch shafting, driving 17 
countershafts with from one to three 
belts each, required 5 amperes to drive 
at r>n revolutions per minute, the cur- 
rent I )<■ i n l; supplied at L50 volts. 

To cut hard east iron required ti ain- 

pen s, ihe cut being- -J- by 1-10 inches, and 
the cutting speed 100 feet per minute with 
one of the new special tool steels. 

A 20-incb drilling machine run without 
cut, absorbed I ampere. A circular mill- 
ing machine, run on cut, took I ampere, 
ami idle it absorbed 0.5 ampere only. 

A spur-'gear cutting machine requires 
11.75 ampere idle, and L.25 ampere when 
cutting' teeth of about |-inch pitch three.' 
at once. 

A (i-inch lathe only absorbed 0.25 am- 
pere idle. Except the heavy boring mill 
with 30-inch table, which did the heavy 
cast-iron cut. the machines cited were all 
of light type. Generally, it may be said 
that machine tools of the light order re: 
quire very little power to drive them, and 
(here is not much present reason for ap 
plying separate motors to them. The (50 
feet of shafting cited above was driving 
17 machines, all placed on one side of the 
shaft. It. could drive an equal number of 
machines placed on the opposite side of 
the shaft, or, say, one machine to each 
2 fee* of shafting. As the belt pulls 
would balance on opposite sides, a total 
current for 34 machines and their counter- 
shafts would probably not exceed 8 am- 
peres, or, say, 0.25 ampere per machine. 
Where machine tools are busy, it. will not 
Bay to drive them by separate motors 
it will be better to group them on shaft- 
ing. Nothing, of course, sho'uld inter- 
fere with the grouping of the machine to 
secure the best arrangement of work. 

Where one shaft drives a number of 
similar machines, there is some economy 
to be secured by coupling' it up in several 
lengths, so that in the event of a slack 
period, or of overtime on a few machines 
pnly, the line shaft, may lie uncoupled 
beyond the few machines needed. Where 
ii can be arranged, the motor should 
drive upon the middle <>f the shaft, but 
very frequently it is more convenient, to 
arrange the motor to drive from the end. 

When a shaft drives different kinds of 

machines, all operating on Ihe sain.' 

pieces, ii may be both possible and con- 
venient for the machines to be mixed to- 
gether all alone' the shall, instead of 
being grouped in sets of A. B, (', etc. 

Than at slack periods some of each ma 
. In nr can be dri\ en oil one seel ion oi 

the shaft, the remainder of the shaft 
being uncoupled fur economj of power. 

This point is, of course, to be -■<'. ,n larj 

to shop economy, but may well be at 
tended to if other eco'monies permit of it. 



No bevel wheels should be permitted 
for coupling shafts at right tingles. Each 
shaft, must have its own motor. Heavy 
machines should not be grouped ,vnh 
light machine's, especially when the heavy 
machines arc of the reciprocating order, 
such as heavy planers. Heavy machines 
of this type demand a heavy current at 
each point of stroke reversal. They can- 
not well have fly-wheels, except at the 
motor side of the driving belt, because 
the back and forward strokes of the 
machine tire done at different speeds, and 
;t fly-wheel is therefore inadmissible. It. 
is thus proper for heavy machines to 
have their own motors, while it is also 
equally proper that a large number ol 
small machines should have one motor 
only the load on which is rendered more 
uniform with the number of machines ii 

drives. In textile machinery the speed is 
Constant for long periods at a lime in a 
lew machines, and absolutely so in 
others. It does not vary widely in any. 
In machine tool work machines are tit- 
led in themselves for a wide range of 
speed. Where a motor can be economi- 
cally run at wide limits ot spssd, it will 
enable the' machine which it drives to be 
simplified to a corresponding degree. 
When arranging for driving a new works, 
a balance must be struck between the 
simplification of the machine and of the 
motor which drives it. As specially ar 
ranged machines are at present more 
difficult to obtain of satisfactory order 
than of standard machines, this should 
be remembered when deciding upon the 
system to be employed. With separate 
motors to each machine, each motor 
must have a power in excess of the maxi- 
mum effort of the machine it drives. 
Consequently the aggregate power of a 
dozen separate motors will be nearly or 
quite double tin- power of a single motor 
that, would drive the dozen machines in 
a perfectly satisfactory manner. Separate 
motors are therefore likely to involve an 
excessivi first cost. For the remodelling 

of existing works, the separate motor 

will usually be quite out of the running. 
Fairly modern places may require little 
else than (he removal of present motive 
powers in favor of electrical motors, the 
present motive power being perhaps a 

small steam or Litis engine on each line 
shaft, or, perhaps, a pair of bevel wheels, 
or a belt or rope pulley. Where euorm 
mis economies have been effected by 
means of electrical driving, the cause 
must be sought in the widely scattered 

nature of the works, the comparative 
Fewness of machines, and (he great length 
oi shafting, or of more wasteful steam 
piping, and in the badness of the bear 

Lngs of the shafting and of (lie attention, 
as well as in the low quality of the many 
small engines employed. Hut in a textile 
Factory (here is but small hope of any 
cconomy by electrical driving. Probably 
about one-fifth the present indicate, I 
horse-power could at once be cut out by 
discarding the main engine and driving 
each shaft 1^' a separate motor. A really 



well-driven factory may require .'i7 tons of 
coal per 1,000 horsepower per week, or 
per Mill horse-power delivered to the 
shafting. The coal bill is, say, £20 per 
week. The engineer and fireman will 
still be required to attend to motors and 
heaters. To supply 800 horse-power for 
56 hours per week for JJ liu . will demand 
that energy must be sold for 0.107d. pet 
horse-power hour for fuel, to compete 
with the best present steam practice ; 
allow even \ of a penny per borse-power 
hour, or. say, 1-6 of a penny per unit. 
and it will be seen that where eleetrical 
energy is generated from coal, utilized by 
means of engines with a poor load factor 
and distributed by cables, there is but 
little prospect of Us competing with inde 
pendent high-class steam engines in well- 
arranged factories of the textile type. 
Hut there are undoubtedly many factories 
that use probably three times the amount 
of coal of our high-class assumed factory, 
at 50 per cent, greater price. Power 
must. therefore, cost these factories 
about ii.5d. per horse-power hour, or even 
0.7d. per unit. 

For second-class factories electrical en 
ergy can lie supplied at paying rale-;, 
while for certain classes of factories usiue. 
heavy machines which do not run con- 
tinuously, electricity can be purchased to 
show an economy. Every case must be 
considered on its own merits, but upon 
the general lines above indicated. — Elec 
trical Review. 

" TWO BALLS " 

" Two Halls " is the name of a folder 
which is being distributed by The Can 
atlian General Electric Company, Lim- 
ited. The Two Halls Adjustable Hanger, 
as the name implies, consists simply of 
two balls, within each of which is eon 
cealed in its proper relative position, a 
vulcanized hard fibre flanged pulley over 
which the cord passes. Thus the bear- 
ings for the cord are of the best insulat- 
ing material. The whole construction is 
so simple that there is virtually nothing 
to get out of order no springs, no me- 
chanism- two balls, that's all. Several 
culs are contained in the folder showing 
how it is possible to hang the light on 
a. " Two Halls " adjuster, and place it or 
take it just where you want it. The whole 
works with automatic adjustment. 

The hanger is shown in plain enamel 
finish, attached to a common rosette at 
the ceiling, with pattern finished in black 
iron, gold bronze and aluminum. The 

hanger is also used with a common at 
lachmeiil plug screwed into socket on the 
usual fixture, thus furnishing a conven 
ient way of using the " Two Balls " as 

a portable electric lamp. 'file hanger is 
also shown in plain polished brass or 
nickel with ceiling canopy, being used in 
a liner grade of work than tin 1 enamel 
finish. A cut shows (he hanger in fancy 
polished brass, embossed pattern. This 
is often chosen instead of the plain 
polished finish. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



WANTED- 



AN AGENT 
TO SELL 



Stocks, Dies and Taps and other En- 
gineers' Hand Tools and Platelayers' 
Tools to Hardware Factors, Railroad 
Companies and Mines, on a commission 
basis. Apply, 

Easterbrook, Allcard & CO., 

LIMITED. 
SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 



Do You Wish to Exchange 

Your old Boiler for a better one, or your Engine 
for a larger one ? Write me, stating just what you 
want to do. You will find the following list of 
interest if you contemplate any change : 



HORIZONTAL TUBULAR. 



No. 16098. 
No. 16224. 
No. 16232. 
No. U833. 
No. 14000. 
No. 15856. 



72 in 
7il in 
64 in 
22 in 
30 in 
41 in 



x 189 in. 
x 186 in. 
x 186 in. 
x 66 in. 
x 69 in. 
x 142 in. 



95 :'•'., in. tubes. 
7s i in. tubes. 
;"il I in. tubes. 
12 2% in. tubes. 
Return Tubular. 
42 .', in. tubes. 



ENGINES. 



No. 14965. Cylinder 8% in. x 14 in. stroke, L.H. 

No. 16146. " " 11 in. x 18 in. " 

No. 14880. " 10 in. x 28 in. " Corlisslied. 

No. 10115. " '.I in. x 12 in. " 

Monthly Stock List Sent on Request. 



H. W. PETRIE, 141-145 Front St. W., Toronto 



1 1 %, 




ill 


HO Blacksmiths' 


■u 


T w Hand 


i 

1 


• Drills. 


1 ¥ 

if 


<»"& The very 
best. 


A 


B. JARDINE & CO. 




HESPELER, ONT. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 

Ends Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamond Stove Back. 

Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 



For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware . 
\_ 

Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelpb, Ontario. 




"The Peerless 



53 is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices 




James Warnock & Co, 



Gait, Ont. 




G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 



LIMITED 



Manufacturers of- 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 



STANYON ENGINEERING CO. 



Phone Main 2177. 



402 MCKINNON BUILDING, 



TORONTO 



CONTRACTING AND CONSULTING ENGINEERS. 

Steel Works, all kinds of Rolling Mills, Wire Mills, etc. , all built complete. Machinery designed for any purpose 
General Offices - PITTSBURG, Pa. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York : 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. 



Galvanized Plain Wire 



Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Horse Shoes, Wke Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NICKEL STEEL FOR ENGINE 
FORGING. 

By R. S. Tappenden. 

THE principal advantage of nickel 
steel over ordinary carbon steel 
for forgings lies in the relation 
which the elastic limit bears to the ten- 
sile strength and elongation, the elastic 
limit being in a sense the true strength 
of the metal. The elastic limit of nickel 
steel is very much higher than the elas- 
tic limit of carbon steel of the same ten- 
sile strength and elongation, very often 
30 per cent, higher, and in some cases 
as much as 50 per cent, higher. The prin- 
cipal draw hark to the commercial use of 
nickel steel is the first cost of producing 
it, which, in many cases, is higher than 
the cost of ordinary finished forgings. 

The United States Bureau of Steam 
Engineering is using nickel steel very 
largely in the principal engine forgings, 
tin' specifications being of H. G. M. F. 
tensile, 95,000 ; elastic, 65,000 ; elonga- 
tion, 21 per cent, in 2 inches. These 
specifications are met and in many cases 
exceeded at the works of The Fore River 
Ship and Engine Company, some tests 
going as high as 74,400 elastic, 1 10,000 
tensile, 21 per cent, elongation. 

One virtue of nickel steel is the facility 
with which a low carbon steel will har- 
den, it being the practice after a forging 
is forged and rough-macliined, to heat 
it and dip in oil, which hardens it very 
much : afterward (lie forging is submit 
ted. to an annealing process which re- 
moves any strains set up in thi' metal by 
the sudden cooling which it receives. 
Nickel steel, after the first cost of produc- 
tion, is not much more expensive to 
forge than any carbon steel that runs 
over 0.40 per cent, carbon, and about the 
same care is necessary in heating and 
forging as is required by a high carbon 
steel. 

The market for nickel steel is gradually 
spreading to the commercial trade. Some 
of the largest engine builders are using 
it in work where special strength is re- 
quired ; notwithstanding the increased 
cost over common steel, it is money 
saved when we consider the cost of 
breakdowns and delays. 

In cases where strength and lightness 
are required, the high elastic limit of 
nickel steel permits of using forgings of 
much less sectional area for the same 
Strength. When the virtues of nickel 
steel become more largely known it will 
most surely be used largely in our mer- 
chant marine. One of the greatest bene- 
fits derived from its use is the fact that 
a fracture started is not nearly so apt 
to increase in size as in common steel or 
wrought iron. This is due to the great 
tenacity and strength of the metal. 

Nickel steel if properly forged, oil tem- 
pered and annealed has a very line grain, 
and the' fracture, in testine, is close and 
homogeneous and Eree from crystalline 
spots. Nickel steel permits of a very 
tine finish on polished surfaces, and is 

i from checks and seams, and compares 

\.i\ favorably with any other composi- 
tion of either steel or wrought iron. 

in forging the ingots the United States 
Government requires a discard of 20 per 
cent . from the top and 5 per cent, from 
the bottom from all bottom poured in 
gots and a discard of 2."> per cent. From 
the top of all others. The wisdom oi 
this policy is borne out in general prai 
,i,,., is the testing machine shows very 



quickly when the stock is taken too near 
the top or bottom of an ingot. Any- 
body trying to be economical in workin 
up the discard always regrets the at- 
tempt, as it soon shows in the quality 
of material, and inspectors should be ex- 
tremely careful that the full amount of 
discard is taken off and not embodied in 
the forgings. 

NEW GASOLINE MACHINE. 

A. F. Gundlach, of Sorel, Que., and F. 
Paul, jr., have invented a new gasoline 
gas-producing machine. It obviates diffi- 
culties experienced from danger of as- 
phyxiation, and the light is cheap. One 
gallon of gasoline produces 516 feet of 
gas, thus making the gas cost Hie. per 
I. feet. 

TO PREVENT COLLISIONS 

An interesting invention for the pre- 
vention of railroad collisions has been 
made by W. J. and J. P. Hare, of To- 
ronto. By means of a third rail, com- 
posed of two bands of metal insulated 
on a wooden base, on a wheel similarly 
constructed an electric current is sent out 
half a mile or more in each direction 
from the engine, the current being al- 
ternated by means of an eccentric connec- 
tion in the driving wheel axle. It is 
claimed that tests have shown that in 
this way a positive warning will be given 
to each of two approaching locomotives. 

NEW LIFT LOCK NEAR PETERBORO'. 

Rapid progress is being made in the 

new lift lock on the Trent Valley Canal, 
just east of Peterboro', which, when com- 
pleted, will greatly lengthen this chain oi 
inland navigation. This lock is quite 
remarkable in its way. Its function will 
be to lift vessels bodily a height of 65 
feet, to cover ;t high ridge of land and to 
avoid building half a dozen or more 
small locks, to pass which would con- 
sume so much more time. The new lock 
will accommodate vessels 140 feet lone. •' • 
feet wide, and of 6 feet draught, and is 
built to raise 2,000 tons by hydraulic 
pressure. In its construction, which has 
so far occupied four years, 26,01111 cubic 
yards of concrete, made from Canadian 
Portland cement, have been used, or a 
weight calculated at 112,320,000 pounds 
The work is of great magnitude, and vet 
simplicity, as the lifting of the; one pon- 
toon containing the \ essel will be accom- 
plished by hydraulic pressure by filline' 
the corresponding pontoon with water to 
the required weight and lowering it, thus 
the one weight of water raising the other, 
including the vessel, hv overbalancing it. 



A NEW ELECTRIC CLOCK. 

Th(_' latest electrical device is a clock 
that will run for more than three years 
without winding, and keep good time 
throughout the entire period, says Profit- 
able Advertising. It was invented by 
Oscar A. En Holm, and is manufactured 
by The Commercial Electric Time Com- 
pany. 

The application of electricity is in sup 
i I \ 1 1 1 ■ >• a motive power in (he place ot the 
usual spring. In the base of the clock. 
Concealed from view, are two sealed bat- 
teries whose capacity is ten ampere 
hours. In the place of the spring, and 
running through the centre of an electro 
magnet or solenoid, is an armature in 



the form of a rod composed of a mag- 
netic material. This core is suspended 
from a lever, which is connected to the 
gear train by means of a small ball 
clutch guided by standards. The clock 
starts with the core or armature at its 
highest point, its own weight carries it 
downward ; and, as it descends, it pulls 
down the lever with it, which has a 
sliding motion insuring uniform driving 
! >ouer, thus giving the driving power to 
the regular machinery of the clock. 

When the armature reaches the lowest 
point it tips a bulb containing mercury, 
which completes the circuit. This causes 
the electromagnet to raise the armature 
to its original height, when the bulb 
again assumes an upright position, dis- 
connecting the circuit. 

It is stated that the batteries contain 
enough electricity to run the clock for 
more than 3,000 days, or over eight 
years, but the makers guarantee it for 
onlv three vears. 



MACHINERY NOTES. 

H. W. Petrie, Toronto, shipped .1. 
Ballantyne & Son, Preston, a 16-inch 
shaper. 

Dynient, Butterfield cV Co.. Barrie, 
Din., have added a 100-inch radial drill 
to their plant, the machine being furn- 
ished by II. W. Petrie, Front street west, 
Toronto. 

The duly monthly slock list of machin- 
ery, tools and power has just been issued 
by H. W. Petrie, 111-115 Front street 
west, Toronto. It contains its usual 
complete list of machines for immediate 
delivery. 

Owing to (he satisfaction given by a 
dew el " automatic engine installed in 
the plant of The Northern Navigation 
Company, at Collingwood, some time 
ago, II. W. Petrie, 111 -145 Front stive 
west, Toronto, has just made ship- 
ment of another No. 4 " Jewel,''' to be 
operated in the plant of the above com- 
pany. 

The Toronto Junction Gasoline Engine 

Company, 116 Bay street, Toronto, have 
just received a consignment of steel 
launches finished throughout with polish- 
ed oak. They report that Br. Emery hits 
taken their gasoline launch Wanda to 
Lake Simcoe. This company has just 
completed a gasoline engine for pump - 
ing oil for the plant of Fox & Ross, 
Nort liw ood. 

A CLEVER DEVICE. 

An exc lingly clever device is "Porce 

lain Cleats. \'o. 1710." just issued by The 

Canadian General Electric Company, 
Limited. Reasonable claims, tersely ex 
pressed and admirably arranged render 
the advertisement neat and attractive. 
" Hardware and Metal " seldom sees a 
better distribution card. The final ex- 
hortation is particularly g<5bd. " If you 

agree', you will order ; if you doubt, 
order and be convinced." This advertise 
ine effort is sure to prove a splendid 
trade bringer. 



The International Mining Company, 
Limited, with a share capital of $1,500, 
0110. has been incorporated by a number 
of Sault Sle. Marie men. including L. 
('. Ilolden. \\. M. Snell, V. F. Metzger, 
M. .1. Magee and S. E. Fleming. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



1§ 



TWENTY NEW LOCOMOTIVES. 

Twenty consolidated locomotives for 
special freight service, five passenger loco- 
motives, and two for switch work are among 
the additions to the rolling stock of the 
I.C.R. The contract for these has been 
given to the Canadian Locomotive Co., of 
Kingston, Ont. The Rathbun Co., of 
I^sseronto, Ont., will build 150 platform 
cars for the people's road. In the I.C.R. 
shops at Moncton there are under construc- 
tion four 10 wheeled passenger locomotives, 
a first class car and a number of platform 
and box cars. 

Facilities at Moncton are also to be 



increased by the addition of a car shop, 
blacksmith shop, storerooms and offices for 
the rolling stock department, all of which 
work will be done by tender. Roundhouses 
and shops will also be built at River de 
Loup and Chaudiere Junction. 

These additions have been necessitated by 
the very rapid development of the business 
on the line. 

The new I.C.R. steel ferry steamer Scotia 
is running on regular schedule across the 
Strait of Canso and is giving every satisfac- 
tion. When the 30 mile stretch of road 
from Stellarton is equipped with the 80-lb. 
rails the I.C.R. will have heavy rail facilities 



from Truro to the Sydneys. This is 
expected to prove of immense advantage in 
handling the traffic which must eventually 
come from the Cape Breton towns. 



BEDSTEADS. 



An invitation is extended to the trade to 
see the samples of English brass and 
enamelled bedsteads of every description, 
which F. C. Hirsch & Co., 228 St. James 
street, Montreal, have received. They are 
manufactured by the old-established firm of 
Thomas Perry & Sons, Limited, of Bilston, 
England, whose reputation for the manufac- 
ture of these articles is world-wide. 



ATKINS 



HIGH-GRADE, C"* IjL 1A/C ARE superior to all others in material, tem- 

CROSS-CUT ^J/\ ¥¥ ^7 PER, WORKMANSHIP, FINISH and CUTTING QUALITIES. 
OUR VICTOR, TUTTLE TOOTH AND SEGMENT GROUND SAWS ARE THE FAVORITES IN THE CAMPS 




E. C. ATKINS & Co., 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



Leading Manufacturers of HIGH-GRADE, CROSS-CUT, HAND, BAND, 
CIRCULAR, HACK, BACK, WOOD and SMALL SAWS of all kinds. 

Write for Catal ogue and Prices. 








Of the Wearing Kinc 



There is nothing in which the public 
can be more easily deceived than Silver- 
ware. The goods may look well, but how 
long will it be before that brassy or black 
color will appear underneath ? 

Standard Silverware 

is manufactured only in first-class 
quality, and all goods bearing our brand 
are guaranteed to look well, and therefore 
sell well, and to wear well, and therefore 
please well. 

Our Fall and Christmas Catalogue, 
giving some valuable pointers to the trade, 
may be had for the asking. 



STANDARD SILVER CO., 



LIMITED, 



V 



31=41 Hayter Street 



TORONTO, ONT. 




20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 



CALCIUM CAR- 
BIDE AT 
SHAWENEGAN. 



EXISTING plants. have been quite un- 
able in keep pace with the increas- 
ing demand for calcium carbide, 
i he substance used principally in making 
acetylene Lias. The industry is said to 
be only in its infancy, and men who nave 
studied the question prophesy that within 
a comparatively short 
lime calcium carbide 
will he used to a far 
greater extent than at 
present, especially for lighting purposes. 
Shawenegan Tails, the new manufactur- 
entre of the Province of Quebec, will 
soon have extensive calcium carbide 
works. 

It has peculiar advantages, which will 
help to make the new carbide company a 
tremendous success. In the first place, 
there is an inexhaustible supply of cheap 
water-power, then taxes air exceedingly 
low, and the supply of labor is sufficient 
io provide for all requirements in that 
direction. The town is centrally situated. 
and it is an easy matter to ship to any 
point in the Dominion either by water or 
rail. 

The Shawenegan Carbide Company, as 
the new concern will.be known, has been 
organized under the laws of the Province 
of Ontario, confirmed by a special Act of 
(he Quebec Legislature, and will operate 
under the patents granted to Thos. L. 
Wilson, of Ottawa. Among the directors 
are lames W. Tyke, of Montreal ; John 
Joyce, of Boston ; Walter Barwick, of 
Toronto : and J. E. Aldred, who has 
played so important a part in developing 
the resources of Shawenegan Falls. 



At a meeting of The Iron Manufactur- 
ers' Association (Brukssocieteten) at 
Jernkontoret, Sweden, Engineer F. A. 
Kjellin and Mr. Benedicks gave some very 
MANUFACTURE interesting information 
OF ELECTRO- about the production of 

electro- steel at Gysingc. 

The problem of smelt- 
ing steel by electricity has for a long 
time alt raited the attention of inventors. 
By the advice of Engineer Kjellin. Mr. 
Benedicks decided in 1899 to build at 
Gysinge an electric steel furnace without 
electrodes. 

In the latter part of February, 1900, 
the first furnace was finished and ready 
for trial, and after a few experiments the 
first ingot was produced. The steel was 
found to 'be of excellent quality. The 
problem was thus solved technically, but 
noi economically; for, with the dynamo 
of 78 kilowatts nsftd, not more than i2T < > 
kilograms (575 lb.) of steel were obtained 
iii ii I hours, and in the furnace there was 
hot room for more than 80 kilogrami 
( 17(1 lli.i. A larger furnace was seen to 
lie accessary, and this was completed in 
November, 1900, and proved to be a 
great improvement. In the second fur 
uace, which held 180 kilograms (397 lb. 1, 
from (500 to 700 kilograms i 1,220 to 1,340 
Hi i ol tee! were produced in 24 hours. 

The Gysinge sulphite factory burned 
down on August II. 1901, and it was dc 

cided to build steel works in its place 
and to use the water-power available 

I here. For the steel furnace there was 
utilized a turbine of 300 horsepower. 

with direct coupled generator. Tin. nun 
furnace is to hold 1,800 kilograms (3,970 

II,. t. and the production is estimated to 



STEEL IN 
SWEDEN 



lie at least L,500 tons a year if charged 

with cold raw material. 

Engineer Kjellin said that the steel pro- 
duced is of superior quality and char- 
acterized by strength, density, uniform- 
ity, toughness, and the ease with which 
it can be worked in cold, unhardened 
condition, even when containing a very 
high percentage of carbon. Compared 
with other steel, it also has less tendency 
to crack or warp when hardened. 

The reason why this steel in certain 
qualities differs from other steel, espe 
cially in its softness when unhardened, is 
considered to be its freedom from gases. 
The manufacture of special steel, with 
nickel, chrome, manganese, and wolfram, 
will, of course, not meet with any diffi- 
culties. The chrome steel and wolfram 
steel produced at Gysinge have proved to 
be excellent for lathe tools. When used 
for permanent magnets, the Gysinge 
wolfram steel has been found to give 
stronger magnets than other wolfram 
steel, and has not warped in the harden- 
ing. 

From estimates made, it has been as- 
certained that the furnace used at 
Gysinge, which is simple in construction 
and easily managed, has prospects of 
competing, as to cost of operation, with 
the furnaces heretofore used for fusion of 
steel, especially as it yields steel of a 

better quality.- 

At a meeting of the ratepayers of Syd- 
ney, C.B., on Friday last for the purpose 
of discussing the advisability of granting 
a bonus to a shipbuilding industry, 
Mayor Crowe stated 
SHIPBUILDING that as a result of the 
AT SYDNEY. bonus of .§50,000 grant- 

ed to The Dominion 
Iron and Steel Company in 1898, instead 
of a town of 2,500 there was a splendid 
city of at least 14.000 people, and more- 
over, the rate of taxation had not been 
increased one cent. He urged strongly 
a bonus for a steel shipbuilding industry. 
The follow in"" resolution was passed: — 
Resolved that Uiis meeting request the town 
council to cai a public meeting of the ratepayers 
at the earlie;t date permitted by law to consider the 
advdabihty of voting a sum of 5250,000 as a bonus 
towards a shipbuilding industry to be established 
within th^ town limits. 



A representative of The Canadian 
Scoria Block Company visited North 
Sydney last week to select a suitable site 
for the erection of a plant to manufac- 
ture bricks. Hitherto 
SCOR.A BLOCK (|)( . s(; ^^ ,,.„.,, ,,,.,.„ 

Sydney. j""' ^" 1 , u ] ***** 
from Kngland and Del 

gium, where they are made from the slag 
of blast furnaces. The company has al 
ready made blocks in Toronto. and a 
thorough lest of them made liy Dr. 
Bovey, the Dean of the Faculty of Ap- 
plied Science at McGill, proved their 
superiority over the imported article. 

Tin' high cost of scoria blocks has hither 

to limited their use to street Crossings 

and street railway pavements, but when 

l!e\ are turned out at a greatly reduced 

cost, they will. it. is expected, be largely 

used for the foundation of buildings, 
piers, and for use in damp places. The 
company has purchased the exclusive 
right to manufacture by the new pro 

cess and has secured the services of the 



inventor to overlook the work of manu- 
facture. The company is being formed 
in Toronto with a capital of §150.000. 
The provisional directors are Hon. John 
Dryden, Hon. George Foster, H. Wad 
dington, W. C. Trotter, Simpson Rennie, 
•1. Blacklock and William Murhas. 



The Sarnia Steel Bridge and Structural 
Works is a new enterprise added to tl. 
list of Sarnia's manufacturing induSH 
tries. The new works have been estab 

lished in The Turnbull 
A NEW Boiler Works on tin 

bridge FIRM. bay shore. The man- 

ager of the new- con 
ri'i'ii is W. H. Mackenzie, formerly of The 
Port Huron Bridge Works. Port Huron. 
a gentleman of long experience in the 
business of steel and wrought - iron con 
struction, and thoroughly acquainted 
with every department, theoretical and 
practical, of the business. The Sarnia 
Bridge ( empam e specialty will be the 
construction of steel and wrought iron 
highway bridges, but they will be pie- 
pared to handle all varieties of steel and 
wrought iron structural works. The use 
of steel construction for road bridges. 
growing out of the increasing scarcity 
find consequent costliness of suitable 
bridge timber, is extending year by year. 
The company has already orders on its 
books from two municipalities in the 
county for steel bridges, with the prospect 
of several more important contracts of a 
similar kind to follow in the near future. 



The Paris Plow- Company. Limited, has 
just been incorporated with a share 
capital placed at $250,000, at Paris, 
Out. The applicants for incorporation 
were Messrs. Frederick Ward, of Batavia, 
N.Y.j John Penman, R. L. Murray, S. 
Appleby, P. G. Wickson, of Paris ; and 
C. Barker and G. D. Clump, of South 
Dumfries township. The company will 
manufacture plows and other agricultural 
implements. 



THE IRON MOULDERS. 

The Iron Moulders' Convention in ses 
sion in Toronto, on Friday last selected 
Philadelphia as the place of meeting in 
1905. 

The elections resulted as follows : — 
President, Martin Fox, Covington, Ky.: 
first vice-president, Jos. K. Valentine, 
San Francisco, Cal.j second vice-presi 
dent. M. J. Keough, Troy, N.Y.; third 
vice-president, J. P. Frey, Worcester. 
Mass.; fourth vice-president, John Camp 
bell, Quincy, III.; secretary, E. J. Denney, 
Cincinnati, ().; assistant-secretary. John 
G. Weaver. Covington, Ky.: financier, K. 
II. Metcalf, Cincinnati, ().; treasurer, 
Alex. Faulkner, Cleveland. ().: editor Iron 
Moulders' Journal, David Black. Cincin- 
nati, (t. 

All of the foregoing officers were re- 
elected, but there were other candidates^ 
for every position, and in some cases the 
contest was keen. 

Most of the candidates left Saturday, 
and the secretary paid out about $50,000. 
This convention lasted longer than any 

other in the history of the order. It was 

■Jti days since it opened. Each delegate 

received X'-'i a day and travelling expen- 
ses. The mileage and per diem allowance 
while travelling amounted in the aggre 

gale to 820,000. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



Our stock of goods for the spring trade is 
now complete, and we can fill all orders promptly 
on the following lines : 

Wire, IS ails. Cordage, Window 
Glass, White Lead, Paints, Whit- 
ing, Churns, Linseed Oil, Spades 
and Shovels, Screen Doors, Wove 
Wire, Poultry Netting, Builders* 
Hardware, Guns and Sporting 
Goods. Finest stock in the 
Province of Cutlery. 

Prompt Shipment. Prices Right. 



DOMINION 

Wire Manufacturing Company, Limited 



Head Office 

MONTREAL 

Que. 



Annealed, 

Oiled and Annealed, 

Bright, 

Bright Spring, 

Coppered, 

Coppered Spring, 

Brass, Brass Spring, 

Copper, Tinned and 

Galvanized WIRES. 



^%2 




Branch Office 

jji||| TORONTO 



Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws. 
Jack Chain. 
Cotter Pins. 
Bright Wire Goods. 
Door Pulls. 
" Crescent " 
Coat and Hat Hooks 
Tinned Bottling 
Wires. 



Fence, Poultry Netting, Bed and Blind Staples. 

COPPER AND GALVANIZED WIRE 

For Telegraph and Telephone Lines. 



What Does It Mean ? 




When a merchant selects goods without a blemish it means that every transaction 
must please the customer. These are the good goods that keep your clerks busy : — 

Boeckh's Standard Brooms and Brushes, 
Bryan's London Brushes, 
Cane's Newmarket Woodenware. 

If our representative does not visit your town, write us, and we will, if possible, 
arrange for him to call upon you, or we will send you quotations and full particu- 
lars of these goods by mail. Our illustrated Catalogue free for the asking. 



UNITED FACTORIES, Limited, 



Head Office : Toronto. 



OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 



LONDON WAREHOUSE, 
65 Dundas Street. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, August 1. 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

MIDSUMMER quietness, as usual, 
now prevails in hardware circles. 
But although business is not as 
brisk as some weeks ago. orders for fall 
delivery are coining in satisfactorily, and 
as tlic present season is inevitable and 
always expected, the trade are not in a 
complaining mood by any means. A.mong 
the fall e^oods now beginning to move 
are lanterns, sleigh bells, skates and 
hockej sticks, guns, etc., orders for which 
for fall delivery have begun to come in 
well. An advance of 5c. took place in 
black tea kettles, Nfos. 8 or 9 now being 
quoted at 55c. and No. 10 at GOc. In picks 
there i \ also an advance in price, amount 
ing to aliniit 50c. per doz. all round. The 
prices now are : 5 to 6 IT).. $4.75 per 
dozen ; to 7 IT)., §5.10 ; 7 to 8 ll>.. 
§5.35; short mattocks, $5.65; lone mat- 
tocks, $5.75; pick mattocks. $5.75. The 
prices on wire netting for 1003 have been 
settled and the new discounts will be found 
under the heading of "poultry netting." 
Other lines in general hardware are un- 
changed in price. 

SCYTHES.— These have become very 

ipiiei on the market, the demand now 
being whollv of a sorting nature. We 



now quote : Lance, No. 80, §5.50 ; Hurd's 
Clipper. $6.50 ; concave, $7.50 ; Sibley, 
$8.50 ; Cradle scythes, cast steel, $S.50 ; 
silver steel, $9.50 : " Harvest King," 
$10.50. Hush scythes, $0.50. 

BARB WIRE.— Trade in barb wire con- 
tinues quiet. The demand is still very 
light, and business is confined to small 
orders for some special purpose. There 
has been no change in the price, which is 
$3 per L00-H). keg f.o.b. Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE— There is noth- 
ing of importance to note in this mar- 
ket, which is quiet under a light de- 
mand. Prices are steady. We quote : 
Vs. (J, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45 ; No. 9. 
S2.S0 ; No. 10, $3.55; No. 11, $3.05; No. 
12. $2.95; No. 13, $3.05; No. 14, $4.05; 
No. 15, $4.55; No. 16, $4.80; No. 17, 
$5.20 ; No. IS, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. -Business in 
this line is still of a quiet nature at un- 
changed prices. Our quotations are 
now as follows : Bright and annealed, 
$2.60 per 100 ft.' f. o. b. Mont- 
real, Toronto, Halifax, London, Hamil- 
ton and St. John. Net extras per 100 Tb. 
are as follows : Coppered wire, 60c; tin- 
ned wire, $2 ; oiling, 10c; spring wire, 
81.25; best steel wire, 75c; bright soft 
drawn, 15c; special hay-baling wire, 30c. 

FINK WIRE.— The market is very much 
the same as a week ago. There is but a 
small demand, and trade is quiet. The 



discount, which is unchanged from last 
week, is 22A per cent. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.— There i V 
no change. The market continues quiet 
and featureless, with the discount still at 
00 per cent. 

PENCE STAPLES.— There is not much 
doing in fence staples. A few orders are 
still received, but the market, in general, 
is very quiet. Prices are unchanged, 
and galvanized staples are quoted at 
$3.25 per 100 lb. keg, and bright at $2. '.hi 
per 100-tb. keg. For 25 and 50-Ib. pack 
aces. 25c. extra is charged. 

WIRE NAILS.— These are in fairly good 
demand. No quotable change has occur- 
red, and in small lots the price is $2.55 ; 
in carlots, $2.50 f.o.b. Montreal, London, 
Hamilton, Toronto, (Jananoque, Brant- 
Ford, Windsor, Ont., St. John and Hali- 
fax. 

CUT NAILS. — There is a moderate de 
maiifl for cut nails at unchanged prices. 
We quote : $2.45 per keg for small lots, 
and $2.37^ per keg for carlots. 

HORSE NAILS.— There is a small 
amount of business doing in horse nails. 
Jobbers report a continual improvement 
in the number of orders as the fall ap- 
proaches. The discount on " Monarch 
nails has been changed to 70 and 5 per 
cent, instead of 66 2-3, per cent. We 
quote : " C " brand, 50 and 7 J, per cent. 



Preserving Season Requirements 



<\ 



# 



■* 



,<> 



^ V 



Have you examined your stock of Preserving Utensils lately ? 

It would be unfortunate to run out of any of these lines just at present. 

We can make prompt shipment of any orders (large or small) for these goods. 



-5 




Lipped Preserving Kettles 

Made in 12 Sizes, in "Famous" 
and "Imperial" Enamel Ware. 



Fruit Strainers 



WITH MASHERS. 



HAVE WIRE HANDLES. 




it Funnels . . . 

Tin and Enamelled. 

IVIoClary Manufacturing Co., 

TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

"Everything for the Tinshop" 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



ENGLISH 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 

FIRE 

BUILDING 

ENAMELLED 

SILICA 

MAGNESIA 

DRAIN 
CULVERT 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



BRICKS. 



} PIPES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER PIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

•« CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



u 



JJ 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
» Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
rery best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prlcas to Salaa Agaata 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

•r to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. UaUta4 



off ; " M " brand, for " Oval " and "New 
City " heads, GO per cent, off, and for 
" Now Countersunk " heads, 70 per 
cent. off. "Monarch" horse nails are also 
discounted at 70 and 5 per cent. 

HORSESHOES.— A fair demand is re- 
ported for horseshoes, and trade is im- 
proving. Nothing- of interest has occur- 
red during the past week on this market. 
We (|iiote : Iron shoes, light and medium 
pattern, No. 2 and larger, §3.35 ; No. 1 
and smaller, $3. GO ; snow pattern, No. 2 
and larger, S3. GO ; No. 1 and smaller, 
§3.85 ; X L steel shoes, new light pat- 
tern, sizes 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, 
§3. 15 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.70 ; feather- 
weight, all sizes, to 4, §5 ; toe weight, 
all sizes, 1 to I. $6.25. Shoes, more than 
one size' in a keg, LOc. per keg extra. 
E.o.b. Montreal only. 

SCREWS. — These are moving about as 
usual. A fair and steady demand is re- 
ported with no quotable changes what- 
ever, and the discounts are as follows : 
Round head bright, 82£ and 10 per cent.; 
Hat head brio-ht, 81 i and 10 per cent.; 
brass, round heads, 75 and 10 per cent.; 
brass, flat heads, 80 and 10 per cent. 

CORDAGE. — There is nothing new to 
report in this line. The market is still 
<|uiel for cordage. Binder twine is scarce 
and linn in price, but no quotable change 
has been made. Our quotations are 
now as follows : Manila. 15c; British 
maniia, 13c; sisal, 12-Jc; lathyarn. lie. 
Prices on binder twine are as follows : 
Blue Ribbon, G50 feet to the pound, 15c; 
Redcat, GOO feet to the pound, 14c. ; 
Tiger, 550 feet to the pound, 13c ; 
Standard, 500 feet to the pound, II Ac; 
sisal, 500 feet to the pound. 1 1 Jc. Prices 
are subject to a rebate of £c in carload 
lots. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— The demand is 
keeping up well on both lines, and the 
market is fairly active and steady. The 
prices are unchanged. Discounts are : 
Best iron rivets, section carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 
and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
with the usual proportion of burrs, 45 
per cent, off, and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5-lb. carton boxes, are 
quoted at GO and 10 per cent, off list. 

BOLTS. — These continue to move about 
as usual. Trade is fair and nothing of 
importance has occurred during the week. 
We quote : Norway carriage bolts, 55 per 
cent.; common, 50 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 55 per cent.; machine 
bolts. 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws. 
GG 2-3 per cent.; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 and 
5 per cent.; blank bolts, 50 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 50 and 5 per cent.; 
plough bolts. 50 and 5 per cent. To any 
retailer an extra discount of 10 per cent, 
is allowed. Tire bolts, 67^ per cent. ; 
stove bolts, 67^ per cent. Nuts, square, 
3J per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 3fc. 
per lb. off list. To all retailers an extra 
discount of %c. per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER.— Business during 
the past season in building paper and 
builders' hardware has been of the most 
satisfactory character. Building paper, 
in particular, moved rapidly throughout 
the season, and sales have been very 
large in comparison with other years. 
Now, however, the demand has dropped 
off greatly and the market has become 
auiet. Prices are unchanged. We quote : 
Tarred felt, §1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
ready roofing, 85c per roll ; 3- ply. $1.10 
per roll ; carpet felt, §2.25 per 100 lb.; 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

IRON, STEEL 
«„«. METALS 

BEST BRANDS AT LOW PRICES TO 
WHOLESALE BUYERS, 

Sanderson's Steel in Stock 



509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



SATISFIED 
CUSTOMERS 

When you sell a man a 
McDougall Pump you 
know he will be satisfied, 
because you have sold him 
the best pump made. 

There are no better 
pumps than McDOt'GALL 
PUMPS. 

Write today for cata 
logue. 

QUALITY BEST 
PRICES EIGHT 




The R. McDOUGALLCO., 



Limited 



GALT, ONT. 

Manufacturers of Purups for all services. 



Pig Iron 

We offer to arrive : 

No. i Eglinton 
No. i Middlesbro' 
No. 3 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., l^ 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers o f 

Femma Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTTH 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



\ Good Thing 

when once tried is sure to make a strong 
appeal to your customers and meet with corre- 
sponding appreciation. 

This is demonstrated by the increasing 
demand for 

Elastilite Varnish, 
Chijap Floor Lac, 
Maple Leaf Varnish Stain 
and Coach Enamels. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



[he 



Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



Toronto, Ont., Canada. 



LIMITED 



Canadian Agents for Buehne's "Red, White and Blue" Brand Steel Wool. 



For a good all-round trade-winner and 
trade-keeper there is nothing you can 
stock to compare with a reliable line of 
paint. 

"Ark Brand" 



has many points that cannot be equalled 
by other paints, and we give you a written 
guarantee to back up what is said of 
it. On the whole "Ark Brand" cannot be 
beaten. Our sales prove this. 



V^ 



FRANCIS-FROST C - 



ted 



TORONTO. 
Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



dry sheathing-, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll; 
tarred fibre, 60c. per roll ; K and I X 
L, 65c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, 
§30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c. per roll. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH.— There is lit- 
tle demand for this. The market is quiet, 
and the price remains at $1.37£ per 100 
square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING.— Trade is quiet 
at present in this line. Prices on wire 
netting for 1003 have been decided on, 
and the discounts will be 60 per cent, off 
for 19 wire and 55 per cent, off for 
heavier. For immediate delivery there is 
no change, and Canadian or English is 
discounted as follows : 2 x 2 mesh, 19. 
wire, 50 and 10 per cent.; 2 x 2 mesh, 
heavier wire, 50 per cent. Canadian list 
used. 

HARVEST TOOLS— Business in this 
line is quiet and featureless. The dis- 
count is (ill per cent. 

FIREBRICKS.— These move out slowlj 
and trade is quiet. We quote : English, 
s|C, to $22 and Scotch, §17 to $22 per 
l.llllll. 

( IE ME NT.- There has been no material 
change in the condition of the market. 
The demand is only fair, and prices are 
unchanged. Our quotations arc as fol- 
lows : Canadian cement, $1.90 to $2.25; 
German, $2.20 to $2.30; English, $2.15 
to $2.25 : Belgian, $1.70 to $1.95 per 
barrel ex wharf, and American, $2.10 to 
$2.20 ex cars. 

METALS. 

The metal market continues active, 

and is in a somewhat better condition in 
some lines. Supplies, which became 
short on account of the damage done to 



the Monteagle's cargo, have been replen- 
ished to a certain extent by that of the 
steamer Montfort, now in port. As re- 
gards the cargo of the Monteagle, some 
of the terne plates came out all right, 
but not a great quantity, while the Can 
ada plates suffered badly. 

PIG IRON. — There is no change in the 
price. The market remains very firm. We 
quote : Canadian, .$18. 50 to $19 and Sum- 
merlee, $21.50 to $22. 

BAR IRON— The demand is fair. The 
price of merchants' bar is $2 and of 
horseshoe iron, $2.20. 

BLACK SHEETS.— These are in fair 
demand and there is still some shortage 
reported. We quote: 28 gauge. 82.65; 
2(1 gauge, $2.60; 20 to 24 gauge, $2.50. 
and S to 20 gauge, $2.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON. This continues to 
move out well at unchanged prices. We 

now epiote as follows : No. 28, Queen's 
Head, $4.40 ; Apollo, lOf oz., $4.40 ; 
Fleur de Lis, $4.15 ; Comet, $4.25 ; •'Bell" 
brand, $4.30. For less than case lots 
10c. extra is charged. 

[NGOT COPPER.' There is a fair in- 
quiry. No change in price is reported. 

We (plote I 1c. 

[NGOT TIN.— This has not improved. 
The demand is only fair. The price of 
Si rails remains at 33.\e. 

PIC LEAD. — There has been uo change 
in the condition of this market, which is 
still quiet, the price being $3.25,. 

LEAD PIPE. Composition and waste 
are quoted at 8c. and ordinary at 7c.. 
with the discount at '■'>'!, per cent. The 
demand is only fair. 

[RON PIPE.— A moderate' business is 
doing this week at unchanged prices. 



Our quotations are as follows : Standard 
pipe per 100 feet, in lengths under 10 
feet : Black, |. X2.ll ; g, S2.65 ; .', , $2.85 ; 
I, S3. 65 : l-in., $5.20 : I], 87.35 ; I .', . 
$8.95; 2-in., $12.55. Galvanized. k, $3.20; 
|, 83.15 : .'.. $3.85 ; •' . 85 ; l-in., $7.20 : 
1}, $10.05; 1\, $12.20; 2-in.. 816.85. 
Extra heavy pipe, plain ends, are quoted 
per 100 feet as follows: Black, i, $4.20; 
V, 85.25 ; l-in., 87.55 ; 1 ',. $10.55 ; 1$, 
$12.75; 2-in.. $17.60. Galvanized. 
$5.20; I, $6.65; l-in., 89.55; 1|. $13.25: 
H, $16: 2-in., 821.9(1. For threads and 
couplings 5 per cent, is added. 

TEMPLATES— There is a fairly good 
trade beine- done in this line and prices 
have been steady. Charcoals are quoted 
at $4.75 to $5.25 per box and cokes. 
84.25 per box. 

CANADA PLATES.- The scarcity of 
Canada plates which began to be felt on 
the local market has been considerably 
relieved by fairly large shipments by the 
steamer Montfort. No quotable change 
has been reported, and we quote : 52's, 
$2.70 to $2.80 ; 60's, 82. 85 to $2.90 ; 75's, 
82.80 to 82. So ; full polished, $3.75, and 
galvanized, $4.25 to $4.35 ; galvanized, 
(in's. $4.45 to $4.55. 

STEEL. Trade is quiet and the market 
shows no change. We quote as follows ; 
Sleighshoe, $2.10; tire, 82.20; bar, $2.0* 
spring, $2.85 ; reeled machinery, $2.75 ; 
toocalk, $2.70. 

SHEET STEEL.— There is no improve 
ment in this market, which continues 
quiet at unchanged prices. We quote 
Nos. 10 to 20, 82.511; 3-16, $2.50 ; \. 
5-16, and |, 82.10. 

TOOL STEEL. There is nothing of im- 
portance to note in the market for tool 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



steel. Trade is quiet and no quotable 
change has occurred. We quote : Black 
Diamond, 8c; Sanderson's, 8 to 12c, 
according to grade ; Jessop's, 13c; Leon- 
ard's, 7.1c; Jonas & Oolver's, 8 to 15c ; 
" Air Hardening," 30 to 50c 

TEJRNE PLATES— Some business is 
doing this week, but the demand is irre- 
gular and the market, in general, is 
quiet. ST. 50 is the price quoted. 

COIL CHAIN.— Jobbers report a fair 
(inland for chain this week at unchanged 
prices. Our quotations are as fol- 
lows : No. 6, I2.\c; No. 5, KMc; No. 1. 
lUc; No. 3, 9£c.; £-inch, 7£e. per lb.; 
5-16, §5 ; 5-16 exact, 85. "25 ; g, §4.25 ; 
7-16, $4.05 ; $, £3.1)5 ; U-16, §3.S5 ; |, 
§3.55 ; i\ §3.50 ; %, §3.45 ; 1-inch, §3.45. 
In carload lots an allowance of 10c. is 
made. 

SHEET ZINC— Nothing new has oc- 
curred in this market. Trade is rather 
quirt, and the price remains at §5.85 to 
86.25. 

ANTIMONY.— In this line business is 
yerj quiet and the market is featureless. 
We quote III,-. 

ZINC SPELTER.— The demand for this 
has not improved. The price is still 5c 

SOLDER.— We quote 18c. for bar solder 
and 20c. for wire solder. Business con- 
tinues brisk in both lines. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

With the exception of a little flurry in 
paris green, which has been in active de- 
mand for the past few days, nothing un- 
usual has occurred in paints and oils. A 
inccting of white lead manufacturers was 
held, but the price to the retail trade re- 
mains unchanged. The liquid paint trade 
is keeping up wonderfully well, and manu- 
facturers are as busy to-day as they were 
in April, a very unusual state of affairs. 
The sudden arrival of warm, dry weather, 
has apparently stimulated the business 
all over Canada. Coach colors, enamels, 
roofing paints and varnishes are all feel- 
ing the effect of the growing time, and 
an optimistic feeling prevails in this 
branch of the hardware trade. Linseed 
oil and turpentine have been steady 
throughout the week. We quote : 

WHITE LEAD— Best brands, Govern- 
ment standard, §5.87£ ; No. 1, §5.50 ; 
No. 2, $5,124 ; No. 3, §4.75 ; No. 4, 
§4.374 all f.o.b. Montreal. 

DRY WHITE LEAD.— §5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, §5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— Pure dry, in 
casks, 6£c; in 100-lb. kegs, 6fc. No. 1 
zinc, in casks, 5£c; in 100-lb. kegs, 5|c. 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25 lb. irons, 8c; No. 1, 7c; No.2, 6c 
' PUTTY— We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
SI. 00 per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 
$2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., §2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200-lb. kegs or boxes, 
§2.40 ; in tins, §2.55 to §2.65 ; in less 
than 100-lb. lots, §3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guclph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. higher, 
f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL.— Casks, 7c; 100- 
lb. kegs, 7{c; smaller quantities, 8£c. 
► RFD LEAD. — Genuine red lead, in casks, 
§1.50; in 100-lb. kegs, §4.75; in less 
quantities. §5.75 per 100 tb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, §4.25 : kegs, §4.50, and 
smaller quantities. §5.50. 

LITHARGE— Ground, casks, 5c ; less 
quantities, 54c; flake litharge, casks, 
85.25 : smalls. 85.75 per 100 lb. 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, 77c; boiled, 80c 
In 5 to 9 bbls.. Ic. less. Terms, net cash 
in 30 days. Delivered in Ontario, be- 



r 

! 

I 
i 
I 

i 



The Handsome Effect 
Of Our Sheet Metal Fronts. 

Makes them wonderfully popular, either for new buildings or improving 
shabby exteriors 

We make them complete, including Cornices, Door and Window Caps, 
etc. — a most durable, economical finish, giving fireproof protection, as well 
as fine appearance. 

These, and our improved metal building materials for exterior and 
interior use, are favorably known throughout Canada for their reliable merit 
— a merit we intend to maintain. So you stand certain of satisfied customers 
when you sell our goods. 

A look through our catalogue will be profitably interesting to anyone 
in the trade. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited, 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS, 
TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



I 

f 

T 
f 

f 
f 
f 
f 

! 

f 
f 
f 
t 
f 
f 
f 



tween Montreal and Oshawa, at 2c. per 
gal. advance. 

TURPENTINE.— Single barrels, 08c; 2 
to 4 barrels, G7c Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 

SHELLAC VARNISH. -Pure white, 
§2.35 to §2.45 ; orange, §2.25 to §2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS.— §1.20 to §1.45 per 
gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— 8f to 9£c. in wholesale 
lots, and ^c additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL.— 48 to 50c 

COD OIL— 35 to 37$c 

PARIS GREEN— Petroleum, bbls., 
16jc. per lb.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 
100-lb. drums, 17£c; 25-lb. drums, 18c; 
1-Ib. packages, 18^c; -£-Ib. packages, 
20£c; l-tb. tins, 19£c; £-tb. tins, 2Hc. 
f.o.b.. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of de- 
livery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The only change in price to report in 
this market is on heavy copper and wire. 
which is -|c. lower per lb. Copper has 
been very weak of late ; supplies have 

I ii large, and there is no demand. Iron 

remains quiet and unchanged in price. 
Zinc is in good demand, and there is a 
better feeling in red brass. We quote as 
follows : Heavy copper and wire, 10c per 
lb.; light copper, 8c; heavy red brass, 
10$c; heavy yellow, 9c; light brass, 5c; 
lead, 2 to 2£c; zinc. 2£c; iron No. 1, 
wrought, §15 ; No. 2, §7 per ton ; ma- 
chinery scrap. §lfi ; stove plate, §12 : 
malleable and steel, §5 ; mixed country 
rags. GO to 70c per 100 tb. ; old rubbers. 
f> to 6£c. per lb. 

GLASS. 

The market is still quiet. The trade 
have all purchased their supplies and 
nothing but a few sorting orders are 
being received. Our quotations are as 
follows: First break, 50 feet. §2.10; 
second. §2.20 for 50 feet ; first break. 100 
feet. §1: =econd break. §4.20; third 
break. 81.70 : fourth break. §4.95. 
HIDES. 

There has been no quotable change in 
this market, which is quiet and steady. 



We quote as follows : No. 1 hides, 10c; 
No. 2, 9c; No. 3, 8c. Calfskins, 10 to 
['2c; lambskins, 30c. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Black tea kettles are 5c higher. 

Picks have advanced about 50c. per 
dozen. 

Wire netting for 1903 will be from 5 to 
15 per cent, lower. 

" Monarch " horse nails are now dis- 
counted at 70 and 5 per cent., instead of 
GO 2 3 per cent. off. 



ONTARIO MARKETS 

Toronto, August I, L902. 
HARDWARE. 

THE midsummer season has quieted 
down business in hardware in 
common with other lines, but a 
fair number of sorting-up orders con- 
tinue to come in by mail. The demand 
for rope continues good and some job- 
bers are experiencing a scarcity in liar 
vest rope sizes, which they find it difficult 
to relieve by reason of slow deliveries 
from the factories. Trade in horse nails 
is increasing, but the prices of these are 
still very low. Horseshoes are also ac- 
tive, and the same applies to harvest 
tools, the principal demand for these 
lieinu in forks, scythes and snaths. The 
season for lawn mowers is over. Eave- 
troughing continues in good demand and. 
stocks in the hands of jobbers have be- 
come light by reason of the slowness of 
the manufacturers in tilling their orders. 
Canadian Portland cement has advanced 
15c. per barrel. 

BARB WIRE.— There is quite a demand 
this week for barb wire, and some call is 
reported for hay-baling wire. Prices are 
unchanged. We quote §2.65 in carlots and 
for less than carlots. §2. 77 k f.o.b. Cleve 
land. From stock, Toronto, §3. 

GALVANIZED WIRE— There is still 
some call for galvanized wire, and our 
quotations are as follows : Nos. G, 7 
and 8, §3.50 to §3.85 per 100 lb., accord- 
ing to quantity ; No. 9, §2.85 to §3.15 ; 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



No. 10, §3.60 to §3.95; No. 11, §3.70 to 
$4.10 ; No. 12, §3 to §3.30 ; No. 13, §3.10 
to §3.40 ; No. 14, §4.10 to §4.50 ; No. 15, 
§4.00 to §5.50 ; No. 16, §4.85 to §5.35. 
Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. Cleveland are 
<l noted at §2.52^ in less than carlots and 
12c. less' for carlots of 15 tons. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— The volume 
oi trade in this line continues moderate 
at unchanged prices. We quote the 
base price as follows : §2.60 per 100 
lb. Oiling, 10c. ; coppering, 60c, and tin- 
ning, §2 per 100 lb. extra. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Mont- 
real, with freights equalized on those 
points. 

FINE STEEL WIRE.— Trade in this 
line keeps steady and prices are unchan- 
ged. The discount is 22£ per cent. 

WIRE NAILS.— These are still meeting 
with a steady demand.. -We quote the 
base price as follows : §2.55 for 
less than carlots and §2.50 for carlots. 
The delivery points are Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, London, Gananoque and Montreal. 

CUT NAILS. — A small trade in tut 
nails is reported this week with no change 
in prices. We quote : Cut nails, §2.15 
per keg and $2.-37$ for carlots. 

HORSE NAILS.— Business in these is 
increasing, but prices are still low. The 
manufacturers claim that there is no pro- 
lit in making them. The great number 
of manufacturers engaged in making these 
keeps the prices low. Base price is quoted 
as follows : " C" brand, oval head, 
50 and 7$ per cent.; on " M " brand, 50, 
10 and 5 per cent.; " Monarch," 60 2-3 
per cent. Countersunk head, 60 percent. 
HORSESHOES.— Quite a little business 
is doing in these for the fall trade. A 
manufacturer of horseshoes in the United 
States' had a large quantity of slightly 
damaged goods which he endeavored to 
dispose of in" this country, but he is re- 
ported to have found the market here 
too low to do business. Prices in the 
United States, it is claimed, are con- 
siderably higher than they are here. 
Our quotations are now as follows : 
Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, §3.60 ; snow shoes, 
§3.85 : light steel shoes, §3.70 ; feather- 
weight (all sizes), §4.95 ; iron shoes, No. 
1 and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all sizes), §3.85 ; snow shoes, §4 ; light 
steel shoes, §3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), §4.P5. 

SCREWS.— The demand for these still 
continues in excess of the supply, and the 
market is strong. We quote the dis- 
counts as follows : Flat head bright. 
87$ and 10 per cent.; round head 
bright. 82£ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 65 per cent., and flat head bronze, 
70 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. Trade in these 
is still brisk, but supplies arc limited. 
Discounts are : Iron rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent.; iron burrs, 55 per cent.; cop- 
per rivets, with usual proportion of 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper burrs alone,' 
30 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS.- Business in these 
is keeping up well, and our quotations 
are now as follows : Carriage bolts. 
common (§1.00 list), 50 per cent. ; 
carriage bolts, full square (§2.40 list), 55 
per cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
(s:i list), 55 per cent.; machine bolts, all 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws, 
cone points, 66 2-3 per cent.; elevator 
shaft and whiflletree bolts, 50 per cent. 



SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS — 
A good many orders are coming for- 
ward for the cheaper grades of doors. 
We quote : Walnut, stained, 3-inch style, 
$6.80 per dozen ; stained, yelrow, ifi ; 
natural color, oil finish, §8.15 ; 4-inch 
style, 20c. extra per dozen. Window s : 
No. 0, $1.60; No. I, $1.70; No. 2, $1.95; 
No. 3, §2.10; No. 4, §2.50 per dozen. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH .-There is still 
some sorting-up business being done in 
green wire cloth, but the trade of the 
season will soon be over. W ; e quote the 
base price at *L37.', per 100 square feet. 

SPADES AND SHOVELS— A fair sort- 
ing-up trade continues in these. The dis- 
count is 40 and 5 per cent. 

ROLE. — A good trade is doing in all 
lines of rope, especially in hayfork rope, 
some sizes of which are scarce. The prices 
continue, unchanged. We quote as fol- 
lows : Lure manila, 15c; British manila, 
13c; sisal, I2$c; lathyarn, single, lie. 
double. II Ac; sisal bed cord, 3-cord, IS 
feet, 65c.; 60 feet, 80c; 72 feet, 95c per 
dozen. 

BINDER TWINE.— A good demand for 
binder twine continues from all quarters 
of the country, and the available sup- 
plies are rapidly diminishing. The indi- 
cations this season are that owing to so 
much damp weather, that has been pre- 
valent all summer, there will be lots of 
stalk to the grain, and this will require 
and extra quantity of binder twine to be 
used. Our quotations are as follows : 
" Blue Ribbon," 650 ft., 15c; " Red 
Cap," 600 ft,, 14c; " Tiger," 580 ft., 
13c; sisal, 500 ft., ll$c. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— A good number of 
sorting-up orders are coming in from all 
directions, and forks, scythes and snaths 
are at present in brisk demand. The dis- 
count is still 60 per cent. 

i:.\\ KTROUGH, ETC.— A heavy de- 
mand for eavetroughing continues, and 
jobbers find it difficult to fill all then- 
orders owing to the slowness of the fac- 
tories in making deliveries. Quotations 
are as follows : Eavetrough, §3.10 per 
100 square feet, for 10-inch, and conduc- 
tor pipe at §4 for 3-inch, and §5.25 for 
4-inch. 

BUILDING PAPER— A good trade is 
keeping up in building paper. In fact, 
all building materials are selling well. 
The market is steady. The base price is as 
follows : Dry sheathing, grey or straw, 
35c. per roll ; tar sheathing, grey or 
straw, 45c per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per 
roll ; tarred fibre, 60c per roll. 

HARVEST WHIPS— A good trade is 
doing in whips of all kinds, including 
harvest whips. 

LOULTRV NETTING.— Quite a number 
of sorting-up orders are being forwarded 
to outside points. 

TINWARE AND ENAMELLED WAUL. 
— A large amount of tinware continues to 
be sold, and a large movement in 
enamelled wan' is reported to continue. 

SPORTING GOODS.— A good demand is 
reported For guns and rifles, and trade in 
ammunition is on the increase. 

CEMENT. There has been an advance 
of 15c. per barrel in Canadian Portland 
cement. The manufacturers arc finding a 
greater demand for cement than they at 
present can attend to and are refusing 
orders continually. A very active in- 
quiry keeps up. We quote as follows: 
Canadian Portland. $2.40 to $3 and Can 
adian hydraulic, $1.35 to $1.60 per bbl. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 



WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

* 6* U ' sS ••&? Lugert Variety, 
VXif i lZ^ ^'^/L Toilet, Band, Electric Power) 

/ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep- Shearing Machine. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

mn> FOE CATALOGUE TO 

A»rleu Skewer ■tf. Co., Suku, H.H..D8A 




V 



Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Communily Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIA6AEA FALLS, ONT. 



An 
Experience. 

One of the largest 
operators on the 
North Shore after 
one year's experi- 
ence of CROWN 
JEWEL AXES 
in his shanties is 
so satisfied he will 
not consider buy- 
ing any other. 



Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont 

W. L. Haldimand, Jr., Montreal Agent. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



METALS. 

There has been no change in the general 
metal business this week. Trade is not 
so heavy as during the busier seasons of 
the year, but some business continues 
without ninth large buying. The United 
States pig iron market has steadied it- 
self, its upward career being checked by 
importations of that product from other 
countries. The outside copper markets 
are quiet; and the English and United 
St^ites tin markets are easier. There has 
been a slight reduction of 10c. in some 
cases in all dull and half-polished Can- 
ada plates. 

PIG IKON.— The market locally, is still 
strong. The market of the United States 
is steady and little inclination is mani- 
fested by dealers to buy for future de- 
livery. We quote on track, Toronto, as 
follows : No. 1 foundry, $21 and No. 2. 
820.50. 

STEEL BOILER PLATES.— Trade in 
this line is keeping up well, and the tone 
of the local market is firm. We quote : 
Steel boiler plates, |1.80 for carload lots 
on track, Toronto. 

STEEL BEAMS.— A good business con- 
tinues in these. We quote : Steel beams, 
from stock, $2.75 and $2 per 100 in car- 
load lots on track. 

STEEL KAILS.— These are quoted at 
$30 per ton for steam railways and $30 
I er ton for electric railways. 

TOOL STEEL.— A good local business 
keeps up in tool steel. We quote as fol- 
lows : "BC" and " Black Diamond," 10 
to lie; Jessop's, Morton's and Firth's, 
lie; Jonas & Colver's, 8 to 15c; ditto, 
" Air Hardening," 30 to 50c; Chas. Leon- 
ard's, 8 to 9c; Park's " Silver," 12 to 
Hi'.; Park's Special, 15 to 20c. 

MILD STEEL.— The business doing in 
this line continues fair. 

SPKING STEEL.— A fair trade is re- 
ported in spring steel. 

BOILEK TUBES.— The demand is fair 
and the market steady. 

BAK IKON.— Stocks of bar iron on the 
local market continue small and the de- 
mand is in excess of the supply. The 
United Slates markets are steady. Our 
quotations are as follows : $1.95 to 
$2.05 base. Extras cut to length while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c. per 100 lb.; 
1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 
20c; over 20 ft. by special agreement, 
according to length and size. 

BLACK SHEETS.— There is no change 
in this line and a fair amount of busi- 
ness is being done. We quote : Common. 
$3.15 for 28 gauge and dead flat, $2.5(1 
for 20 gauge. 

CANADA PLATES.— Some business con- 
tinues in these. Some jobbers have re- 
duced the prices of all dull and half- 
polished Canada plates 10c. We quote: All 
dull. $2.90 to $3; half-polished, $3 to 
$3.10, and all bright, $3.75. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS.— A brisk de- 
mand for these continues. The base price 
iik case lots is : Queen's Head, $1.50 
t<>r 28 gauge ; American, $4.40 for 29 
gauge ; Bell brand, $4.20 for 28 gauge. 

TIN. — This metal is quiet on the local 
market. The London tin market was 
irregular and the New York market dull. 
There was little buying on either mar- 
ket. Prices continue unchanged at $32 
to $33 per 100 lb. 

TINf'LATKS.— These have been more 
actixe during the week. We quote : Char- 



NICHOLSON F-IL.EI 

Dominion Works, Port Hope, Canada. 

Are now producing six hundred dozen-First Quality Files and Rasps daily, which are being shipped to 
■all parts of the Dominion, and may be obtained from prominent hardware merchants who carry a full 
stock of these goods at reasonable prices. 

Canadians DEMAND and WILL HAVE superior goods. 






I ! " ■- '• - '• ■- - 1 



#§#§§ 






12 in. Rasp Smooth, 



12 in. Rasp 2d Cut. 



12 in. Rasp Bistard, 









^^^J§^ 




12 In. Double Cut Smooth, 12 in. Double Cut 2d Cut. 12 in. Double Cut Bastard, 



12 in, Double Cut Coarse. 







12 in. Single Cut Smooth 12 in, Single Cut 2d Cut. 12 in. Single Cut Bastard. 12 in Single Cut Coarse. 



THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 




THE CELEBRATED 

NATIONAL CUTLERV CO. SHEARS 



Acknowledged the best and fully warranted. 
Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



Tailors' Shears, 

Trimmers, 

Ladies' 

Scissors, 

Barbe s' 

Shears, 

Tinners' 

Snips, 




DECATUR, BULL & C0.,montr'»l 



coal, $4.75 to $5 per box and cokes, $4.25 
per box. 

OOPPER.. — Trade in ingot copper is 
slack, but the demand for sheets has im- 
proved. The outside markets are quiet 
and steady. We quote : Ingot copper, *l I 
pei- Kilt tb and sheet copper, $22 to $23. 

BRASS. — This metal continues in good 
demand. We quote the discount at 15 per 
cent. 

PIG LEAD. — A fair demand for pig lead 
is reported at unchanged prices. We quote 
pig lead at $3,511 (,, $3.75 and bar, $5. 



IRON PIPE.— An error was made last 
week in saying the trade discount had 
been changed from 4 to TV per cent, on 
all sizes up to 2 inches. The discount re- 
mained the same as before. We quote per 
100 ft. : £-in., $2.40 ; g-in., $2.65 ; i-in., 
$2.85 ; f-in., $3.65 ; 1-in., $5.20 ; H-in., 
$7.35 ; H-in., $8.95 ; 2-in., $12.55 ; gal- 
vanized, 1-inch, $7.20. Discount of I pef 
cent, oil page 37 is for carlots. 

ZINC SPELTER.— There is some de- 
mand for zinc spelter in small lots. We 

quote 5 to tie. per lb. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ZINC SHEETS.— Trade in this line .•on- 
tinues -steady at unchanged prices. We 
quote : Cask K>i<. xr> tn $6.25 and part 
■ ask-. $6.25 to 16.50. 

SOLDER. — An active business in this 
line continues. 

ANTIMONY. -The market for antimony 
is quiet. We quote 819.50 per 100 It). 

RAINTS AND OILS. 

During the week trade in paints and oils 
has dropped off considerably and the market 
is quiet. Raw and boiled linseed oils and 
spirits of turpentine are unchanged. The 
market in England for linseed oil has 
increased in strength and the spirits are 
stronger on the primary markets. The 
manufacturers of white lead ground in oil 
have increased the rebate on leads to the 
jobber. From this out until the end of the 
year 5 p. c. rebate will be granted on all lots 
under a ton, and on from 1 to 5 tons the re- 
batewill be 10 per cent. A little sorting up 
business continues in mixed paints, and the 
other lines of paints are quiet. We quote 
as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $5 87^ ; No. 1, #5.50; No. 2, 
$5.12X1 No. 3, $4-75; No - 4. #4 37'A i n 
packages of 25 lb. and upwards ; %c. per 
lb. extra will be charged for 12^ lb. pack- 
ages ; genuine dry white lead in casks, 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5 to $5.12^; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 
J5.50; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., #4; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., #4 50. 

Litharge— Genuine, 6 to 6^c 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7% to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Shingle Stain — In 5-gal. lots, 60c. to 
$1.20 per gal. 

Benzine and Gasoline — Benzine, in 
barrel lots, 17c. per gal.; gasoline, ordinary, 
20c, and engine, 21c. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Paris White- — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 
$2.25 to $2.35 ; white, $2.35 to $2.45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, 10c. extra. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.40 ; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., $2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2 90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 
per gal.; No. I, $1.10 per gal. 



Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9X to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to io^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil- Raw, 1 to 2 barrels, 79c. ; 
boiled, 82c. ; 3 to 5 barrels, raw, 78c; 
boiled, 81c. ; 6 to 9 barrels, raw, 76c. ; boiled, 
79c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamilton and 
London, 2c. less. All quantities of 10 bbls. 
and over of linseed oil, sold only f.o.b. 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Guelph. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 69c. ; 2 to 
4 barrels, 68c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5 c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

A fair amount of business in glass con- 
tinues for this time of the year. prices are 
unchanged. We quote as follows : Under 
26 in., $4.45 ; 26 to 40 in., #4.65 ; 41 
to 50 in., $5.10; 51 to 60 in., $5.35 ; 
61 to 70 in., $5 75 ; 71 to 80, $6.25 ; 81 to 
85, $7 ; 86 to 90, $7.75 ; Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London. Terms, 4 months, or 3 
per cent. 30 days. Discount off pane price 
l' st > 33/4 P er cent. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

Trade in this line keeps fairly active. 
Scrap zinc is weaker, while lead is stronger. 
We quote: Heavy copper and wire, io»^c. per 
lb.; light copper, 8c. per lb. ; heavy red brass, 
ioc; heavy yellow brass, 8 to 8^c; light 
brass, 5c; lead, 2#to 2j£c; scrap zinc, 
2#c. ; iron, No. 1 wrought, $14 per 
net ton ; No. 2 wrought, $6 ; machinery 
cast scrap, $14; stove plate, $10; malleable 
and steel, $6 ; old rubbers, 6c per lb., and 
country mixed rags, 50c per 100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — Trade continues quiet at un- 
changed prices, and we quote as follows : 
No. 1 green, 7>£c; No. 2 green, 6j£c; 
No. 1 green, steers, 8^c; No. 2 green, 
steers, 7 x / t c.\ cured, %% to %%c. 

Skins — The skin market is also in- 
active. Our quotations are as follows : 
Veal skins, 6 to 14 lb. inclusive, No. 1, 
ioc; No. 2, 8c; do., 15 to 20 lb. inclusive, 
No. 1, 9c; No. 2, 7c; deacons (dairies), 
60 to 70c each ; lambskins, 30c; shearl- 
ings, 25c 

Wool — The receipts are small and the 
market is firmer. We quote fleece wool, 
13c, and unwashed, 7c per lb. 

Tallow — The arrivals are limited and 

the prices are firm. We quote 6% to 6y£c. 

per lb. 

COAL. 

There have been no advances made so 
far either by the strikers or the mine owners 
to effect a settlement. Latest reports from 
the mining regions seem, however, to indi- 
cate that work will soon be resumed by the 
miners. The news of rioting at the mining 



regions seem to show that matters there are 
coming to a head, and the belief is becom- 
ing general that an early settlement will be 
arranged. Quotations are as follows : Soft 
coal, $2 to $4 per ton. 

PETROLEUM. 
A good summer trade is reported in 
petroleum, and prices are unchanged. We 
quote as follows : Pratt's Astral,* 17 
to I7j£c in bulk (barrels extra); American 
water white, i7j£ to 18c in barrels; 
Photogene, 17 to I7j£c ; Sarnia water 
white, 16^ to 17c in barrels ; Sarnia prime 
white, 15 to is 'Ac. in barrels. 



market notes. 

Canadian Portland cement has been ad- 
vanced 15c per bbl. 

The discount on cast iron fittings is now 
50 and 10 per cent., instead of 60c 

The discount on malleable fittings has 
been changed from 35 to 30 per cent. 

Jobbers have reduced the prices of all 
dull and half polished Canada plates ioc 



ORDERS FOR SHELF BOXES. 

Cote, Boivin & Co., of Chicoutimi, Que., 
have just placed their fourth order for shelf 
boxes and cabinet. L. A. Levesque, Ville 
Marie, Que., is equipping his new store 
with J. S. Bennett's shelf boxes and shelv- 
ing. 

BUSINESS IN ANNAPOLIS VALLEY. 

A well-known business man of Kentville, 
the pretty little town in the Annapolis Valley, 
Nova Scotia, writes : " Although the sea- 
son has been so queer the Valley looks well. 
Business seems very good all over this 
county, although crop prospects are not at 
high water mark." 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. T. S. Sevanston, of Lewis Bros. & 
Co., Montreal, passed through Toronto on 
his way home on his vacation. 

Mr. Albert H. Hough, of Toronto, re- 
presentative of the Montreal Rolling Mills 
Co., is holidaying in Montreal. 

Mr. J. T. Kinsman, foreman of the Fletcher 
Mfg. Co., Toronto, has just come success- 
fully through an operation for cancer. 

Mr. C. W. Sprague, of The National 
Cutlery Co., Philadelphia, Pa., was^ in 
Montreal calling on the trade during the 
week. 

Mr. W. H. Carrick, of the Gurney 
Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto, has just 
returned from a trip to the Maritime Pro- 
vinces, during which he spent most of his 
time at Digby and Wolfville, N.S. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



Stove Pi|>e and Elbows 




i 

"Empire" 
Patent Stove Pipes 

Put up in Crates of 25 
lengths each. 



A FGW RGdSOnS wh y the y are winners. 

Long in the throat — which insures perfect draft. 

Flat in the crimp — easily cleaned. 

Holds no dirt, inside or out. 

Adjustable — readily fitting all makes of pipe. 

Saves time and labor in putting up. Makes 

neatest work. 
Crated in bundles of one dozen — safe delivery. 

insured. 
Polished are made of Dark Blue Steel. 
Common are made of Dark Black Steel, 

5 — 6 — 7 — 8 inches. 




Standard Pleated 
Elbows 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited 



MONTREAL. 




Winning Favor in Australia 

"The engineering merchants here consider your Solid Box Blacksmiths' 
Vises superior in quality and workmanship to any they have ever handled. 
They say they are remarkably suitable, and give perfect satisfaction." 

[Extract from letter received from our Australian Agents located in Melbourne.] 



Our facilities are unexcelled for making 



Blacksmiths' and Machinists' Vises 

Modern equipment and methods, high-grade material and workmanship 
are combined in our plant, producing 

THE BEST VISES MADE 



Lamplaugh & McNaughton 



CANADIAN SALES AGENTS 



19 Dc Bresoles St., Montreal 

Manufactured by 



THE COLUMBIAN HARDWARE COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

NEW CATALOGUE JUST ISSUED WRITE FOR IT. 




30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



BUILDING PERMITS IN TORONTO. 

DURING the week the following per- 
mits were taken out in the office 
of Building- Inspector Edward 
Copping : Wm. McBean, six attached 
stores and dwellings, three-storey brick 
and stone, corner of Dundas and Glad- 
stone ave., for SIS. 000 : Bank of Toronto, 
two-storey stone and brick bank, corner 
of Kino- and Bathurst. for $15,000 ; Dr. 
S. P. May, three attached two-storey and 
attic brick dwelling's, near Parliament 
street, on Winchester, for 8,(5,000 : Dr. E. 
It. Langrell, two-storey detached brick 
front, roughcast dwelling, 17-J, Spruce 
street, for 551,200; J. Davis, stone and 
brick foundation and brick-veneered 
dwelling, 110 Hazelton ave.. for $1,900: 
Church of Christ, for two-storey brick 
church, near College street, east side of 
Bathurst street, for $6,000; Jas. Mc- 
Bean, alterations to dwelling. brick- 
veneered, corner of Queen and Greenwood 
ave.. for S700 ; James Wilkie, 2.1-storey 
brick and roughcast dwelling. 32] Shaw 
sireet, for $2,300; Wm. Allison, one- 
storey dwelling, brick front, roughcast 
sides and back. 141 Jones ave.. for §500; 
Jas. Laing, brick front to dwelling, 300 
Givens street, for $600; Walter Nash, foi 
pair semi-detached 2^-storey brick dwell- 
ings, near College street, east side of 
Beatrice street, for $4,000; James Russel. 
two-storey brick detached dwelling near 
Dupont street, west side of Palmerston 
ave.. for SI ,000 ; W. Revnolds, for a two- 
storey frame and brick cellar dwelling. 
10'.) I 'Queen street east, for SI .400 ; Ed. 
J. Roberts, pair semi-detached two-storey 
roughcast.- brick cellar and brick-veneered 
dwellings, Hamilton street, near Elliott 
street , for $900 : Mrs. M. Stewart Thomp- 
son, two-slorey and attic, two pair semi- 
detached brick and stone dwellings, on 
Brunswick ave.. near Bloor, for §12,000 ; 
Mrs. Johanna Duff, two-storey brick 
dwelling on Columbus street, for $800 ; 
Allan Coskie, two-storey and attic brick- 
veneered dwelling, stone foundation, near 
Carlaw ave.. on Bain ave., for SI ,000 ; 
:\]rs. Siddal, 2-J-storey brick residence, 
corner Roxborough and Scarth Road, for 
SI. 1100; Isaac W. W. Plewes, two-storey 
attic and brick detached dwelling, Spa- 
dina Road, near Bernard ave., for $4,500 ; 
Jno. E. Hoare, for pair of 2? r storey 
brick and stone dwellings. 34-36 Albany 
ave., near Minor street west, for SO. 000. 



BUILDING PERMITS IN OTTAWA. 

During the week eleven building per 
mils, amounting to the value of $17,500, 
were taken out in the office of Building 

Inspector Pratt, of Ottawa. They were 

all for new residences or alterations, and 
were as follows : A. Kerr, frame dwell 
big, Kenny street. $750; 1). Doherty, 
solid brick addition to workshop, Bes 
sercr street, $350; George Johnston. 
brick-veneered dwelling, Stewart street, 
$800; W. II. Bishop, veneered dwelling. 
.,,i Gilmour street, for $1 ,100 ; ('has. 
Boivin, for a frame dwelling on 

McLeod street, $800 ; Dr. W. C, Cousens, 
alterations to dwelling. Slater street. 
$1,000; Mr. Wilson, brick-veneered dwell- 
ing, Coopei street, $2,200 ; Mrs. J. K. 



Forbes, brick-veneered dwelling, Carrier 
street, $3,800; James Wilson, solid brick 
dwelling, Somerset street, $2,500; Wm. J. 
Davidson, two brick-veneered dwellings. 
Lisgar street, $3,000 : W. Green, frame 
kitchen, Turner street, $200. 

BUILDING NOTES. 

Ottawa is to build a million dollar 
hotel this fall. 

Wilfrid Mercier, Montreal, has secured 
the contract for building the new green 
house on Mountain Park, for &2.035. 

The Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Com- 
pany propose building a machine shop 
at North Sydney, which will give em- 
ployment to a large number of men. 
Plans have already been prepared. 

James C. Johnstone, contractor, Corn- 
wall, Ont., has secured the contract for 
the buildinnr of a new winn-. 38 x 26 feet, 
to the Cornwall General Hospital. The 
wing will have three storeys, exclusive of 
basement. 

The Cape Breton Silicate Brick Com- 
pany has let the contract for a building 
to be erected at the lower end of the 
town. The building- will be 100 feet long. 
50 feet wide and two storeys high. The 
company expects to start manufacturing 
bv October. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

Campbell Bros.. Cornwall, Ont., have 
secured the contract for the plumbing and 
heating of the new wing of the Cornwall 
General Hospital. 

R. Bigley, Queen street east, Toronto, 
will instal the new combination heating- 
apparatus of hot water and hot air for 
J. B. Reid, Bloor street. 

J. W. Walsh, Hamilton, will do the 
plumbing and put in the steam heating 
in the new public school on Mary street ; 
also in the Nurses' Home. 

Dr. Kennedy, of Guelph. has awarded 
the contract for the hot water heating 
and the plumbing of his new residence to 
J. W. Walsh, of Hamilton. 

Minims, of Spadina ave.. Toronto, has 
secured the contract for the lighting and 
olumbinp- of dwelling for J. N. Sampson. 
Dnfferin and Dundas streets. 

Eiddes & Hogarth. 122 King street 
east. Toronto, plumbers, steam and gas- 
fitters, have secured the contract for 
plumbing and lig-hting four houses on 
Isabella street for Mr. Bryce. 

Lessard & Harris. Montreal, report the 
following pl'unhinp-. heatinf and roofing 
contracts : Henrv Birks & Co., manufac- 
turing jewelers, buildhl"- ; Catholic Home 
for Tncurables, Notre Dame des Neiges ; 
North British and Mercantile Insurance 
Company, building. 

A. Rogers & Co., Hamilton, report the 
following contracts: J. Stuart, two 
dwellings on Mark-land street, plumbing ; 
Dr. Leslie's dwelling. Main street, com- 
bination svstem, hot air and hot water; 
Schmidt House. St. James street, com- 
bination system: Mr. Steele, Dundas. 
plumbing ; Bank- of Hamilton. Orange 
ville. steam heating; T. W. Bsflrry, 
dwelling. 85 Robinson street, hot-water 
In. Hoe. n nil ol n ml ling : Mrs. Osborne, 
dwellino-, heating and plumbing. 



BUILDING IN WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg is experiencing one of the 
greatest building booms in its history. 
According to the figures furnished by 
Building Inspector Rogers, the value ol 
the buildings constructed to date amounts 
to $1,622,800. This is $400,000 in excess 
of last year, which closely approached a 
record breaker. The buildings are all 
of a good class, and construction is not 
confined to any particular section of the 
city. A large addition has been made to 
the Winnipeg Grain Exchange building. 



BATH TUB AND SOIL PIPE FACTORY. 

H. T. Bush and A. E. Pipher, of De- 
troit, are negotiating with the Ottawa 
City Council for a factory location and 
site for the manufacture of a line of 
porcelain enamelled bath tubs, soil pipe 
and soil - pipe fittings. They will em- 
ploy approximately 100 men the first 
year, with the possibility of doubling 
this number in two years ; all men — no 
boys or girls. Enamel sifters, pattern 
men and moulders' day's pay average a 
very high rate. They write : 

" What we need is about two acres of 
land, a building 100 x 250 feet, two 
storeys in front and back about 100 feet; 
balance to be strictly foundry building, 
with 150 horse-power. We must have tin- 
best of railway facilities for shipping. 
with railway siding to warehouse, and 
water transportation if possible. While 
we anticipate starting in the smallest 
way possible, which would lie a melt 
from 10 to 12 tons per day ; that is, 
would approximate about 3,000 tons in 
and out, or a total of 6,000 tons for the 
fust year, with the possibility of doubl- 
ing this tonnage inside of two years." 



A REMODELLED HOTEL. 

.The Queen Hotel, Halifax, has lately 
been undergoing extensive improvements. 
Manager Fairbanks has expended $20,000 
in refitting and remodelling. 

The contract for the hot water heating 
was one of the largest single contracts 
ever let in the city of Halifax. 140 radi- 
ators, equal to over 5,000 square feet of 
heating surface, were required, and the 
eost was upwards of $5,000. 

New- plumbing has also been installed, 
in the most scientific and sanitary man- 
ner. Steel porcelain lined baths have 
been placed throughout the entire hotel. 
Drainage and ventilation have also re 
reived special attention, and all the base- 
ment has been concreted. 

The incandescent system of electric 
lighting is of the most perfect descrip- 
tion and was installed at a cost of 
$2,000. Electric fans are also placed 
different parts of the building. 

Throughout the entire building only the 
best and most expensive hotel furniture 
has been used, and everything is new. 

The contractors who did the work were 
S. M. Brookfield, the rotunda ; James 
Dempster iV Co., staircase; Crump & 
I'errier. hot water heating ; Cordon & 
Keith, furniture ; David Roche, painting 
and paper hanging; John Starr & Son. 
electric light. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



PAINT 
SPECIALTIES 



RAMSAYS EXTERIOR LEAD, always the leader in the 
lead market — advertised to all architects and painters in 
Canada. Ordered by dealers because it's easy to sell, pays 
well and satisfies all — Special booklets to help. 



RAMSAYS VIENNA GREEN. A clean, pure, rich green in 
three shades, away ahead of imported greens and cheaper as 
well. The strongest and brightest of all the greens, to cover 
anything that should be green and kept green — booklets. 



RAMSAYS OUTSIDE PAINTS. This is the paint for the 
farmer's barn. It's what he wants for his outhouses, fences. 
etc. It does the work and isn't dear. It pays. 



RAMSAYS UNIVERSAL VARNISH. It is made for the 
boat, the canoe, the house, the church, doors, wainscots, 
anything that wants a varnish that is all varnish and nothing 
else. 



A. RAMSAY & SON, 
MONTREAL. 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 
ESTABLISHED 1842. 



Copper Co., Limited 



Booth 

Cuts 

Copper and Brass 



SHEETS-TUBES— RODS 



to any size. 



FULL STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND. 
PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 



The BOOTH COPPER CO., Limited 



110=123 Queen St. East, 

TORONTO 




There is always economy in buying the BEST. 
Time saved is money gained. 



We have no hesitation in making the statement that 



The Yale 
& Towne 



Pulley Blocks 



iMI 



:d 



1902 ar e the best made, longest wearing and quickest oper- 
ating blocks on the market. 

They are good sellers, and it will pay you to have them. 

We are carrying a large stock, and our prices and cata- 
logues will interest you. Send for them. 



THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY, 



SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS FOR 



One minute's work with The TRIPLEX 
BLOCK. 



The Yale & Towne IVIfg. Oo. 

Montreal and Vancouver 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FIRSTS AND SECONDS IN GRANITEWARE. 



VERY unsatisfactory for the retailer 
is the present condition of the 
graniteware business. The de- 
partmental stores " bargains "■ are kill - 
ing the trade. These bargain goods are 
often culls, which, owing to some defect 
in their manufacture have been rejected 
from the regular lines of goods. The 
dealers of Toronto, particularly, suffer 
from this practice and are becoming 
much dissatisfied with the manufacturers 
at their methods of doing business. This 
stale of the trade came up for discussion 
at a recent meeting of the hardware sec- 
tion of the Toronto blanch of the Retail 
Merchants' Association of Canada, and it 
was decided to discuss the matter at the 
coming convention of the Retail Mer- 
chants' Association of Canada, to be held 
in Toronto on September 9 and 10. 

To ascertain the views of the hardware 
merchants in Toronto on this matter, a 
representative of " Hardware and Metal" 
called on a number of dealers. 

H. C. Maas, hardware merchant, 360 
Queen street west, Toronto, said that 
there was now no profit for him in the 
graniteware business. For some years 
the manufacturers of that line of goods 
had been in the habit of disposing of 
their culls and surplus stock in quanti- 
ties at a time to the highest bidder, usu- 
ally one or other of the departmental 
stores. The smaller merchant, through 
insufficient- capital, was unable to buy 
these lots. Besides, his trade was not 
large enough to allow him to quickly 
dispose of large amounts of graniteware. 
So he had to let the departmental stores 
slaughter prices and demoralize the 
trade. He thought by the retail mer- 
chants meeting and taking- a firm stand 
in the matter the present state of affairs 
in the "graniteware market might be im- 
proved. 

The manner in which the graniteware 
business at the present time is conducted 
was not approved of by H. Tweedie, 371 
Yonge street. Some manufacturers sup- 
plied the departmental stores with granite- 
ware at about 35 per cent, less than 
was allowed the retailer. He also knew 
of a manufacturer of stoves who likewise 
did business with the departmental 
stores in the same way. For the last 
three years he had persistently refused 
to patronize these manufacturers on this 
account, ami he believed that if every 
other merchant did the same as he did. 
there would soon be an end put to this 
practice. 

.lohn Caslor, hardware merchant, 
Queen street west, declared that all re- 
tailers should not buy from manufactur- 
ers who discriminated against them in 
favor of the departmental stores. It 
would probably take a long campaign to 
thoroughly arouse the merchants to the 
necessity of their holding together and 
fighting the manufacturers who upheld 
the departmental stores. City merchants 
already were fully alive to the fact, and 
now their task was to educate the mer- 
chants outside the city as to the. neces 
sity of their binding themselves together 
and fighting for their rights. Granite- 
ware now had to lie sold by the smallei 
dealer almost without profit, owing to 

ill.- bargains of the depart menial store-;. 

Things were going from bad to worse and 

tie- onl\ way he could see to remedy this 
evil was for the merchants everywhere to 
organize. 



('. I'. (Jodden, hardware dealer. Kin- 
street east, had suffered from the depart- 
mental stores soiling their graniteware off 
by means of " bargains." The granite- 
ware business was now in a had condi- 
tion for the retailer, but he was unable 
to suggest a remedy. Anything he 
thought that would be attempted to lie- 
done to put a stop to this practice 
would but serve to advertise the depart- 
mental stores. 



G 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COM- 
PROMISES. 

FORCE ALLAIRE, sawmill owner, 
St. Francois Xavier de Bromp- 
ton, Que., has assigned. 
Jackson & Cheesman, contractors, etc., 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

R. A. Lawrence, general merchant, 
Wetaskiwin, N.W.T., has assigned. 

A. L. Kent is curator of A. H. Pare, 
general merchant, Pont de Maskinonge, 
Que. 

V. E. Paradis is curator of P. Gagnon. 
general merchant, St. Flavie Station, 
Que. 

Samuel Webster, general merchant, Cop- 
per Cliff, Ont., has assigned to David 
Jacobs, Sudbury. 

Gorman & McDonnell, general mer- 
chants, Douglas, Ont., are offering to 
compromise at 50c. on the dollar. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

P. A. Allen, blacksmith, Bridgen, Ont., 
has sold out. 

The assets of Riordan Bros., contract- 
ors, Montreal, are to be sold. 

II. A. Nash, blacksmith, Camilla, Ont., 
is advertising his business for sale. 

The assets of 0. Beaulieu, general mer- 
chant, New Carlisle, Que., are to be sold 
on August 5. 

Augustine & Son, planing- mill owners. 
Port Colborne, Ont., are advertising their 
business for sale. 

The stock of Simard & Trembly, general 
merchants, Copper Cliff, Ont., is adver- 
tised to be sold by tender. 

Henry Hunter, general and lumber mer- 
chant, Winchester Station, N.S., is ad- 
vertising his property for sale. 

The stock of Mason & Boright, general 
merchants, grist mill. etc.. Magog. Que., 
was advertised to be sold by auction. 

The stock of Joseph Ayotte, general 
merchant. Riviere a Pierre, Que., has been 
sold at 71c. on the dollar to Joseph 
Perron. 

The stock of the estate of Burton 
Sweet, general merchant, Goldenville. 
N.S., is advertised for sale by tender on 
August 15. 

John C. Ross, general merchant, Pleas 
ant Harbor, N.S.. will have his mining 
property, etc., sold by sheriff under exe 
eution of judgment, August 5. 

CHANCES. 

L. Taillon & Cie, St. Louis de Mile 

End, Que., has registered. 

Sarah Francis, harnessmaker, Douglas. 
Ont., is gi\ ing up business. 

Jackson <.V Co., contractors and build- 
ers, Montreal, have registered. 

\ Rochon & Cie, manufacturers of 
brooms, Quebec, have registered. 



The La Ferriere Lumber Co., Malbaie 
and Montreal, has registered. 

Mercier iV Mercier, lumber and grain 
merchants, St. Nicholas, Que., have re- 
gistered. 

C. S. Ryder, hardware merchant. Ex- 
tension, B.C., is opening a branch at 
Ladysmith. 

McBean iV Co., lumber merchants, To- 
ronto, have changed their style; to Mc- 
Hean & Verral. 

Hurlburt & Balfour. hardware mflu- 
chants, Wolseley, N.W.T., are succeeded 
by Hurlbert & Biden. 

Sara A. Hamilton (estate of), hard 
ware merchant. Emerson. Man., is suc- 
ceeded by Hamilton & Son. 

FIRES. 

Wm. Boivin, builder and contractor. 
Sorel, Que., was burned out; partially 
insured. 

John Hillock & Co.. planing mill 
owners, etc., Toronto, were partially 
burned out. 

DEATHS. 

James Shackleton, wagonmakcr, West 
Hill, Ont., is dead. 

P. A. Craig, blacksmith and carriage 
maker, Windsor, Ont., is dead. 

James McCalla, proprietor of W. J. & 
J. McCalla, grocers and hardware mer- 
chants, St. Catherines, Ont., is dead. 



ELECTRICAL NOTES 

ARRANGEMENTS are now b 
made for the transfer of the 
plant and all property of The 
People's Heat and Light Company to The 
Halifax Electric Tram Company ; the 
price to be paid by The Tram Company 
is $350,000. 

This week The Canadian Suspender 
Company of Toronto purchased a two 
horsepower motor from Jones & Moon 
22 Adelaide street west, Toronto. 

Jones 6c Moore, 22 Adelaide street west. 
Toronto, during the week have sold a 
complete electric lighting plant to The 
W. & A. G. Grav Co., of Saskatoon. 
N.W.T. 

The contract for the equipment of The 
Levis County Electric Railway Company, 
to be operated at Levis, opposite Que 
bee, connecting together Lexis. St. 
Joseph, Biennville and St. Romauld 
d'Etchemin, has been awarded to Ahern 
& Soper. Some 24 ears and snow 
sweepers will all lie made in Ottawa. The 
route of the railway along the river front 
commands a magnificent view of tin- Si 
Lawrence, Quebec city. Isle of Orleans 
and the Laurent ian Mountains, and the 
ears will serve a population of about 
25,000. 

Ahern & Soper have successfully com 
pleted the installation at Montreal and 
Chambly of 20 Westinghouse electric 
transformers, which are (he largest in 
size and greatest in capacity ever m 
factured in the world. Each transformer 

has a Capacity of 35,500 lights, making a 
total of almost three-quarters of a mil 
lion of lights. At Chambly the trans 
formers stop up the current to 25,000 
volts for transmission to Montreal, where 

it is transformed down afain to '2.11110 

volts for distribution on the circuits of 
The Montreal Light, Heal and Power 

Company. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



BURMAN & SONS' clippers 

3i t ablished ' 8 ^ BIRMINGHAM, ENG. l°n r d H B r ,r b r s n 



NO. 297. 




NO. 3 POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint." 

{The Czar of Russia. 
The King of Denmark. 
Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 



Having bought the good-will, 
machinery and stock of Wm. Bown, 
Limietd, we shall in future supply the 
Celebrated " Newmarket " Clipper, 
marked exactly as before, with the 
addition of " Made by Burman & Sons, 
Limited, Birmingham " on the handles. 
Largest makers of Horse Clippers in 
the world. 




THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

To be obtained from all the principal Jobbers throughout 
the Domic ion, 



Mar Safety 
Razor. 

The original and best Safety. 
A>^\. '-> Shaves Clean Saves Titie Never Pulls 

#w^taf 




4 Marvel of Simplicity and Durability 



Beware of Imitations. 

The Three Star- Safety is the only Safety 
Razor that can be adjusted to a hair's width 
by anybody to suit any face or beard by means 
of adjusting screws, fully protected from in- 
fringers by the U.S. Circuit Court. 




Establish- 
ed 1875. 



For sale by all leading dealers throughout Canada. 
Rock bottom prices upon application to 

KAMPFE BROS., 

1NVENTOFS AND MANUFACTURERS, 



8 Reade Street 



NEW YORK CITY 




Stoves 

and 

Ranges 



RIGHT PRICES 
QUICK SHIPMENTS 
QUALITY GUARANTEED 
FIRST-CLASS NICKLE PLATE 
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 



Made by- 



b. J. BARKER & CO. 

PICTON, OINT. 

—Toronto Agents— 
THE BATTV HARDWARE & STOVE CO. 




We import and 
manufacture 

every description 
of 

Window and 
Fancy Glass. 

Write for our 
new Catalogue. 



Hobbs Manufacturing Co. 



LONDON, CANADA. 



Limited 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 

THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 

Manufacturers of 
I, 2, 3 Bushel 




Grain 



AND 



Root 

B askFTs 

THE OAKVILLE 
BASKET CO. 



AVVVWVIVVVVVVVVVVWVWVWWWWVWVI 




A minute or two and your shave is through. The 
New Gem" fcafety Razor i° guaranteed to 
always shave any growth of l>t ard. Catalogues 
mailtd free fn m these Canadian agents : Mont- 
real - Caverhill, Lfarniont & Co.; Quebec 
Chinic Hardware Co.: Berlin— Jno. Fennell & 
Son ; Hamilton— Wood, Valiaoce & Co.; St. 
John, N.B.-Kerr & Robertson; Halifax. 
IM.S.-A M. Bell& Co.; Winnipeg, Man. 
—J. H. Ashdown Hardware Co.; Vancouver, 
B.C. -McLennan, McFeely & Co.; Victoria, 
B.C. — M. & H. A. Fov; or direct from maker*, 
The Cem Cutlery Co. -34 Reade St., 
N.Y.C. : 9 London Be, k.c, London ; 9 
Pickhuhen St., Hamburg, Germany. 



v^wwwvwvwwwwwwwwwwwvwi 



WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very j 
m liberal. A trial order solicited. Write for discounts. 



s. 



99 Niagara St., TORONTO FILE CO. 

CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS. 



s. 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FAIR 
WARNING. 

We desire to give the Hard- 
ware Trade timely notice and a 
fair warning, that they will consult 
their own interests by ordering 
promptly what they may require 
of "C" Brand Horse Nails. 

We have now arrived at the 
season of the year when every 
man and machine we have are 
fully engaged in the production 
of our usual average require- 
ments for the Fall trade. It is 
approaching the time when every 
hardware dealer sells more horse 
nails than at any other period of 
the year. Don't wait until your 
stock is sold out of certain sizes, 
and be subjected to the delay 
which is inevitable, when a large 
number of orders are poured in 
on us from one end of the coun- 
try to the other, and all wanted 
for " prompt shipment." 

Another thing : (between our- 
selves) anthracite coal of the high 
quality which we use for forging, 
is not to be had " for love or 
money." We have been waiting 
since May for a shipment. We 
have only enough for another 
month, and then it will depend 
upon the price of coal (if we can 
get any) and some other con- 
siderations, how much more we 
shall have to charge you for "Q" 
Brand Horse Nails. Youwontbuy 
them any lower this year than you 
can do to-day. We guarantee 
that. 

Moral :— Buy Q Brand 
Horse Nails to-day, and every 
day. 



Canada Horse Nail Company 

MONTREAL. 

August 2nd, 1902. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

METALLIC BLOTTERS. 

SOME people swear by blotters as good 
advertising mediums, and a glance 
at a set of six sent out by The 
Metallic Roofing Co., of Toronto, would 
convince even the most inveterate opponent 
of any kind of publicity that there was 
something pretty clever and insistent about 
the advertisements on these blotters. One- 
half the blotter is occupied by a cut done in 
glaring colors and the other half describes 
the picture in breezy fashion, always 
pointing to the moral that the goods of the 
roofing company are the best. 

SPORTING GOODS CATALOGUE. 

Catalogue No. 9, of the wholesale hard- 
ware firm of A.M. Bell & Co., Halifax, is 
dated July, 1902, and deals with the many 
ranges of shot guns, ammunition, etc., 
handled in their warehouse. Every article 
is illustrated and concisely described, with 
price affixed. Some space is also devoted 
to gun implements, sportsmen's sundries, 
skates, saws, halter chains and wringers, 
but the guns and rifles form the specialty. 

FINE PRECISION TOOLS. 

The Massachusetts Tool Co., of Green- 
field, Mass., who are represented in Canada 
by Decatur, Bull & Co., have issued a cata- 
logue of their fine precision tools, including 
steel rules, micrometers, calipers, etc., 
which the trade should apply for. It is 
illustrated with a number of exceptionally 
fine engravings of the vaiious tools, and 
full descriptive text will be found regarding 
each article. This catalogue will be sent to 
any of the readers of this paper applying to 
the above firm for it. 

CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO.'S CATALOGUE. 

Catalogue No 42, of Caverhill, Learmont 
& Co., Montreal, is a book of 80 pages 
illustrated with numerous cuts of the goods 
handled by this firm. They are dealers in 
guns, rifles, ammunition, sporting goods, 
skates, sleigh bells and sewing machines. 
Their guns and rifles are of the celebrated 
Marlin and Winchester makes, guaranteed 
to be of good materials and workmanship. 
Revolvers also can be obtained from this 
firm, who always carry a full range of 
patterns and makes varying in price 
according to their quality. For the benefit 
of their customers they always have on 
hand a full assortment of gun parts, load- 
ing implements, powder flisks, etc. Their 
steel traps, fishing tackle, compasses, hunt- 
ing knives are of good material and 
warranted to stand the test of use. Their 
steel skates are of durable pattern, and their 
sewing machines are tested before leaving 
the factory, and each bears the guarantee 
of the maker to stand the wear and tear 
of family use for five years. Further infor- 
mation may be obtained by addressing a 
card to the headquarters of this firm at 
Montreal. 




The popularity of green is strongly in 
evidence. Green is the color of the sesj 
son and may be seen everywhere. Green 
Shutters are still in vogue and the fa- 
vorite brands of the Canada Paint 
Company are preferred. 

The brands Dry, or ground in Oil are- 

"Evergreen." 

"Bottle Green." 

"Mistletoe Green." 

1 French Permanent Green." 

"Royal Permanent Green," 

and 

"Crown Imperial Green." 

Close buyers will bear in mind that we 
manufacture our own Green and Dry 
Colors from the essential chemicals. 

In Liquid Paints we make the following 
tints: 

"Apple Green." 

"Bottle Green." 

"Emerald Green." 

"Green Stone." 

"Olive." 

"Pea Green." 

"Parrot Green." 

"Window Blind Green," 

and 

"Mountain Green." 

In Carriage Colors ground in Japan 
we manufacture: 

"Coach Painters' Green." 
"Merrimac Green." 
"Parrot Green." 
"Quaker Green," 
"Very Deep Green." 
"Silician Olive," 

and 

"Bronze Green." 

OUR SUCCESS 

in Green is creating imitations. Avoid 
Sustitutes. 

THE 




Limi'ed. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



THAI OLDlflUSlED STOCK 

Why don't you get it together 
and have it made like new ? 

WE REPLATE, REPOLISH 

all kinds of Metal Goods in 
Gold, Silver, Copper, Brass 
and Nickel. 

Don't put it off any longer. Get 

the old stock fixed up for your trade. 

WRITE US FOR PRICES. 

MOORE & ORR, E ^ C at r e°rs 
81 Adelaide St. W., - - TORONTO. 

Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 

AND 

. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 




HARNESS PREPARATIONS. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 

HARNESS DRESSING 

Recognized as 
"THE STANDARD." 

Produces a brilliant jet- 
black gloss which will not 
peel or smut and to which 
dirt will not stick. 





Frank Miller's 

Harness Soap 

Unrivaled for 
cleaning and soft- 
ening Harness. 

Put up in cakes, 
pans, boxes and 
tubs. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil. 



Preserves and softens the leather 
thus adding life. 

° ' Manufactured B n - 

The highest quality of oil on the r5SNrS« 



market. 



* TO1MRU v 

EIARN 
OIL 



WraJ>|)in<j 
Papers 
That 
Please. 



Our kind — for 
we have in stock 
only the good 
kind — the kind 
that will give satis- 
faction always to 
both yourself and 
your customers. 



CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



The Oshawa Wire Fence Co. 

OSHAWA, ONT. Limited 

Manufacturers of . . . 

Woven Wire Fencing, Gates, Etc. 

Also Dealers in Galvanized Fence Wire 




Agents wanted SeDd for catalogue and prices. 



> 



PnTENTERPRISE^nnI on an article is a 
Gtiddraoitee of QUALITY 



Bone, Shell & 
Corn Mill 



No. 21, $2.50 



INT* ENTERPRISE *Bl 

etti&tfte FOOD 

CHOPPERS 

Four Knive.r 

with e&.ch Mixchine 




No. 100, chops 2 lbs. per minute, Si. 50 
No. 300, chops j lbs. per minute, #2.25 



Sell every D&.y in Ye&.r 
GUARANTEED TO CHOP RAW MEAT 



Illustrated Catalogue FREE 



Ordei through your Jobber 



Cherry Stoners 

5 Sues & Styles 




n 

No. I, $7.50 doz. 



Rapid Grinding & 
Pulverizing Mills 

1,5 Sizes & Styles for HaadH 
& Power, $1 S5 to 300.00 (j 




No. 2*s, $4-. 75 



*io w.?r r e k n B s"e« TEe Enterprise Mfg. (q. of Pa., Philadelphia, Pa. 



San Francisco Branch, 
105 Front Street 



15 



iO 
20 
16 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 28, 1902. 

IN company with other jobbers, hardware- 
men have been busy all week looking 
after visitors and customers. There is 
great activity in hardware at present, and 
some houses are finding it hard to keep 
abreast of orders. Considerable selling 
was done during the week. All lines of 
building hardware are in specially good 
demand, as the amount of building 
throughout the country is astonishing. 

There is a good deal of interest being 
taken in binder twine in this market at 
present owing to the splendid outlook for 
crops and the fact that there will be little or 
no surplus twine in the United States to help 
out this market. Prices have not changed 
since last week, but there is a decidedly 
firmer tone to the market. Implement men 
are busy, as the shipment of mowers and 
binders is in full blast, and there is also a 
good demand for ploughs. The business 
done by implement men through Fair week 
was heavy. Quotations are as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb S3 3° 

Plain twist 3 40 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 85 

n 3 90 

12 3 95 

13 4 10 

14 4 25 

^ , ■ , 15 4 35 

Galvanized wire, 6 to 8 gauge 4 00 

9 3 5° 

10 " 4 05 

" 11 4 20 

12 " 3 65 

13 3 75 

14 4 45 

15 " 4 6° 

16 4 75 

Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy ,keg 3 25 

16 and 20 3 35 

10 3 35 

8 345 

o 3 5° 

4 365 

3 3 9° 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch ioJ4 

H inch 8^ 

5-16 inch 554 

% inch s% 

7-16 inch 5 

%\.o% inch 4 Ji 

Cutnails, 30to6ody 310 

201040 3 15 

" 10 to 16 3 20 

;; s 325 

6 3 3° 

4 3 6° 

3 3 75 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 30 

No. 2 and larger 4 05 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 55 

No. 2 and larger 4 03 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 440 

No. 2 and larger 4 35 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. .. 2 79 

18 to 22 gauge 4 75 

24 gauge 5 00 

26gauge 5 25 

28gauge S 50 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28gauge 8 50 

CttV'^te, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 11 00 

VX 13 00 

l»V " 15 00 

August 2nd, K 



Ingot tin 33 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 00 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch.... 50 an 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-i6andlarger $13 50 

H 14 co 

" }i and 5-16 1420 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 17 00 

H 17 55 

" M and 5-16 1800 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping J 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Poultry netting, 24 in 1 35 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 M 

Round" " 82J* 

Flat ' ' brass 80 

Round" " 75 

Coach 57 % p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copp